MCN Curated Headlines Archive for November, 2011

guardian

“I suppose when I was writing ‘V for Vendetta’ I would in my secret heart of hearts have thought: wouldn’t it be great if these ideas actually made an impact? So when you start to see that idle fantasy intrude on the regular world… It’s peculiar. It feels like a character I created 30 years ago has somehow escaped the realm of fiction.”
Alan Moore On That Newly-Ubiquitous Mask

hollywoodreporter.com

Tom Hardy Talks DKR Battle Royale…But To Whom?
Because In 2011, Does Keeping An Exclusive To Your Print Magazine Mean That Content Theft Of That Print Content By Online Entities Is Okay?
The Actual Source Of The Now-Oft-Ripped-Off Content

“For 13 years I sat in a rented room. The phone didn’t ring. That’s a humbling, lonely, exhausting, disgusting, terrible place to be. I thought the dance was over, but I wasn’t going to give it up. I went to the psychiatrist, I kept going to the gym, I kept thinking, ‘Okay, tomorrow I’m going to turn it around’.”
More Rourke Raillery

“What is the state there for unless it is there to help us in the social sphere and the sphere of culture?”
Aleksandr Sokurov’s “Faustian” Pact With Putin

NY Times

“I really surprised myself. You know that scene in Star Wars? Luke and Solo—I don’t even know their names—are about to be squashed in that thing. That’s what I felt like every day on the set. Like I was being pressed up against the wall of my own abilities.”
Cathy Horyn Mash-Notes Lunch With Michelle Williams

NY Times

“The searing images of that day were dictated by Mr. Wicker from a phone booth in stark, detailed prose drawn from notes scribbled on a White House itinerary sheet. It filled two front-page columns and the entire second page.”
Tom Wicker, 85, Only NYT Journalist In Dallas When JFK Assassinated; Became DC Bureau Chief And Op-Edder

“People don’t live on top of each other in apartments. There’s a house every mile and a half apart, and you’re in four feet of ice. It’s unbelievable. There’s a reason this doesn’t take place in Cleveland.”
Fincher On Dragon Tattoo‘s Location

“I wish I could brand the movies in a way so they would just look at the page and trust me rather than a critic or anything else.”
AP: “Harvey Weinstein Seeks To Raise Company’s Profile”

MCN Curated Headlines

Quote Unquotesee all »

“BATTLE OF THE SEXES: Politics and queerness as spectacle/spectacle as politics and queerness. Pretty delightful, lovely, erotic. A-

“Not since EASY A and CABARET have I seen Emma Stone give a real sense of her range. Here, she has pathos and interiority and desire. I love the cinematography and the ways in which the images of the tennis icons are refracted and manipulated via various surfaces/mediators. Also, wild how a haircut is one of the most erotic scenes in cinema this year. Spine tinglingly tactile that feels refreshing. Proof that *cough* you don’t need to be ~graphic/explicit~ to be erotic *cough*. Also, it made me want to get into tennis. Watching it, at least.

“There are interesting touches and intimations as to the cinematic nature of sports, & unpacking the formal approach of broadcasting sports.Also, I was here for Sarah Silverman smoking. And also, hi Mickey Sumner!! It’s a really interesting film about the ways in which public spectacle is never apolitical, and how spectacle is prone to assignation.

“There’s this one other scene from BATTLE OF THE SEXES that I love, and it’s the one in the bar. You see Billie looking after Marilyn as she dances. Through a crowd. There’s a paradoxical closeness and distance between them. In the purple light, and the kitschy decor, everything is distorted. But Billie catches a glance and you can feel the nervous swell inside.”
~ Kyle Turner

“Our business is complicated because intimacy is part and parcel of our profession; as actors we are paid to do very intimate things in public. That’s why someone can have the audacity to invite you to their home or hotel and you show up. Precisely because of this we must stay vigilant and ensure that the professional intimacy is not abused. I hope we are in a pivotal moment where a sisterhood — and brotherhood of allies — is being formed in our industry. I hope we can form a community where a woman can speak up about abuse and not suffer another abuse by not being believed and instead being ridiculed. That’s why we don’t speak up — for fear of suffering twice, and for fear of being labeled and characterized by our moment of powerlessness. Though we may have endured powerlessness at the hands of Harvey Weinstein, by speaking up, speaking out and speaking together, we regain that power. And we hopefully ensure that this kind of rampant predatory behavior as an accepted feature of our industry dies here and now. Now that we are speaking, let us never shut up about this kind of thing. I speak up to make certain that this is not the kind of misconduct that deserves a second chance. I speak up to contribute to the end of the conspiracy of silence.”
Lupita Nyong’o