MCN Curated Headlines Archive for March, 2013

“As in Korine’s other works, the evident lack of anything one might call “style” becomes its style, duly celebrated by our writers who seem to have lost their minds to Harmony’s [come]-on.”
Jon Jost On Getting A Refund For Spring Breakers

NY Times

“That would be an odd event if it happened.”
On Possible Changes During The Suddenly-Announced Oscar Enclave 

guardian

I don’t have to work now, but I have to work because it’s not about money, it’s about passion. It is part of my personal evolution.”
Salma Hayek’s Family Values

“Last week a friend saw a screening of Spring Breakers. Afterwards she tweeted that a fight almost broke out during the screening when a man shushed some girls, who then called him a —-. Afterwards, those girls chugged a two-litre bottle of cream soda and a 40 of vodka in the washroom.”
Canadian Journalism Unsubstantiated

NY Times

“This is Dawn taking the lead.”
Academy Rounds Up Members For Oscar Advice

hollywoodreporter.com

“A last resort for kinda-sorta-almost-journalists whose options have been severely limited by their extreme and intolerant views; a media colostomy bag.”
Jim Carrey Has Words For Fox News, Which Does Not Care For Him, Either

Spring Breakers is a crowd-pleaser, although given its confounding creepiness, the crowd it pleases most is surely the 40-year-old filmmaker’s intellectual fan base… Dunham has tapped into a vein of tragicomic sexual naturalism in which, as in the novels of Czech writers Milan Kundera and Ivan Klima, social constraint (here economic) makes sex, however messy, the lone arena of freedom.”
Hoberman On Spring Breakers And, Well, “Girls”

MCN Curated Headlines

Amazing GBG on: "Whatever it is that people are reacting to in these superhero films, it’s not what they say they’re reacting to. They clearly don’t care about consistent characterization, original storytelling, or anything else they say they do, because if they did they’d be a lot more picky. What they really like is what we all like: confidence. Movies boil down to someone – or a group of someones – telling us a story. And telling a story well takes confidence. If a storyteller has a great story packed with interesting characters and exciting developments but they stumble over the order of things and mumble during the important bits, the experience is going to suck. Likewise, if the story is poor but they tell it well it’ll be a good time even if afterwards we realize it didn’t make any sense."

Ray Pride on: "Whatever it is that people are reacting to in these superhero films, it’s not what they say they’re reacting to. They clearly don’t care about consistent characterization, original storytelling, or anything else they say they do, because if they did they’d be a lot more picky. What they really like is what we all like: confidence. Movies boil down to someone – or a group of someones – telling us a story. And telling a story well takes confidence. If a storyteller has a great story packed with interesting characters and exciting developments but they stumble over the order of things and mumble during the important bits, the experience is going to suck. Likewise, if the story is poor but they tell it well it’ll be a good time even if afterwards we realize it didn’t make any sense."

Roy Batty on: "Whatever it is that people are reacting to in these superhero films, it’s not what they say they’re reacting to. They clearly don’t care about consistent characterization, original storytelling, or anything else they say they do, because if they did they’d be a lot more picky. What they really like is what we all like: confidence. Movies boil down to someone – or a group of someones – telling us a story. And telling a story well takes confidence. If a storyteller has a great story packed with interesting characters and exciting developments but they stumble over the order of things and mumble during the important bits, the experience is going to suck. Likewise, if the story is poor but they tell it well it’ll be a good time even if afterwards we realize it didn’t make any sense."

Ray Pride on: 15 For Your Consideration Screenplays Await

Tom Spath on: 15 For Your Consideration Screenplays Await

James Brigham (Bigg) Bunyon on: "The Not-So-Glossy Future of Magazines"

Ray Pride on: Telluride Fest Looks Back At 44

Jose Angel Cruz on: Telluride Fest Looks Back At 44

I am Groot on: Enjoy Your Groot Soundboard

Ron on: Josh Marshall Muses On Leslie Nielsen And The Meaning Of Life

Quote Unquotesee all »

What’s up with your people mover shot, where it seems like people are kind of floating along?
Oh, my signature shot? That’s just a new way for people to move! It’s really become my Alfred Hitchcock cameo. I did not invent that shot, but Ernest and I did it on the set of Mo Better Blues, when Shorty had to walk [through the park], and I thought, “Let’s try it.” But after that, we tried to have a reason for it. For example, that wonderful sequence in Malcolm X where you hear the great song, “A Change Is Gonna Come.” The final scene is like that, Malcolm floating along to his destiny. In 25th Hour, after Philip Seymour Hoffman has kissed Anna Paquin, we did a shot like that, and it shows his state of mind. In Inside Man, after Denzel thinks he’s witnessed the murder of a hostage, we did the floating shot there.

So you just like the way it looks?
Yeah!
~ Spike Lee To Matt Zoller Seitz

“I never accepted the term contrarian. I think that’s offensive, frankly. And my response to that is: if I’m a contrarian, what are other reviewers? What I strive to do is be a good critic, not somebody who simply accepts the product put in front of me. I guess it scares people to think that they don’t have any originality; that they don’t have the capacity to think for themselves.

“There’s a line a lot of reviewers use that I don’t like at all. They say ‘accept the film on its own terms.’ What that really means is, ‘accept the film as it is advertised.’ That’s got nothing to do with criticism. Nothing to do with having a response as a film watcher. A thinking person has to analyze what’s on screen, not simply rubber-stamp it or kowtow to marketing.”m

“To me, everything does have a political component and I think it’s an interesting way to look at art. It’s one way that makes film reviewing, I think, a politically relevant form of journalism. We do live in a political world, and we bring our political sense to the movies with us – unless you’re the kind of person who goes to the movies and shuts off the outside world. I’m not that kind of person.”
~ Armond White to Luke Buckmaster