MCN Curated Headlines Archive for March, 2012

NY Times

“You can say no. You can not be the object of ridicule.”
Peter Dinklage On Making The Right Choices

indie wire

“If we can’t agree that folks who quietly flouted Prohibition in private (or who smoke weed at home today, for that matter) weren’t (aren’t) evil-enabling scumbags, then there’s just no common ground here.”
D’Angelo Doubles Down Against Those Who Say He Shouldn’t Download Movies Illegally

NY Times

“This Disney Theatrical Productions adaptation of the 1992 Disney movie musical is made up largely of numbers that feel like blazing banner headlines. And if none of them quite match the immortal panache of the New York Post classic ‘Headless Body in Topless Bar,’ you have to give their creators points for consistency.”
“Newsies”: The Pan

wsj

“If your kid comes out of the bedroom and says he just shut down the government, he should have an outfit for that.”
Some Quality Time With John Waters

nymag

“Seems every competitor and enemy piling on with lies and libels. So bad, easy to hit back hard, which preparing.”
Rupert Murdoch Takes Case To Twitter

MCN Curated Headlines

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“There are critics who see their job as to be on the side of the artist, or in a state of imaginative sympathy or alliance with the artist. I think it’s important for a critic to be populist in the sense that we’re on the side of the public. I think one of the reasons is, frankly, capitalism. Whether you’re talking about restaurants or you’re talking about movies, you’re talking about large-scale commercial enterprises that are trying to sell themselves and market themselves and publicize themselves. A critic is, in a way, offering consumer advice. I think it’s very, very important in a time where everything is commercialized, commodified, and branded, where advertising is constantly bleeding into other forms of discourse, for there to be an independent voice kind of speaking to—and to some extent on behalf of—the public.”
~ A. O. Scott On One Role Of The Critic

“Every night, we’d sit and talk for a long, long time and talk about the process and I knew he was very, very intrigued about what could be happening. Then of course, one of the fascinating things he told me about was how he had readers who were reading for him that never knew it was Stanley Kubrick. So if he heard of a novel, he would send it out to people. I think he did it through newspaper ads at the time. And he would send it out to people and ask for a kind of synopsis or a critique of the novel. And he would read those. And it was done anonymously. But he said there were housewives and there were barristers and all sorts of people doing that. And I thought, yeah, that’s a really good way to open up the possibilities. Because otherwise, you’re randomly looking, walking through a bookstore or an airport. I said, “How many people are doing this?” It was about 30 people.”
~ George Miller’s Conversations With Kubrick