MCN Curated Headlines Archive for April, 2012

“I knew it would be on the front page of the New York Times—that is, if he was willing to go public. I think people in this business know, it’s like pornography: you can’t define [a front page story], but you know it when you hear it. I would have some fun with it because it’s a fun story.”
How The NYT Came Upon Its 92-Year-Old Movie-Pirate-To-The-Troops And How The Writer Congratulates Himself

NY Times

“Hell, I need the money. Authors need everyone—Amazon, Apple, Barnes & Noble, Byliner—to make a go of it and to continue to do what we do.”
Carr On Amazon’s Peremptory Cutting Price Of Buzz Bissinger’s New E-Book To Zero

NY Times

“I got killed on the last one, but it made $146 million worldwide.”
Garry Marshall Regrets Nothing At 77, Not Even Fonzie Jumping That Shark

“Google Fiber will definitely be a disruptive force. The studios know that if we stick our heads in the sand, we will fail, pure and simple.”
Google Fiber’s High Speeds, Akin To Those In South Korea, Prompt Fears

“How much input does Sweetie have? Does she give you notes?”
The Power Behind Barry Sonnenfeld’s Throne

NY Times

“They have to enjoy the experience of being part of the business, of going to the festivals and being part of a very fun industry.”
Times Columnizes Strategies For Indie Film Investment

MCN Curated Headlines

tidalmediainc on: Black Panther: $387 Million Worldwide

Frances Aubrey on: David Klion On “Unlearning Woody Allen”

Ray Pride on: 2017 FYC (For Your Consideration) Screenplays Now Up To 36 Titles

YancySkancy on: 2017 FYC (For Your Consideration) Screenplays Now Up To 36 Titles

Debbie on: 2017 FYC (For Your Consideration) Screenplays Now Up To 36 Titles

Warren on: "Whatever it is that people are reacting to in these superhero films, it’s not what they say they’re reacting to. They clearly don’t care about consistent characterization, original storytelling, or anything else they say they do, because if they did they’d be a lot more picky. What they really like is what we all like: confidence. Movies boil down to someone – or a group of someones – telling us a story. And telling a story well takes confidence. If a storyteller has a great story packed with interesting characters and exciting developments but they stumble over the order of things and mumble during the important bits, the experience is going to suck. Likewise, if the story is poor but they tell it well it’ll be a good time even if afterwards we realize it didn’t make any sense."

Amazing GBG on: "Whatever it is that people are reacting to in these superhero films, it’s not what they say they’re reacting to. They clearly don’t care about consistent characterization, original storytelling, or anything else they say they do, because if they did they’d be a lot more picky. What they really like is what we all like: confidence. Movies boil down to someone – or a group of someones – telling us a story. And telling a story well takes confidence. If a storyteller has a great story packed with interesting characters and exciting developments but they stumble over the order of things and mumble during the important bits, the experience is going to suck. Likewise, if the story is poor but they tell it well it’ll be a good time even if afterwards we realize it didn’t make any sense."

Ray Pride on: "Whatever it is that people are reacting to in these superhero films, it’s not what they say they’re reacting to. They clearly don’t care about consistent characterization, original storytelling, or anything else they say they do, because if they did they’d be a lot more picky. What they really like is what we all like: confidence. Movies boil down to someone – or a group of someones – telling us a story. And telling a story well takes confidence. If a storyteller has a great story packed with interesting characters and exciting developments but they stumble over the order of things and mumble during the important bits, the experience is going to suck. Likewise, if the story is poor but they tell it well it’ll be a good time even if afterwards we realize it didn’t make any sense."

Roy Batty on: "Whatever it is that people are reacting to in these superhero films, it’s not what they say they’re reacting to. They clearly don’t care about consistent characterization, original storytelling, or anything else they say they do, because if they did they’d be a lot more picky. What they really like is what we all like: confidence. Movies boil down to someone – or a group of someones – telling us a story. And telling a story well takes confidence. If a storyteller has a great story packed with interesting characters and exciting developments but they stumble over the order of things and mumble during the important bits, the experience is going to suck. Likewise, if the story is poor but they tell it well it’ll be a good time even if afterwards we realize it didn’t make any sense."

Ray Pride on: 19 For Your Consideration Screenplays Await

Nate Jones Prepares And Consumes The “Hungry Boy” Breakfast From Phantom Thread

How The End Credits of Black Panther Were Made

Richard Brody Hasn’t Reviewed “Mute” Yet, But Boy, Boy, He Didn’t Like Annihilation

A Conversation Among Oscar’s Only Four African-American Directing Nominees in 90 Years

Performers for 90th Oscars Announced

“Portland’s Living Room Theaters sues movie giant Regal when film goes dark”

“John Mahoney: Stage Creature And Child of God”

“Peter Thiel’s campaign to ruin Gawker Media was conceived and orchestrated by a previously unknown associate who served as a middleman, allowing the billionaire to conceal his involvement with the bankrolling of lawsuits that eventually drove the New York media outlet into bankruptcy. That man, an Oxford-educated Australian citizen, has few known connections to Thiel, but approached him in 2011 with an elaborate proposal to use a legal strategy to wipe out the media organization. That plot ultimately succeeded.”

“The document is just nine pages, but it serves as a subtle yet unmistakable indictment of NPR management, as much for what it doesn’t say as for what it does. With depressing regularity, managers were told of [top editor Michael] Oreskes’ advances, or given evidence of inappropriate behavior. At almost every step, their pursuit was slowed by bureaucratic snafus, or a remarkable lack of curiosity, given how much power Oreskes wielded in his newsroom. Even in Oreskes’ final 24 hours, the board met to discuss the allegations but held off taking take action—until the Post story ran. Then, Oreskes couldn’t be out the door soon enough.”

True/False Film Fest Extends Sustainability Program

Quote Unquotesee all »

“The Motion Picture Academy, at considerable expense and with great efficiency, runs all the nominated pictures at its own theater, showing each picture twice, once in the afternoon, once in the evening. A nominated picture is one in connection with which any kind of work is nominated for an award, not necessarily acting, directing, or writing; it may be a purely technical matter such as set-dressing or sound work. This running of pictures has the object of permitting the voters to look at films which they may happen to have missed or to have partly forgotten. It is an attempt to make them realize that pictures released early in the year, and since overlaid with several thicknesses of battered celluloid, are still in the running and that consideration of only those released a short time before the end of the year is not quite just.

“The effort is largely a waste. The people with votes don’t go to these showings. They send their relatives, friends, or servants. They have had enough of looking at pictures, and the voices of destiny are by no means inaudible in the Hollywood air. They have a brassy tone, but they are more than distinct.”All this is good democracy of a sort. We elect Congressmen and Presidents in much the same way, so why not actors, cameramen, writers, and all rest of the people who have to do with the making of pictures? If we permit noise, ballyhoo, and theater to influence us in the selection of the people who are to run the country, why should we object to the same methods in the selection of meritorious achievements in the film business? If we can huckster a President into the White House, why cannot we huckster the agonized Miss Joan Crawford or the hard and beautiful Miss Olivia de Havilland into possession of one of those golden statuettes which express the motion picture industry’s frantic desire to kiss itself on the back of its neck? The only answer I can think of is that the motion picture is an art. I say this with a very small voice. It is an inconsiderable statement and has a hard time not sounding a little ludicrous. Nevertheless it is a fact, not in the least diminished by the further facts that its ethos is so far pretty low and that its techniques are dominated by some pretty awful people.

“If you think most motion pictures are bad, which they are (including the foreign), find out from some initiate how they are made, and you will be astonished that any of them could be good. Making a fine motion picture is like painting “The Laughing Cavalier” in Macy’s basement, with a floorwalker to mix your colors for you. Of course most motion pictures are bad. Why wouldn’t they be?”
~ Raymond Chandler, “Oscar Night In Hollywood,” 1948

“Film festivals, for those who don’t know, are not exactly the glitzy red carpet affairs you see on TV. Those do happen, but they’re a tiny part of the festival. The main part of any film festival are the thousands of people with festival passes hanging on lanyards beneath their anoraks, carrying brochures for movies you have never and will never hear of, desperately scrabbling to sell whatever movie it is to buyers from all over the world. Every hotel bar, every cafe, every restaurant is filled to the brim with these people, talking loudly about non-existent deals. The Brits are the worst because most of the British film industry, with a few honourable exceptions, are scam artists and chancers who move around from company to company failing to get anything good made and trying to cast Danny Dyer in anything that moves. I’m seeing guys here who I first met twenty years ago and who are still wearing the same clothes, doing the same job (albeit for a different company) and spinning the same line of bullshit about how THIS movie has Al Pacino or Meryl Streep or George Clooney attached and, whilst that last one didn’t work out, THIS ONE is going to be HUGE. As the day goes on, they start drinking and it all gets ugly and, well, that’s why I’m the guy walking through the Tiergarten with a camera taking pictures of frozen lakes and pretending this isn’t happening.

“Berlin is cool, though and I’ve been lucky to be doing meetings with some people who want to actually get things done. We’ll see what comes of it.”
~ Julian Simpson