MCN Curated Headlines Archive for November, 2011

guardian

“I suppose when I was writing ‘V for Vendetta’ I would in my secret heart of hearts have thought: wouldn’t it be great if these ideas actually made an impact? So when you start to see that idle fantasy intrude on the regular world… It’s peculiar. It feels like a character I created 30 years ago has somehow escaped the realm of fiction.”
Alan Moore On That Newly-Ubiquitous Mask

hollywoodreporter.com

Tom Hardy Talks DKR Battle Royale…But To Whom?
Because - In 2011, Does Keeping An Exclusive To Your Print Magazine Mean That Content Theft Of That Print Content By Online Entities Is Okay?
The Actual Source Of The Now-Oft-Ripped-Off Content

“For 13 years I sat in a rented room. The phone didn’t ring. That’s a humbling, lonely, exhausting, disgusting, terrible place to be. I thought the dance was over, but I wasn’t going to give it up. I went to the psychiatrist, I kept going to the gym, I kept thinking, ‘Okay, tomorrow I’m going to turn it around’.”
More Rourke Raillery

“What is the state there for unless it is there to help us in the social sphere and the sphere of culture?”
Aleksandr Sokurov’s “Faustian” Pact With Putin

NY Times

“I really surprised myself. You know that scene in Star Wars? Luke and Solo—I don’t even know their names—are about to be squashed in that thing. That’s what I felt like every day on the set. Like I was being pressed up against the wall of my own abilities.”
Cathy Horyn Mash-Notes Lunch With Michelle Williams

NY Times

“The searing images of that day were dictated by Mr. Wicker from a phone booth in stark, detailed prose drawn from notes scribbled on a White House itinerary sheet. It filled two front-page columns and the entire second page.”
Tom Wicker, 85, Only NYT Journalist In Dallas When JFK Assassinated; Became DC Bureau Chief And Op-Edder

“People don’t live on top of each other in apartments. There’s a house every mile and a half apart, and you’re in four feet of ice. It’s unbelievable. There’s a reason this doesn’t take place in Cleveland.”
Fincher On Dragon Tattoo‘s Location

“I wish I could brand the movies in a way so they would just look at the page and trust me rather than a critic or anything else.”
AP: “Harvey Weinstein Seeks To Raise Company’s Profile”

MCN Curated Headlines

Quote Unquotesee all »

“Yes, good movies sprout up, inevitably, in the cracks and seams between the tectonic plates on which all of these franchises stay balanced, and we are reassured of their hardiness. But we don’t see what we don’t see; we don’t see the effort, or the cost of the effort, or the movies of which we’re deprived because of the cost of the effort. Paul Thomas Anderson’s Inherent Vice may have come from a studio, but it still required a substantial chunk of outside financing, and at $35 million, it’s not even that expensive. No studio could find the $8.5 million it cost Dan Gilroy to make Nightcrawler. Birdman cost a mere $18 million and still had to scrape that together at the last minute. Imagine American movie culture for the last few years without Her or Foxcatcher or American Hustle or The Master or Zero Dark Thirty and it suddenly looks markedly more frail—and those movies exist only because of the fairy godmothership of independent producer Megan Ellison. The grace of billionaires is not a great business model on which to hang the hopes of an art form.”
~ Mark Harris On The State Of The Movies

How do you make a Top Ten list? For tax and organizational purposes, I keep a log of every movie I see (Title, year, director, exhibition format, and location the film was viewed in). Anything with an asterisk to the left of its title means it’s a 2014 release (or something I saw at a festival which is somehow in play for the year). If there’s a performance, or sequence, or line of dialogue, even, that strikes me in a certain way, I’ll make a note of it. So when year end consideration time (that is, the month and change out of the year where I feel valued) rolls around, it’s a little easier to go through and pull some contenders for categories. For 2014, I’m voting in three polls: Indiewire, SEFCA (my critics’ guild), and the Muriels. Since Indiewire was first, it required the most consternation. There were lots of films that I simply never had a chance to see, so I just went with my gut. SEFCA requires a lot of hemming and hawing and trying to be strategic, even though there’s none of the in-person skullduggery that I hear of from folk whose critics’ guild is all in the same city. The Muriels is the most fun to contribute to because it’s after the meat market phase of awards season. Also, because it’s at the beginning of next year, I’ll generally have been able to see everything I wanted to by then. I love making hierarchical lists, partially because they are so subjective and mercurial. Every critical proclamation is based on who you are at that moment and what experiences you’ve had up until that point. So they change, and that’s okay. It’s all a weird game of timing and emotional waveforms, and I’m sure a scientist could do an in-depth dissection of the process that leads to the discovery of shocking trends in collective evaluation. But I love the year end awards crush, because I feel somewhat respected and because I have a wild-and-wooly work schedule that has me bouncing around the city to screenings, or power viewing the screeners I get sent.
Jason Shawhan of Nashville Scene Answers CriticWire