MCN Curated Headlines Archive for January, 2012

daily beast

“I’d been married 10 years when I started writing it and I was certainly asking a kind of existential question that I think people ask when they’ve been married that long: what is the perfect love?”
“Her Madgesty” Expands The Universe With W. E.

“You know, we’re talking about maybe 10 or 12 bloggers who have left out of 135, we still have 120 bloggers. It’s not a question of having well-known people or not. We’ll just have quality blogs.”
Huffington Post Quebec Loses Writers Who Decided Not To For Le Free

NY Times

“I’m dazzled by this director.”
Sean Penn Talks Sorrentino At Sundance

LA Times

Good Bye, You Sunk My Franchise
Universal Sez No Mo’ Hasbro

“Hi. I’m Tim Heidecker the “star” of The Comedy. There is clearly a destructive agenda running through the piece, starting with the incendiary, hyperbolic, misrepresentative title of the article.”
Commenters Illuminate Small Blog Entry About Response To The Comedy Screening At Sundance

“We will lose a lot of little theaters around the country.”
From The Arthouse Convergence, Good Dr. Bordwell On Pandora’s Digital Box

MCN Curated Headlines

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“There are critics who see their job as to be on the side of the artist, or in a state of imaginative sympathy or alliance with the artist. I think it’s important for a critic to be populist in the sense that we’re on the side of the public. I think one of the reasons is, frankly, capitalism. Whether you’re talking about restaurants or you’re talking about movies, you’re talking about large-scale commercial enterprises that are trying to sell themselves and market themselves and publicize themselves. A critic is, in a way, offering consumer advice. I think it’s very, very important in a time where everything is commercialized, commodified, and branded, where advertising is constantly bleeding into other forms of discourse, for there to be an independent voice kind of speaking to—and to some extent on behalf of—the public.”
~ A. O. Scott On One Role Of The Critic

“Every night, we’d sit and talk for a long, long time and talk about the process and I knew he was very, very intrigued about what could be happening. Then of course, one of the fascinating things he told me about was how he had readers who were reading for him that never knew it was Stanley Kubrick. So if he heard of a novel, he would send it out to people. I think he did it through newspaper ads at the time. And he would send it out to people and ask for a kind of synopsis or a critique of the novel. And he would read those. And it was done anonymously. But he said there were housewives and there were barristers and all sorts of people doing that. And I thought, yeah, that’s a really good way to open up the possibilities. Because otherwise, you’re randomly looking, walking through a bookstore or an airport. I said, “How many people are doing this?” It was about 30 people.”
~ George Miller’s Conversations With Kubrick