The Weekend Report Archive for May, 2010

True Grit: The Sands of Tommy

May 31, 2010 The pre-ordained juggernaut of Sex and the City 2 was naut. Smiling ogre the Memorial holiday weekend was Shrek Forever After with an estimated $55.6 million. The weekend’s incoming box office behemoths — Sex 2 and Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time — duked it out for the Miss Congeniality spot…

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Star Shrek: The Wrath of Con

May 23, 2010 Shrek Forever After held sway ogre the weekend with an estimated debut of $72.5 million. The session’s other wide opener MacGruber wound up a causality of ware with a humorless $4.1 million bow. The Bollywood hybrid Kites touched a toe in the water with 208 playdates and its $1 million box office…

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There Goes the Neighbor, Hood

May 16, 2010 Iron Man 2 took a 60% tumble but retained the top spot at the weekend box office with an estimated $51.9 million. A trio of new national releases followed in its wake, most noticeably the new millennium Robin Hood, which was pretty close to the bullseye with $37 million. A pair of…

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Iron and Steal

May 9, 2010 Iron Man 2 signaled the start of the summer season with a blockbuster-like debut gross estimated at $134.1 million. With the comic book sequel fusing more than 70% of the marketplace, holdovers generally experienced 50% plus erosions and other debuts were confined to the niches. The non-fiction Babies bowed at 534 theaters…

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Elm Oakay

May 2 , 2010 The resurrection of Mr. Krueger in A Nightmare on Elm Street scared up an estimated $32.1 million to claim weekend bragging rights in an otherwise soft movie viewing session. The frame’s other national debut, the unintentionally horrifying Furry Vengeance, ranked fifth in the lineup with $6.5 million. Niche freshmen including Bollywood…

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“I had this friend who was my roommate for a while. She seemed really normal in every way except that she wouldn’t buy shampoo. She would only use my shampoo. And after a year it’s like, “When are you going to buy your own shampoo?” It was her way of digging in her heels. It was a certain sense of entitlement, or a certain anger. It was so interesting to me why she wouldn’t buy her own fucking shampoo. It was like,“I’m gonna use yours.” It was coming from a place of “You have more money than me, I just know it”—whether I did or I didn’t. Or maybe she felt, “You have a better life than me,” or “You have a better room than me in the apartment.” It was hostile. And she was a really close friend! There was never any other shampoo and I knew she was washing her hair. And clearly I have a thing about shampoo, as we see in ‘Friends with Money.’ I had some nice shampoo. So I found that psychologically so interesting how a person can function normally in every way and yet have this aberrance—it’s like a skip in the record. It was a sense of entitlement, I think. I put that in Olivia’s character, too, with her stealing someone’s face cream.”
Nicole Holofcener

“When books become a thing, they can no longer be fine.

“Literary people get mad at Knausgård the same way they get mad at Jonathan Franzen, a writer who, if I’m being honest, might be fine. I’m rarely honest about Jonathan Franzen. He’s an extremely annoying manI have only read bits and pieces of his novels, and while I’ve stopped reading many novels even though they were pretty good or great, I have always stopped reading Jonathan Franzen’s novels because I thought they were aggressively boring and dumb and smug. But why do I think this? I didn’t read him when he was a new interesting writer who wrote a couple of weird books and then hit it big with ‘The Corrections,’ a moment in which I might have picked him up with curiosity and read with an open mind; I only noticed him once, after David Foster Wallace had died, he became the heir apparent for the Great American Novelist position, once he had had that thing with Oprah and started giving interviews in which he said all manner of dumb shit; I only noticed him well after I had been told he was An Important Writer.

“So I can’t and shouldn’t pretend that I am unmoved by the lazily-satisfied gentle arrogance he projects or when he is given license to project it by the has-the-whole-world-gone-crazy development of him being constantly crowned and re-crowned as Is He The Great American Writer. What I really object to is this, and if there’s anything to his writing beyond it, I can’t see it and can’t be bothered. Others read him and tell me he’s actually a good writer—people whose critical instincts I have learned to respect—so I feel sure that he’s probably a perfectly fine, that his books are fine, and that probably even his stupid goddamned bird essays are probably also fine.

“But it’s too late. He has become a thing; he can’t be fine.”
~ Aaron Bady