MCN Curated Headlines Archive for June, 2012

guardian

“We are satisfied that the animals won’t now end up in an abattoir and that much more attention is now being paid to their welfare.”
Danny Boyle Assures PETA The Olympics Opener Will Be Kind To The Animals

NY Times

“Mr. Baldwin possesses what you might call the salutary egotism of avid living, as opposed to the rotten narcissism of amoral grasping and mistreatment of other people.”
Lee Siegel Elucidates His Alec Baldwin Issues For The Fashion Section

“Back to business as usual, which means being crabby about Cannes and printing long articles about filmmakers nobody has heard of.”
A Genial Editor’s Letter From Cinema Scope’s Mark Peranson 

“I loved whoever was making these actresses comfortable enough to express the minutiae of being a human woman onscreen.”
Lena Dunham Remembers Nora Ephron

“It’s all about the truth. It’s really about how important searching for the truth is, and how digging for the truth then is different than it is today.”
Redford Talks Watergate To Sean Means

NY Times

“She could get a little wry about the more self-obsessed aspects of the movement at its height, like the meetings where everyone was required to bring mirrors and examine their private parts.”
Times Adds Gail Collins To Its Many Cooks In Nora Ephron’s Kitchen

MCN Curated Headlines

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“One of my favorite things in watching any performance on film is when there isn’t a lot of cutting going on and when you get a chance to become really absorbed in the artist in hand. The same way we do, hopefully, at a concert, when we get a chance to really trip in to something that’s happening on stage. Whether the singer’s singing, or one of the other musicians is playing, we sort of stay there instead of cutting round with our eyes a lot.”
~ Jonathan Demme

“We’ve talked about this before in the past, my obsession with the Shakespearean histories having the ideal combination of the sweet and the sour. In ‘Henry IV, Part II’ which we’ve discussed before, in the end of that story it’s very complex and haunting because Prince Hal becomes Henry the King, and he has transcended his hoodlum days and at the ceremony is Falstaff, his good friend with whom he has really fucked around and been a loser with, and Falstaff comes up to him and says, ‘Now that you’re king we can really party,’ and the king famously says, ‘I know thee not, old man.’ It becomes Henry IV’s anointment and Falstaff’s catastrophe. That’s life. I have experienced very little unfettered triumph. There are moments, such as when my children are born, but even that comes with new fears and anxieties. In a sense the better you can communicate that life is both at once, the more powerful over time something becomes. One strives for something where the threads are there because it lasts in way that is very palpable. The idea of a tragedy is powerful in literature and theater, but in cinema it doesn’t work, certainly not commercially, and less so critically. Why is that? I think it has to do with how movies are so close to us.”
~ James Gray