MCN Curated Headlines Archive for November, 2011

guardian

“I suppose when I was writing ‘V for Vendetta’ I would in my secret heart of hearts have thought: wouldn’t it be great if these ideas actually made an impact? So when you start to see that idle fantasy intrude on the regular world… It’s peculiar. It feels like a character I created 30 years ago has somehow escaped the realm of fiction.”
Alan Moore On That Newly-Ubiquitous Mask

hollywoodreporter.com

Tom Hardy Talks DKR Battle Royale…But To Whom?
Because In 2011, Does Keeping An Exclusive To Your Print Magazine Mean That Content Theft Of That Print Content By Online Entities Is Okay?
The Actual Source Of The Now-Oft-Ripped-Off Content

“For 13 years I sat in a rented room. The phone didn’t ring. That’s a humbling, lonely, exhausting, disgusting, terrible place to be. I thought the dance was over, but I wasn’t going to give it up. I went to the psychiatrist, I kept going to the gym, I kept thinking, ‘Okay, tomorrow I’m going to turn it around’.”
More Rourke Raillery

“What is the state there for unless it is there to help us in the social sphere and the sphere of culture?”
Aleksandr Sokurov’s “Faustian” Pact With Putin

NY Times

“I really surprised myself. You know that scene in Star Wars? Luke and Solo—I don’t even know their names—are about to be squashed in that thing. That’s what I felt like every day on the set. Like I was being pressed up against the wall of my own abilities.”
Cathy Horyn Mash-Notes Lunch With Michelle Williams

NY Times

“The searing images of that day were dictated by Mr. Wicker from a phone booth in stark, detailed prose drawn from notes scribbled on a White House itinerary sheet. It filled two front-page columns and the entire second page.”
Tom Wicker, 85, Only NYT Journalist In Dallas When JFK Assassinated; Became DC Bureau Chief And Op-Edder

“People don’t live on top of each other in apartments. There’s a house every mile and a half apart, and you’re in four feet of ice. It’s unbelievable. There’s a reason this doesn’t take place in Cleveland.”
Fincher On Dragon Tattoo‘s Location

“I wish I could brand the movies in a way so they would just look at the page and trust me rather than a critic or anything else.”
AP: “Harvey Weinstein Seeks To Raise Company’s Profile”

MCN Curated Headlines

Quote Unquotesee all »

“There are critics who see their job as to be on the side of the artist, or in a state of imaginative sympathy or alliance with the artist. I think it’s important for a critic to be populist in the sense that we’re on the side of the public. I think one of the reasons is, frankly, capitalism. Whether you’re talking about restaurants or you’re talking about movies, you’re talking about large-scale commercial enterprises that are trying to sell themselves and market themselves and publicize themselves. A critic is, in a way, offering consumer advice. I think it’s very, very important in a time where everything is commercialized, commodified, and branded, where advertising is constantly bleeding into other forms of discourse, for there to be an independent voice kind of speaking to—and to some extent on behalf of—the public.”
~ A. O. Scott On One Role Of The Critic

“Every night, we’d sit and talk for a long, long time and talk about the process and I knew he was very, very intrigued about what could be happening. Then of course, one of the fascinating things he told me about was how he had readers who were reading for him that never knew it was Stanley Kubrick. So if he heard of a novel, he would send it out to people. I think he did it through newspaper ads at the time. And he would send it out to people and ask for a kind of synopsis or a critique of the novel. And he would read those. And it was done anonymously. But he said there were housewives and there were barristers and all sorts of people doing that. And I thought, yeah, that’s a really good way to open up the possibilities. Because otherwise, you’re randomly looking, walking through a bookstore or an airport. I said, “How many people are doing this?” It was about 30 people.”
~ George Miller’s Conversations With Kubrick