MCN Curated Headlines Archive for March, 2013

“As in Korine’s other works, the evident lack of anything one might call “style” becomes its style, duly celebrated by our writers who seem to have lost their minds to Harmony’s [come]-on.”
Jon Jost On Getting A Refund For Spring Breakers

NY Times

“That would be an odd event if it happened.”
On Possible Changes During The Suddenly-Announced Oscar Enclave 

guardian

I don’t have to work now, but I have to work because it’s not about money, it’s about passion. It is part of my personal evolution.”
Salma Hayek’s Family Values

“Last week a friend saw a screening of Spring Breakers. Afterwards she tweeted that a fight almost broke out during the screening when a man shushed some girls, who then called him a —-. Afterwards, those girls chugged a two-litre bottle of cream soda and a 40 of vodka in the washroom.”
Canadian Journalism Unsubstantiated

NY Times

“This is Dawn taking the lead.”
Academy Rounds Up Members For Oscar Advice

hollywoodreporter.com

“A last resort for kinda-sorta-almost-journalists whose options have been severely limited by their extreme and intolerant views; a media colostomy bag.”
Jim Carrey Has Words For Fox News, Which Does Not Care For Him, Either

Spring Breakers is a crowd-pleaser, although given its confounding creepiness, the crowd it pleases most is surely the 40-year-old filmmaker’s intellectual fan base… Dunham has tapped into a vein of tragicomic sexual naturalism in which, as in the novels of Czech writers Milan Kundera and Ivan Klima, social constraint (here economic) makes sex, however messy, the lone arena of freedom.”
Hoberman On Spring Breakers And, Well, “Girls”

MCN Curated Headlines

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What are we doing wrong?
“Well, first of all, by “we” I assume you mean the public, the public approach or the public discourse, which means the discourse that takes place in the media. And for the purposes of this discussion, let us imagine that the media is white and thus approaches the topic of race as if they (the white people) were the answer and them (the black people) were the question. And so, in the interest of fairness, they take their turn (having first, of course, given it to themselves) and then invite comment by some different white people and some similar black people. They give what purports to be simply their point of view and then everyone else gives their beside-the-point of view.

“The customary way for white people to think about the topic of race—and it is only a topic to white people—is to ask, How would it be if I were black? But you can’t separate the “I” from being white. The “I” is so informed by the experience of being white that it is its very creation—it is this “I” in this context that is, in fact, the white man’s burden. People who think of themselves as well intentioned—which is, let’s face it, how people think of themselves—believe that the best, most compassionate, most American way to understand another person is to walk a mile in their shoes. And I think that’s conventionally the way this thing is approached. And that’s why the conversation never gets anywhere and that’s why the answers always come back wrong and the situation stays static—and worse than static.”
~ Fran Lebowitz, 1997

“If one could examine his DNA, it would read ACTOR. He embraced every role with fire and fierce dedication. Playing Bela Lugosi in Tim Burton’s Ed Wood was his loving tribute to all actors and garnered him a well-deserved Academy Award. His work was his joy and his legacy.”
~ Barbara Bain On Martin Landau