MCN Curated Headlines Archive for November, 2012

NY Times

“As most professionals point out, virtually no producer will charge to read material. To do so, they say, is a predatory practice that exploits writers.”
Times Again Glories In Its “Edginess” By Esteeming “Scriptshadow” Script Spoiler “Carson Reeves”; Credits Him With The Greenlight Of Social Network

NY Times

“Everyone will say this about beauty: you don’t really know anything else. If you’re ugly, you’re ugly; if you’re beautiful, you’re beautiful. You don’t have a comparison.”
Charlotte Rampling Has “Rules Of Engagement”

Imagine if Oscar voters were able to parse the jewels from the schlock.”
A Cry Rises Up To Recognize Nicole Kidman In The Paperboy

“There were two things he never told about Ken Regan. That’s his age and his cell phone number. Being true to his wishes, I can’t tell.”
A Fine Photographer Passes Agelessly
With – His Portfolio Of Film, Sports And Music Shots

“I’ve had people assume I dislike Chris Brown because I’m taking up for Rihanna, I’m not.”
Jenny Johnson On Shooing An Abusive Chris Brown From Twitter

guardian

“More journalists have died in the line of duty this year than at any other point since records began. For those choosing this dangerous profession, Syria is the killing field: more have died on assignment there than in any other country.”
Information Revolutions

LA Times

Don Rhymer, 51, Wrote Big Momma’s House, The Santa Clause 2, Agent Cody Banks 2: Destination London, Surf’s Up
“We had been married 29 years, 6 months, and 7 days, and I’m left with a gaping hole in my heart. He was the strongest, most generous and most honest person I’ve ever known. Oh yeah, and he was funny too.”
His Wife Remembers Him On His Cancer Blog

hollywoodreporter.com

“It’s unfortunate that he has nothing better to do with his time than churn out graphic and homophobic dribble about imaginary superheroes.”
Concern Group Fields “Guardians Of The Galaxy” Project Director James Gunn’s Blog For 2011 Offense
And – A Comics Person’s Reflection On The Mess
Now – “People who are familiar with me know that I’m an outspoken proponent for the rights of the gay and lesbian community, women and anyone who feels disenfranchised, and it kills me that some other outsider like myself, despite his or her gender or sexuality, might feel hurt or attacked by something I said.”
Gunn Fires Back

NY Times

“Sundance, known for championing dark and inscrutable films, has unveiled an unusually accessible—and sellable—competition lineup.”
Barnes Deciphers Sundance13 For Himself

MCN Curated Headlines

Quote Unquotesee all »

“The sad and painful truth is that pretty much everyone in this town knew who Harvey was. I have had long talks with my most liberal friends. Did we know he was a rapist? We didn’t. But did we know that for decades he has been offering actresses big careers in exchange for sexual favors? Yes, we did — and make no mistake, that is its own kind of rape. And did we all — or did any of us — refuse to do business with him on moral grounds? No. We ALL STAYED IN BUSINESS WITH HIM. I have never done business with Harvey but I can tell you with certainty that I would have — because I was recently approached by a film festival he sponsors. They asked me to submit my short film for their consideration and I did it without thinking twice. I am a dyed-in-the-wool feminist and a vocal one at that. So why didn’t I think twice? Because this entire town is built on the ugly principals that Harvey takes to an horrific extreme. If I didn’t work with people whose behavior I find reprehensible, I wouldn’t have a career.”
~ Showrunner Krista Vernoff

From AMPAS president John Bailey:

Dear Fellow Academy Members,

Danish director Carl Dreyer’s 1928 film “The Passion of Joan of Arc” is not only one of the visual landmarks of the silent era, but is a deeply disturbing portrait of a young woman’s persecution in the face of the male judges and priests of the ruling order. The actress Maria Falconetti gave one of the most profoundly affecting performances in the history of cinema as the Maid of Orleans.

Since the decision of the Academy’s Board of Governors on Saturday October 14 to expel producer Harvey Weinstein from its membership, I have been haunted not only by the recurring image of Falconetti and the sad arc of her career (dying in Argentina in 1946, reputedly from a crash diet) but of Joan’s refusal to submit to an auto de fe recantation of her beliefs.

Recent public testimonies by some of filmdom’s most recognized women regarding sexual intimidation, predation, and physical force is, clearly, a turning point in the film industry—and hopefully in our country, where what happens in the world of movies becomes a marker of societal Zeitgeist. Their decision to stand up against a powerful, abusive male not only parallels the cinema courage of Falconetti’s Joan but gives all women courage to speak up.

After Saturday’s Board of Governors meeting, the Academy issued a passionately worded statement, expressing not only our concern about harassment in the film industry, but our intention to be a strong voice in changing the culture of sexual exploitation in the movie business, already common well before the founding of the Academy 90 years ago. It is up to all of us Academy members to more clearly define for ourselves the parameters of proper conduct, of sexual equality, and respect for our fellow artists throughout our industry. The Academy cannot, and will not, be an inquisitorial court, but we can be part of a larger initiative to define standards of behavior, and to support the vulnerable women and men who may be at personal and career risk because of violations of ethical standards by their peers.

Yours,
John