MCN Curated Headlines Archive for May, 2011

NY Times

MSNBC Asserts: “Fake Dragon Tattoo Trailer Is Fake”
But – NYT: Sony Sez Probably Pirated Off U.S. Screen, Using Same Evidence
Oh, Wait – Salon Has Precisely The Same Conclusions!
While – THR Quotes A Buncha Bloggers And Cites Unnamed Sony Spokesperson With No Direct Quotes
Plus – “From a media perspective, it’s dealing in bad faith. Web sites and studios have an implicit agreement to work on the latter’s schedules; we withhold obviously pirated or leaked material until an authorized, theoretically superior version is available. It basically reduces us to another Hollywood marketing arm, but at least we have the prerogative to tell you if the campaign is stinky or ineffective.”
Vanairsdale On The Implications If It’s All A Salander-Fashioned “Hack”

NY Times

“There is something flattering and exciting about the permanence of paper, and we committed to doing serious journalism at a time when there has been this onslaught of hit-and-run bloggers.”
Carr Media-Equates Janice Min’s H’wd Reporter

LA Times

Raiders was the first movie where I actually shot the movie without thinking. I like to say that the line that most typifies the production of that movie was when Harrison says, ‘I’m making this up as I go along.'”
Spielberg On Raiders At 30

“He plays the role of the dedicated artist convincingly. This makes it extremely difficult for critics to believe that a man so devoted to his creations, so uninterested in grosses or the trappings of fame, could actually be quite an inept filmmaker. But such is the case. It has to be said: There is something mulish about his sophomorism, something stupefying about his work.”
Schickel Takes To Outlet Less Known Than Time To Point Pop Gun At Tree Of Life; Invokes, Yes, Preston Sturges’ 70-Year-Old Gag About The “Deep-Dish Movie”

NY Times

“Audiences are very smart. When they smell something aspiring to be more than it is, they catch on very quickly.”
3D! We Hardly Knew Ye!

NY Times

Serious-Funny x 2
“I’m a terrible actor,” he said, eating scrambled eggs. “I’m too self-conscious. I’m not a fan of me,” Mr. Ayoade said, “and I can’t become one.”
Richard Ayoade, The Quietly Self-Deprecating Mind Behind The Beguiling Submarine
And – Mike Mills On The Start Of Beginners

MCN Curated Headlines

Troy on: Jan-Michael Vincent Was 73

eht% on: Kubrick by Weegee

Thawn Chwithy on: Topix Forums Deep-Nixed

Some Random Troll on: Topix Forums Deep-Nixed

Trenton Moore on: Philadelphia Film Critics Circle Nod Roma as Best Film, Cinematography and Foreign Film

Celia Ann Harrison on: Topix Forums Deep-Nixed

Celia Ann Harrison on: Topix Forums Deep-Nixed

Karen Christy on: Topix Forums Deep-Nixed

The Pope on: "ABC’s decision to cancel 'Roseanne' feels like a gutsy move. It looks like a stand against racism, a line drawn in the sand to delineate what is reasonable and what is not. It even looks like a data point in the 'How do we separate the art from the artist?' debate, and it offers a heartening answer: We don’t have to, because, in this case, ABC will not finance that artist. It’s somehow even more heartening because it comes from a massive corporate conglomerate that might lose money by making this decision. It feels remarkably just. It feels decent. I’m thrilled that Roseanne has been canceled. It was the right thing to do. But it doesn’t feel correct to hold up ABC as a new bastion of decency, either. 'Roseanne' felt like the Titanic, a ship that seemed too big to turn around — but in the aftermath of Barr’s tweet, it also seemed like a ship that was doomed. ABC’s decision to cancel Roseanne is a good thing, but it also seems like a decision to shut down something that was about to implode anyhow. With a little more context, it looks like a network taking a strong stance against racism… in a way that also rids them of a show that was about to fall apart anyhow."

Sergio on: "Even though the Marvel series are TV shows, Netflix has become entranced by this notion of the '13-hour movie' when developing a season. This format mashup does a disservice to both mediums. Television's strength lies in episodic structure, which allows writers to explore different tones, characters, story structure and conflict. Movies allow a filmmaker to hone in on one or two central themes, attack it from multiple angles and get out. Netflix’s model takes the most incompatible parts of each and slaps them together, creating a lumbering mutant medium. The '13-hour movie' model means we don’t get the brevity of a film or the variation of television; it means we get the singular focus of movies stretched out to television length. It’s exhausting and it does these heroes no favors."

Quote Unquotesee all »

“That’s the joke of Prune, that we just pretend to be a restaurant. But we’re actually an institute for living. We hide behind the fried eggs, and we hide behind the marrow bones, but really what we’re doing here is trying to change the whole goddamn world, one lamb chop at a time. It’s slow going, but I think we’re getting there.”
~ Gabrielle Hamilton

“I’m into pleasure rebellion,” she says, lighting a cigarette. “I’ve shared all my misery and tragedy but in my personal life I’m a cheerleader, an optimist. That aspect of myself is not shared. Once you are free from trauma, you are going to luxuriate in pleasure and happiness – personal pleasure. A divine gluttony, I should say.”
Lydia Lunch