MCN Curated Headlines

“‘Harvey’s in the sky with diamonds and he’s making me crazy. All he wants to do is party with his pretty baby.’ Weinstein later got Del Rey to do a song for the 2014 movie Big Eyes.”
Lana Del Rey Song “Cola” About Harvey Weinstein

“People didn’t like that I was deeply honest and an unavailable prude who, at times, had a big mouth”
Looking Back To Sean Young’s 2015 Exchange With Danny Leigh Over Where Her Career Landed

variety

“Harvey Weinstein, it is clear, is a monster, a sociopathic ogre, and I applaud the journalists who dragged the full scope of his reign of terror into the light of day, and survivors who have spoken out will have my heart forever. But Harvey is not the whole story. There are many Harveys, with varying amounts of influence, at every level in this industry. And at every level, formally and informally, they are covered for. Fuck that. I can’t name my attacker for legal reasons. But I won’t be silent any more. A television executive assaulted me, and the specific power dynamics of this industry aid and abet men like him.”
Variety TV Critic Maureen Ryan

hollywoodreporter.com

“Amazon was offered a chance to lock up ‘Big Little Lies.’ Other bidders made straight-to-series offers. Price would only offer a development deal, and company insiders say at a staff holiday party at the Lucky Strike in Hollywood, Price asked staffers if the two stars would ‘show their —s’ and mused aloud why he would greenlight the show if they didn’t. ‘Big Little’ Lies went to HBO and won eight Emmys — four times more than Amazon’s overall haul.”
Kim Masters and Lesley Goldberg on the Fall of Amazon Studios’ Roy Price

hollywoodreporter.com

“The greatest suffering was having to live without my parents. First, they took my mother from the ghetto, then my father.”
Polanski Shooting Documentary About His Wartime Krakow Childhood

ew

“I know it’s not my fault, but I didn’t -—ing help. Because I sat out there talking about this man like he was a hero, like he was my friend, like he was my father and shit like that, and he changed my —-ing life. And I showed other people, like, ‘You can dream, and you can make stuff, and this man will put it out.’ I was singing praises of somebody that I didn’t f—ing know. It all hurts, and it didn’t happen to me, but it all hurts.”
Kevin Smith To Donate Any Future Residuals From Weinstein-Produced Pics To Women in Film

“Everybody fucking knew… Or if Harvey’s behavior is the most reprehensible thing one can imagine, a not-so-distant second is the flood of sanctimonious denial and condemnation that now crashes upon these shores of rectitude in gloppy tides of bullshit righteousness.”
Screenwriter Scott Rosenberg On Harvey Weinstein

MCN Curated Headlines

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“The sad and painful truth is that pretty much everyone in this town knew who Harvey was. I have had long talks with my most liberal friends. Did we know he was a rapist? We didn’t. But did we know that for decades he has been offering actresses big careers in exchange for sexual favors? Yes, we did — and make no mistake, that is its own kind of rape. And did we all — or did any of us — refuse to do business with him on moral grounds? No. We ALL STAYED IN BUSINESS WITH HIM. I have never done business with Harvey but I can tell you with certainty that I would have — because I was recently approached by a film festival he sponsors. They asked me to submit my short film for their consideration and I did it without thinking twice. I am a dyed-in-the-wool feminist and a vocal one at that. So why didn’t I think twice? Because this entire town is built on the ugly principals that Harvey takes to an horrific extreme. If I didn’t work with people whose behavior I find reprehensible, I wouldn’t have a career.”
~ Showrunner Krista Vernoff

From AMPAS president John Bailey:

Dear Fellow Academy Members,

Danish director Carl Dreyer’s 1928 film “The Passion of Joan of Arc” is not only one of the visual landmarks of the silent era, but is a deeply disturbing portrait of a young woman’s persecution in the face of the male judges and priests of the ruling order. The actress Maria Falconetti gave one of the most profoundly affecting performances in the history of cinema as the Maid of Orleans.

Since the decision of the Academy’s Board of Governors on Saturday October 14 to expel producer Harvey Weinstein from its membership, I have been haunted not only by the recurring image of Falconetti and the sad arc of her career (dying in Argentina in 1946, reputedly from a crash diet) but of Joan’s refusal to submit to an auto de fe recantation of her beliefs.

Recent public testimonies by some of filmdom’s most recognized women regarding sexual intimidation, predation, and physical force is, clearly, a turning point in the film industry—and hopefully in our country, where what happens in the world of movies becomes a marker of societal Zeitgeist. Their decision to stand up against a powerful, abusive male not only parallels the cinema courage of Falconetti’s Joan but gives all women courage to speak up.

After Saturday’s Board of Governors meeting, the Academy issued a passionately worded statement, expressing not only our concern about harassment in the film industry, but our intention to be a strong voice in changing the culture of sexual exploitation in the movie business, already common well before the founding of the Academy 90 years ago. It is up to all of us Academy members to more clearly define for ourselves the parameters of proper conduct, of sexual equality, and respect for our fellow artists throughout our industry. The Academy cannot, and will not, be an inquisitorial court, but we can be part of a larger initiative to define standards of behavior, and to support the vulnerable women and men who may be at personal and career risk because of violations of ethical standards by their peers.

Yours,
John