MCN Curated Headlines Archive for March, 2012

NY Times

“You can say no. You can not be the object of ridicule.”
Peter Dinklage On Making The Right Choices

indie wire

“If we can’t agree that folks who quietly flouted Prohibition in private (or who smoke weed at home today, for that matter) weren’t (aren’t) evil-enabling scumbags, then there’s just no common ground here.”
D’Angelo Doubles Down Against Those Who Say He Shouldn’t Download Movies Illegally

NY Times

“This Disney Theatrical Productions adaptation of the 1992 Disney movie musical is made up largely of numbers that feel like blazing banner headlines. And if none of them quite match the immortal panache of the New York Post classic ‘Headless Body in Topless Bar,’ you have to give their creators points for consistency.”
“Newsies”: The Pan

wsj

“If your kid comes out of the bedroom and says he just shut down the government, he should have an outfit for that.”
Some Quality Time With John Waters

nymag

“Seems every competitor and enemy piling on with lies and libels. So bad, easy to hit back hard, which preparing.”
Rupert Murdoch Takes Case To Twitter

MCN Curated Headlines

Quote Unquotesee all »

Who are the critics speaking to?
Nobody seems able to answer the question of how you can make theatre criticism more appealing, more clickworthy. One answer is to be a goddamn flamethrower every week, be a bombthrower, to write scorched-earth reviews. Just be completely hedonistic and ego-driven in your criticism, become a master stylist, and treat everything in front of you onstage as fodder for your most delicious and vicious language. That’s one road. And people may enjoy your writing. The thing that’s sacrificed is any sense of a larger responsibility, and any aesthetic consistency. I don’t think anyone is following that model right now—just being a complete jerk.

Well, Rex Reed is still writing.
Ah. Well, you can also be a standard bearer, and insist that work doesn’t measure up to your high standards. But I think the art makes the standards. I’m not going to sit there and say, “This is the way you do Shakespeare.” I believe that every play establishes its own standards, and our job is to just evaluate it. But everybody’s looking for the formula for how to talk about culture so that people who don’t have any time to read want to read about it. Is there something beyond thumbs-up, thumbs-down criticism? I would hope there’s a way to talk about a theatre event in real time—meaning while it’s still going on—in a way that’s engaging, funny, witty, and evaluates the elements of the thing. But it’s like if you had a friend who was like, “Gee, are you working out? You look great. But that’s a terrible haircut.” Nobody wants that person around.
~ Time Out’s 17-Year Theatre Critic, David Cote, Upon His Exit

“Now I am awake to the world. I was asleep before. When they slaughtered Congress, we didn’t wake up. When they blamed terrorists and suspended the Constitution, we didn’t wake up either. They said it would be temporary. Nothing changes instantaneously. In a gradually heating bathtub you’d be boiled to death before you knew it.”
“The Handmaid’s Tale,” Bruce Miller