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MCN Curated Headlines Archive for January, 2012

daily beast

“I’d been married 10 years when I started writing it and I was certainly asking a kind of existential question that I think people ask when they’ve been married that long: what is the perfect love?”
“Her Madgesty” Expands The Universe With W. E.

“You know, we’re talking about maybe 10 or 12 bloggers who have left out of 135, we still have 120 bloggers. It’s not a question of having well-known people or not. We’ll just have quality blogs.”
Huffington Post Quebec Loses Writers Who Decided Not To For Le Free

NY Times

“I’m dazzled by this director.”
Sean Penn Talks Sorrentino At Sundance

LA Times

Good Bye, You Sunk My Franchise
Universal Sez No Mo’ Hasbro

“Hi. I’m Tim Heidecker the “star” of The Comedy. There is clearly a destructive agenda running through the piece, starting with the incendiary, hyperbolic, misrepresentative title of the article.”
Commenters Illuminate Small Blog Entry About Response To The Comedy Screening At Sundance

“We will lose a lot of little theaters around the country.”
From The Arthouse Convergence, Good Dr. Bordwell On Pandora’s Digital Box

MCN Curated Headlines

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“Cyberspace is a literary invention and does not really exist, however much time we spend on the computer every day. There is no such space radically different from the empirical, material room we are sitting in, nor do we leave our bodies behind when we enter it, something one rather tends to associate with drugs or the rapture. But it is a literary construction we tend to believe in; and, like the concept of immaterial labor, there are certainly historical reasons for its appearance at the dawn of postmodernity which greatly transcend the technological fact of computer development or the invention of the Internet.”
~ Fredric Jameson On William Gibson, Cyberspace and “Neuromancer”

“At one point in the comedy dead zone known as Seth MacFarlane’s Ted 2, the title character—a stuffed toy bear voiced by Mr. MacFarlane—and his dimwitted best friend, John (Mark Wahlberg), visit a comedy club to engage in a favorite pastime: throwing bleak improv ideas at the comics onstage. So, seated in the back of the auditorium while cloaked in darkness, the friends start shouting out suggestions like 9/11, Robin Williams and Charlie Hebdo to the unnerved comics. The topics don’t mean anything to Ted and John, who, like Mr. MacFarlane, take great pleasure in making others squirm. They could have just as easily yelled gang rape, the Holocaust and dead puppies.”
Manohla Dargis on Ted 2

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