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MCN Curated Headlines Archive for November, 2011

110 Features From 31 Countries
88 World Premieres
46 First-Timers
4,042 Feature Submissions
Sundance 2012 Announces Films In Competition

BBC

“We have to react against the theme park film, as well made as they are, and as enjoyable as some of them are.”
Marty Says: Don’t Take The Ride

Early Voters Give Out Only One Award For A Film Not Seen Or Released By October 1
NYFCC Announces The Early Winners

The Artist vs The Descendants is the story in another year of all big indies duking it out
Indies Spirit Noms Announced

“The film must be refused classification because it contains gratuitous, exploitative or offensive depictions of violence with a very high degree of impact and cruelty which has a high impact. Films classified RC cannot be sold, hired, or advertised in Australia.”
Oz Censors Refuse Human Centipede 2‘s Refuse

“Much of the drama emerges through the interstices of the tensely unfolding scenes of emotional writhing and indecision; the sixty-nine-minute sketchbook implies a novelistic amplitude of experience.”
Sounds Like Richard Brody Likes What’s Likely 2011’s Last Joe Swanberg Joint

MCN Curated Headlines

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Quote Unquotesee all »

“Cyberspace is a literary invention and does not really exist, however much time we spend on the computer every day. There is no such space radically different from the empirical, material room we are sitting in, nor do we leave our bodies behind when we enter it, something one rather tends to associate with drugs or the rapture. But it is a literary construction we tend to believe in; and, like the concept of immaterial labor, there are certainly historical reasons for its appearance at the dawn of postmodernity which greatly transcend the technological fact of computer development or the invention of the Internet.”
~ Fredric Jameson On William Gibson, Cyberspace and “Neuromancer”

“At one point in the comedy dead zone known as Seth MacFarlane’s Ted 2, the title character—a stuffed toy bear voiced by Mr. MacFarlane—and his dimwitted best friend, John (Mark Wahlberg), visit a comedy club to engage in a favorite pastime: throwing bleak improv ideas at the comics onstage. So, seated in the back of the auditorium while cloaked in darkness, the friends start shouting out suggestions like 9/11, Robin Williams and Charlie Hebdo to the unnerved comics. The topics don’t mean anything to Ted and John, who, like Mr. MacFarlane, take great pleasure in making others squirm. They could have just as easily yelled gang rape, the Holocaust and dead puppies.”
Manohla Dargis on Ted 2

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