MCN Curated Headlines Archive for January, 2012

daily beast

“I’d been married 10 years when I started writing it and I was certainly asking a kind of existential question that I think people ask when they’ve been married that long: what is the perfect love?”
“Her Madgesty” Expands The Universe With W. E.

“You know, we’re talking about maybe 10 or 12 bloggers who have left out of 135, we still have 120 bloggers. It’s not a question of having well-known people or not. We’ll just have quality blogs.”
Huffington Post Quebec Loses Writers Who Decided Not To For Le Free

NY Times

“I’m dazzled by this director.”
Sean Penn Talks Sorrentino At Sundance

LA Times

Good Bye, You Sunk My Franchise
Universal Sez No Mo’ Hasbro

“Hi. I’m Tim Heidecker the “star” of The Comedy. There is clearly a destructive agenda running through the piece, starting with the incendiary, hyperbolic, misrepresentative title of the article.”
Commenters Illuminate Small Blog Entry About Response To The Comedy Screening At Sundance

“We will lose a lot of little theaters around the country.”
From The Arthouse Convergence, Good Dr. Bordwell On Pandora’s Digital Box

MCN Curated Headlines

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“I am just grateful I am still around. I would love to be Steven Soderbergh, but I am lucky to be Joe Swanberg. Actors want to work with me, people want to give me money, and my nightmare scenario remains: Getting in bed with a studio, spending years on a movie, and it turns out horrible, but now I’m rich.”

Actually, by Hollywood standards, you’re right, I said. That is unambitious.

“It is, and yet, if you can go to bed happy at night, doing what you want, isn’t that ambition for a lifetime?”
~ Swanberg On Swanberg By Borelli

“In retrospect, nothing of that kind surprised me about Philip, because his intuition was luminous from the instant you met him. So was his intelligence. A lot of actors act intelligent, but Philip was the real thing: a shining, artistic polymath with an intelligence that came at you like a pair of headlights and enveloped you from the moment he grabbed your hand, put a huge arm round your neck and shoved a cheek against yours; or if the mood took him, hugged you to him like a big, pudgy schoolboy, then stood and beamed at you while he took stock of the effect.”
John le Carré on Philip Seymour Hoffman