MCN Curated Headlines Archive for May, 2011

NY Times

MSNBC Asserts: “Fake Dragon Tattoo Trailer Is Fake”
But – NYT: Sony Sez Probably Pirated Off U.S. Screen, Using Same Evidence
Oh, Wait – Salon Has Precisely The Same Conclusions!
While – THR Quotes A Buncha Bloggers And Cites Unnamed Sony Spokesperson With No Direct Quotes
Plus – “From a media perspective, it’s dealing in bad faith. Web sites and studios have an implicit agreement to work on the latter’s schedules; we withhold obviously pirated or leaked material until an authorized, theoretically superior version is available. It basically reduces us to another Hollywood marketing arm, but at least we have the prerogative to tell you if the campaign is stinky or ineffective.”
Vanairsdale On The Implications If It’s All A Salander-Fashioned “Hack”

NY Times

“There is something flattering and exciting about the permanence of paper, and we committed to doing serious journalism at a time when there has been this onslaught of hit-and-run bloggers.”
Carr Media-Equates Janice Min’s H’wd Reporter

LA Times

Raiders was the first movie where I actually shot the movie without thinking. I like to say that the line that most typifies the production of that movie was when Harrison says, ‘I’m making this up as I go along.'”
Spielberg On Raiders At 30

“He plays the role of the dedicated artist convincingly. This makes it extremely difficult for critics to believe that a man so devoted to his creations, so uninterested in grosses or the trappings of fame, could actually be quite an inept filmmaker. But such is the case. It has to be said: There is something mulish about his sophomorism, something stupefying about his work.”
Schickel Takes To Outlet Less Known Than Time To Point Pop Gun At Tree Of Life; Invokes, Yes, Preston Sturges’ 70-Year-Old Gag About The “Deep-Dish Movie”

NY Times

“Audiences are very smart. When they smell something aspiring to be more than it is, they catch on very quickly.”
3D! We Hardly Knew Ye!

NY Times

Serious-Funny x 2
“I’m a terrible actor,” he said, eating scrambled eggs. “I’m too self-conscious. I’m not a fan of me,” Mr. Ayoade said, “and I can’t become one.”
Richard Ayoade, The Quietly Self-Deprecating Mind Behind The Beguiling Submarine
And – Mike Mills On The Start Of Beginners

MCN Curated Headlines

Quote Unquotesee all »

“I don’t really believe in guilty pleasures. I like to subscribe to Susan Sontag’s thought of no highs and lows. I think dismissing popular culture and popular films can be really dangerous because they may seem innocuous, but some are works of art and even when they’re not they can say so much about the culture that they’re reflecting. This also gets into the idea of canon. What is good and isn’t good? Lately, I’ve been thinking a lot about that. Specifically, who writes these canons? Mainly, straight white guys — which basically rigs the system. So, if you have a knowledge of female filmmakers, queer filmmakers, African or Asian filmmakers, some people won’t give them the same culture capital. They’ll say, “Oh, that’s nice niche knowledge.” No, it’s not. You’re just seeing it through the prism of something white and male. Like Shonda Rhimes’ ‘Scandal.’ I love that show, but is it a guilty pleasure because it’s a soap on TV? No. I think it has incredible writing, incredible thought and characters, so we should take it seriously. That’s a long-winded answer to say, “Yes, I love Titanic.” I was 10 years old when it came out and my mom took me to see it three times. I was so obsessed with it. A big thanks to my mom who’ll never get those nine hours of her life back.”
~ Toronto Int’l Programmer and Critic Kiva Reardon

“A lot of us felt blindsided,” Van Vliet told me. In the seventies, Van Vliet was drafted out of film school by Industrial Light & Magic, where he worked on The Empire Strikes Back and Raiders of the Lost Ark. Now 62 and semi-retired, he said, “Once you get into your fifties, you’re pretty disposable.” Van Vliet was in the middle of reviewing DVD screeners before casting his Oscar votes, a process he estimated would take a hundred and twenty hours. “The Academy is essentially asking us to give them three weeks of labor, and then they’re going to take our results, put them into a ceremony, and sell it,” he said, referring to the seventy-five million dollars that the organization earns from the television broadcast. “Then they’re turning around and kicking us in the teeth.”
~ “Shakeup At The Oscars”