MCN Curated Headlines Archive for May, 2011

NY Times

MSNBC Asserts: “Fake Dragon Tattoo Trailer Is Fake”
But – NYT: Sony Sez Probably Pirated Off U.S. Screen, Using Same Evidence
Oh, Wait – Salon Has Precisely The Same Conclusions!
While – THR Quotes A Buncha Bloggers And Cites Unnamed Sony Spokesperson With No Direct Quotes
Plus – “From a media perspective, it’s dealing in bad faith. Web sites and studios have an implicit agreement to work on the latter’s schedules; we withhold obviously pirated or leaked material until an authorized, theoretically superior version is available. It basically reduces us to another Hollywood marketing arm, but at least we have the prerogative to tell you if the campaign is stinky or ineffective.”
Vanairsdale On The Implications If It’s All A Salander-Fashioned “Hack”

NY Times

“There is something flattering and exciting about the permanence of paper, and we committed to doing serious journalism at a time when there has been this onslaught of hit-and-run bloggers.”
Carr Media-Equates Janice Min’s H’wd Reporter

LA Times

Raiders was the first movie where I actually shot the movie without thinking. I like to say that the line that most typifies the production of that movie was when Harrison says, ‘I’m making this up as I go along.'”
Spielberg On Raiders At 30

“He plays the role of the dedicated artist convincingly. This makes it extremely difficult for critics to believe that a man so devoted to his creations, so uninterested in grosses or the trappings of fame, could actually be quite an inept filmmaker. But such is the case. It has to be said: There is something mulish about his sophomorism, something stupefying about his work.”
Schickel Takes To Outlet Less Known Than Time To Point Pop Gun At Tree Of Life; Invokes, Yes, Preston Sturges’ 70-Year-Old Gag About The “Deep-Dish Movie”

NY Times

“Audiences are very smart. When they smell something aspiring to be more than it is, they catch on very quickly.”
3D! We Hardly Knew Ye!

NY Times

Serious-Funny x 2
“I’m a terrible actor,” he said, eating scrambled eggs. “I’m too self-conscious. I’m not a fan of me,” Mr. Ayoade said, “and I can’t become one.”
Richard Ayoade, The Quietly Self-Deprecating Mind Behind The Beguiling Submarine
And – Mike Mills On The Start Of Beginners

MCN Curated Headlines

Elan Mastai On “The First Time I Got Paid To Write”

“A lot of kids think cartooning is something that pours out of your hand and onto the page. But it’s a lot of work to look like that. People have approached me for a documentary. And I say, ‘You’re going to watch me at a desk, staring, then cursing every few hours. It really is a goofy job.”

William Grimes On Independent Producer Robin O’Hara, Who Was 62

Why Drive-Ins Were More Than Just Movie Theaters

“We’ve got this mixed rights situation and what fixes that is money,” Reed Hastings continued. “Because we’d like to be able to get global rights so everybody gets the same great experience. And our originals, are like that, where everybody gets access. But it’s going to take a lot more money than we have now.”

Blacklisted Screenwriter Jean Rouverol Was 100; Was W.C. Fields’ Daughter In It’s A Gift

“For young black horror filmmakers, if you have a script, reach out and I’ll try to help it get made. Monkeypaw Productions is my production company and we’re really trying to promote untapped voices in genre. I think the reason we don’t see more films about the African American experience is because we haven’t nurtured black talent, we haven’t encouraged young black filmmakers to dream big. When you have that, that’s when you have this systemic problem where artists aren’t getting their platforms, aren’t given their platforms. Some stories it’s impossible for a white person to tell.”

Writers Guild Seeks May 1 Strike Authorization

Brit Director Michael Tuchner, 84, Films Include Villain, “Summer Of My German Soldier”

“My Life As Bob Silvers’ Assistant”

Quote Unquotesee all »

“Let me try and be as direct as I possibly can with you on this. There was no relationship to repair. I didn’t intend for Harvey to buy and release The Immigrant – I thought it was a terrible idea. And I didn’t think he would want the film, and I didn’t think he would like the film. He bought the film without me knowing! He bought it from the equity people who raised the money for me in the States. And I told them it was a terrible idea, but I had no say over the matter. So they sold it to him without my say-so, and with me thinking it was a terrible idea. I was completely correct, but I couldn’t do anything about it. It was not my preference, it was not my choice, I did not want that to happen, I have no relationship with Harvey. So, it’s not like I repaired some relationship, then he screwed me again, and I’m an idiot for trusting him twice! Like I say, you try to distance yourself as much as possible from the immediate response to a movie. With The Immigrant I had final cut. So he knew he couldn’t make me change it. But he applied all the pressure he could, including shelving the film.”
James Gray

“I’m an unusual producer because I control the destiny of a lot of the films I’ve done. Most of them are in perfect states of restoration and preservation and distribution, and I aim to keep them in distribution. HanWay Films, which is my sales company, has a 500-film catalogue, which is looked after and tended like a garden. I’m still looking after my films in the catalogue and trying to get other people to look after their films, which we represent intellectually, to try to keep them alive. A film has to be run through a projector to be alive, unfortunately, and those electric shadows are few and far between now. It’s very hard to go and see films in a movie house. I was always involved with the sales and marketing of my films, right up from The Shout onwards. I’ve had good periods, but I also had a best period because the film business was in its best period then. You couldn’t make The Last Emperor today. You couldn’t make The Sheltering Sky today. You couldn’t make those films anymore as independent films. There are neither the resources nor the vision within the studios to go to them and say, “I want to make a film about China with no stars in it.”Then, twenty years ago, I thought, “OK, I’m going to sell my own films but I don’t want to make it my own sales company.” I wanted it to be for me but I wanted to make it open for every other producer, so they don’t feel that they make a film but I get the focus. So, it’s a company that is my business and I’m involved with running it in a certain way, but I’m not seen as a competitor with other people that use it. It’s used by lots of different producers apart from me. When I want to use it, however, it’s there for me and I suppose I’m planning to continue making all my films to be sold by HanWay. I don’t have to, but I do because it’s in my building and the marketing’s here, and I can do it like that. Often, it sounds like I’m being easy about things, but it’s much more difficult than it sounds. It’s just that I’ve been at it for a long time and there’s lots of fat and security around my business. I know how to make films, but it’s not easy—it’s become a very exacting life.”
~ Producer Jeremy Thomas