The Weekend Report Archive for July, 2010

The Weekend Report: July 11, 2010

Despicable Me animated weekend movie-going and easily outpaced the competition with an estimated debut gross of $60.3 million. The frame’s other national freshman, the sci-fi Predators, also posted impressive initial returns of $25 million to rank third, with The Twilight Saga: Eclipse weathering the onslaught quite well with a 50% hit that translated into an…

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The Weekend Report: July 5, 2010

Weekend Estimates: July 2-5, 2010 Title Distributor Gross (average) % change * Theaters Cume Twilight: Eclipse Summit 84.3 (18,870) New 4468 177.1 The Last Airbender Par 53.4 (16,860) New 3169 69.8 Toy Story 3 BV 42.3 (10,510) -49% 4028 301.2 Grown Ups Sony 26.6 (7,520) -53% 3534 85.2 Knight and Day Fox 14.1 (4,540) -49%…

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“What Quibi trying to do is get to the next generation of film narrative. The first generation was movies, and they were principally two-hour stories that were designed to be watched in a single sitting in a movie theater [ED: After formats like the nickelodeon]. The next generation of film narrative was television, principally designed to be watched in one-hour chapters in front of a television set. I believe the third generation of film narrative will be a merging of those two ideas, which is to tell two-hour stories in chapters that are seven to ten minutes in length. We are actually doing long-form in bite-size.”
~ Jeffrey Katzenberg

“The important thing is: what makes the audience interested in it? Of course, I don’t take on any roles that don’t interest me, or where I can’t find anything for myself in it. But I don’t like talking about that. If you go into a restaurant and you have been served an exquisite meal, you don’t need to know how the chef felt, or when he chose the vegetables on the market. I always feel a little like I would pull the rug out from under myself if I were to I speak about the background of my work. My explanations would come into conflict with the reason a movie is made in the first place — for the experience of the audience — and that, I would not want.
~  Christoph Waltz