MCN Curated Headlines Archive for February, 2013

“If you’re going to follow around somebody to murder, I’d much rather be photographing a woman than a man.”
Talking Blood With Brian DePalma

LA Times

“The Oscar in general is a blood sport,” Zadan said. “A lot of the TV press goes back year after year and complains about a traditional host, but if you have someone groundbreaking they complain about that.”
The Self-Canonizing And Further Self-Anointing Of Oscar Producers Aided By LAT

“And then Paul Schrader let me see The Canyons. “
DiGiacomo (AKA Who’s Left At Movieline) Has A Personal Santa Ana

“I don’t understand why I’m being asked whether it was 23 minutes (it definitely was not) or more [at LAX]. That is the wrong question. And I think Americans should be proud that there are people like Michael Moore and so many others I met in LA who are willing to ask the right question: why was I held in the first place?”
Oscar-Nominated Documentarian Emad Burnat Questions Buzzfeed’s Priorities 

“My conviction is that the main missing element in most depictions of jazz on film is musicians listening to one another.”
Jonathan Rosenbaum On Jazz And Film Criticism

“Hollywood’s not necessarily the most supportive community. There is a lot of schadenfreude and a lot of snark.”
VICE Ventilates The Canyons

wsj

“It was made without any Canadian consultation. And we can live with that. But at the same time the ‘Canadian community,’ felt we played a larger and more active role than that which was portrayed in the movie.”
Former Canadian Ambassador Says “Canadian Caper” Should Have Been More About Canada And Less About Argo

“The next morning, right before she got in her car to head off to work, my wife turned back and—standing there on our front steps—and said, ‘Ang, don’t forget your dream.’”
Ang Lee On How He Stayed On His Path

MCN Curated Headlines

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“Last night’s Oscar bizarreness was not just bizarre but bizarre in a way that is typical of this entirely bizarre time. The rhythm of the yes-they-won-oh-my-God-no-they-didn’t event, with La La Land replaced by Moonlight as Best Picture, was weirdly like that of… Election Night. First, a more or less expected, if “safe,” result was on its way—though Hillary Clinton never got all the way to the stage, so to speak, the result did seem safely in hand at 7pm., according to the polling—and the expected and safe people were ready to deliver their touching but obviously polished pieces. Then the sudden confusion and visible near-panic of people running around in the backgroun, with the same slightly horrified spirit that one felt on Election Night as shocking results began emerging from exurban counties in Florida. Then, yes—can this be happening?—the revised and unexpected result.

“In this case, obviously, the result was positive to all but the poor La La Land producers, with their earnest and spouse-approved speeches already delivered. Moonlight was no Donald Trump of cinema, and obviously a popular favorite. But the rhythm of the night was disconcertingly the same, and the sheer improbability of the happenstance scarily alike. Nothing like this has remotely happened before. This wasn’t just a minor kerfuffle. This was a major malfunction. Trump cannot be President. People don’t say “Grab ’em by the pussy” and get elected President. Can’t happen. In the same way, while there have been Oscar controversies before—tie votes and rejected trophies—never before has there been an occasion when the entirely wrong movie was given the award, the speeches delivered, and then another movie put in its place. That doesn’t happen. Ever.

“And so both of these bizarre events put one in mind of a simple but arresting thesis: that we are living in the Matrix, and something has gone wrong with the controllers. This idea was, I’m told, put forward first and most forcibly by the NYU philosopher David Chalmers: what is happening lately, he says, is proof that we are living in a computer simulation and that something has recently gone haywire within it. The people or machines or aliens who are supposed to be running our lives are having some kind of breakdown. There’s a glitch, and we are in it. There may be not merely a glitch in the Matrix. There may be a Loki, a prankster, suddenly running it.”
~ Adam Gopnik

“I think they were focused so hard on politics that they didn’t get the act together at the end,” President Trump said. “It was a little sad. It took away from the glamour of the Oscars. It didn’t feel like a very glamorous evening. I’ve been to the Oscars. There was something very special missing, and then to end that way was sad.”
~ Trump Offers Breitbart Exclusive On His Thinking About Oscar