MCN Curated Headlines Archive for July, 2010

“Like bottom feeder Charlie Kaufman, Mr. Nolan’s reputation as an arrogant maverick draws a first-rate cast of players… barely even remotely lucid… incomprehensible gibberish… sorry butt… jabbering twaddle… pretentious perplexity”
Great-Unka Rex Reed, The Charlie Callas Of Ad Homineh-Homineh-Hominem Movie Reviews, Rubs One Out Over Chris Nolan

The Gags Alone Make This Analysis Suspect: “Even Ishtar has its defenders—ironic, coquettish types who wink at you from behind their yashmaghs.”
“What Happened To The Box-Office Bomb?”

LA Times

“Murky and flat… commands a lot of admiration but doesn’t produce a commensurate level of enjoyment… cinematic Calamine lotion amid a swarm of mosquitoes.”
Zeitchick Sez He’s No Reviewer, Then Dismisses Inception At Length


“This country can only function with an independent media with access to what the government is doing. How is anybody to know what’s going on, if the media doesn’t have access to the story?”
NPR On The Suspension Of The Press In BP Gulf Oilspill Coverage
Plus – PBS’ “5 Digital PR Lessons From BP’s Oilspill Response”

“Harvey Pekar’s life was not an open book. It was an open comic book.”
The Cleveland Plain Dealer’s Obit
And Chef Ruhlman Says Goodbye To Fellow Clevelander

“There is no doubt that Polanski did what he did, which is have sex with a 13-year-old after plying her with booze. There is no doubt also that after all these years there is something stale about the case, not to mention a ‘victim’ who has long ago forgiven her assailant and dearly wishes the whole thing would go away. So do I.”
Annoying, Fustian Washington Post “Columnist” Richard Cohen Salutes Switzerland On “Freeing” Roman Polanski

telegraph.co.uk

“As an old prostitute once wearily complained at the end of a long shift, it’s not the work, it’s the stairs.”
Why Watch Theater On A Movie Screen?

telegraph.co.uk

“I have busy nights. If I wake up during a dream I can usually go back to sleep and finish the story.”
Marion Cotillard, Dreamer

telegraph.co.uk

“The internet’s like MTV. At one time MTV was hip and suddenly it became outdated. Anyway, all these computers and digital gadgets are no good. They just fill your head with numbers and that can’t be good for you.”
Prince Dances About The Internet

MCN Curated Headlines

Quote Unquotesee all »

“I’ve been pleasantly surprised by how many recappers, while clearly over their heads, are baseline sympathetic to finding themselves routinely unmoored, even if that means repeating over and over that this is closer to “avant-garde art” than  normal TV to meet the word count. My feed was busy connecting the dots to Peter Tscherkassky (gas station), Tony Conrad (the giant staring at feedback of what we’ve just seen), Pat O’Neill (bombs away) et al., and this is all apposite — visual and conceptual thinking along possibly inadvertent parallel lines. If recappers can’t find those exact reference points to latch onto, that speaks less to willful ignorance than to how unfortunately severed experimental film is from nearly all mainstream discussions of film because it’s generally hard to see outside of privileged contexts (fests, academia, the secret knowledge of a self-preserving circle working with a very finite set of resources and publicity access to the larger world); resources/capital/access/etc. So I won’t assign demerits for willful incuriosity, even if some recappers are reduced, in some unpleasantly condescending/bluffing cases, to dismissing this as a “student film” — because presumably experimentation is something the seasoned artist gets out of their system in maturity, following the George Lucas Model of graduating from Bruce Conner visuals to Lawrence Kasdan’s screenwriting.”
~ Vadim Rizov Goes For It, A Bit

“On the first ‘Twin Peaks,’ doing TV was like going from a mansion to a hut. But the arthouses are gone now, so cable television is a godsend — they’re the new art houses. You’ve got tons of freedom to do the work you want to do on TV, but there is a restriction in terms of picture and sound. The range of television is restricted. It’s hard for the power and the glory to come through. In other words, you can have things in a theater much louder and also much quieter. With TV, the quieter things have to be louder and the louder things have to be quieter, so you have less dynamics. The picture quality — it’s fine if you have a giant television with a good speaker system, but a lot of people will watch this on their laptops or whatever, so the picture and the sound are going to suffer big time. Optimally, people should be watching TV in a dark room with no disturbances and with as big and good a picture as possible and with as great sound as possible.”
~ David Lynch