MCN Curated Headlines Archive for November, 2011

guardian

“I suppose when I was writing ‘V for Vendetta’ I would in my secret heart of hearts have thought: wouldn’t it be great if these ideas actually made an impact? So when you start to see that idle fantasy intrude on the regular world… It’s peculiar. It feels like a character I created 30 years ago has somehow escaped the realm of fiction.”
Alan Moore On That Newly-Ubiquitous Mask

hollywoodreporter.com

Tom Hardy Talks DKR Battle Royale…But To Whom?
Because In 2011, Does Keeping An Exclusive To Your Print Magazine Mean That Content Theft Of That Print Content By Online Entities Is Okay?
The Actual Source Of The Now-Oft-Ripped-Off Content

“For 13 years I sat in a rented room. The phone didn’t ring. That’s a humbling, lonely, exhausting, disgusting, terrible place to be. I thought the dance was over, but I wasn’t going to give it up. I went to the psychiatrist, I kept going to the gym, I kept thinking, ‘Okay, tomorrow I’m going to turn it around’.”
More Rourke Raillery

“What is the state there for unless it is there to help us in the social sphere and the sphere of culture?”
Aleksandr Sokurov’s “Faustian” Pact With Putin

NY Times

“I really surprised myself. You know that scene in Star Wars? Luke and Solo—I don’t even know their names—are about to be squashed in that thing. That’s what I felt like every day on the set. Like I was being pressed up against the wall of my own abilities.”
Cathy Horyn Mash-Notes Lunch With Michelle Williams

NY Times

“The searing images of that day were dictated by Mr. Wicker from a phone booth in stark, detailed prose drawn from notes scribbled on a White House itinerary sheet. It filled two front-page columns and the entire second page.”
Tom Wicker, 85, Only NYT Journalist In Dallas When JFK Assassinated; Became DC Bureau Chief And Op-Edder

“People don’t live on top of each other in apartments. There’s a house every mile and a half apart, and you’re in four feet of ice. It’s unbelievable. There’s a reason this doesn’t take place in Cleveland.”
Fincher On Dragon Tattoo‘s Location

“I wish I could brand the movies in a way so they would just look at the page and trust me rather than a critic or anything else.”
AP: “Harvey Weinstein Seeks To Raise Company’s Profile”

MCN Curated Headlines

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“I was 15 when I first watched Sally Hardesty escape into the back of a pickup truck, covered in blood and cackling like a goddamn witch. All of her friends were dead. She had been kidnapped, tortured and even forced to feed her own blood to her cannibalistic captors’ impossibly shriveled patriarch. Being new to the horror genre, I was sure she was going to die. It had been a few months since I survived a violent sexual assault, where I subsequently ran from my assailant, tripped, fell and fought like hell. I crawled home with bloody knees, makeup-stained cheeks and a new void in both my mind and heart. My sense of safety, my ability to trust others, my willingness to form new relationships and my love of spending time with people I cared about were all taken from me. It wasn’t until I found the original The Texas Chain Saw Massacre that something clicked. It was Sally’s strength, and her resilience. It was watching her survive blows to the head from a hammer. It was watching her break free from her bonds and burst through a glass window. It was watching her get back up after she’d been stabbed. It was watching her crawl into the back of a truck, laughing as it drove away from Leatherface. She was the last one to confront the killer, and live. I remember sitting in front of the TV and thinking, There I am. That’s me.”
~ Lauren Milici On “The Final Girl”

“‘Thriller’ enforced its own reality principle; it was there, part of the every commute, a serenade to every errand, a referent to every purchase, a fact of every life. You didn’t have to like it, you only had to acknowledge it. By July 6, 1984, when the Jacksons played the first show of their ‘Victory’ tour, in Kansas City, Missouri, Jacksonism had produced a system of commodification so complete that whatever and whoever was admitted to it instantly became a new commodity. People were no longer comsuming commodities as such things are conventionally understood (records, videos, posters, books, magazines, key rings, earrings necklaces pins buttons wigs voice-altering devices Pepsis t-shirts underwear hats scarves gloves jackets – and why were there no jeans called Bille Jeans?); they were consuming their own gestures of consumption. That is, they were consuming not a Tayloristic Michael Jackson, or any licensed facsimile, but themselves. Riding a Mobius strip of pure capitalism, that was the transubstantiation.”
~ Greil Marcus On Michael Jackson