The Weekend Report Archive for April, 2010

The B Team …

April 25, 2010 The entry of some short timers did little to energize the movie going bug and through the rubble How to Train Your Dragon emerged as the weekend favorite with an estimated $15.1 million. Top among newcomers was J-Lo’s rom-com The Back-Up Plan that slotted second with $11.7 million. The other national debs…

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Butt, Butt, Butt …

April 18 , 2010 The seemingly unending potency of 3D fare continued with How to Train Your Dragon a winner by a snout with a weekend estimate of $19.9 million. The debut of Kick-Ass — the session’s presumed winner based on early tracking — had to settle for a second place position with $19.2 million…

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Night at the Bistro

April 11 , 2010 The Titans didn’t clash but there was considerable jostling at the top of the box office charts with fierce competition for win, place and show positions. Freshmen entry Date Night scored the lead in its opening day with $9.1 million but lost ground as the session proceeded. The final frame scoreboard…

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A Touch of Clash

April 4 , 2010 Ye Gods! Clash of the Titans felled the competition to take weekend bragging rights with an estimated $61.1 million. The record setting session also saw excellent results of $30.1 million for Why Did I Get Married Too?; a strong hold that generated $29.3 million for How to Train Your Dragon; and…

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“Well, actually, of that whole group that I call the post-60s anti-authority auteurs, a lot of them came from television. Peckinpah’s the only one whose television work represents his feature work. I mean, like the only one. Mark Rydell can direct a really good episode of ‘Gunsmoke’ and Michael Ritchie can direct a really good episode of ‘The Big Valley,’ but they don’t necessarily look like The Candidate. But Peckinpah’s stuff, even the scripts he wrote that he didn’t even direct, have a Peckinpah feel – the way I think there’s a Corbucci West – suggest a Peckinpah West. That even in his random episodes that he wrote for ‘Gunsmoke’ – it’s right there.”
~ Quentin Tarantino

“The thought is interrupted by an odd interlude. We are speaking in the side room of Casita, a swish and fairly busy Italian bistro in Aoyama – a district of Tokyo usually so replete with celebrities that they spark minimal fuss. Kojima’s fame, however, exceeds normal limits and adoring staff have worked out who their guest is. He stops mid-sentence and points up towards the speakers, delighted. The soft jazz that had been playing discreetly across the restaurant’s dark, hardwood interior has suddenly been replaced with the theme music from some of Kojima’s hit games. Harry Gregson-Williams’ music is sublime in its context but ‘Metal Gear Solid 4: Guns of the Patriots’ is not, Kojima acknowledges, terribly restauranty. He pauses, adjusting a pair of large, blue-framed glasses of his own design, and returns to the way in which games have not only influenced films, but have also changed the way in which people watch them. “There are stories being told [in cinema] that my generation may find surprising but which the gamer generation doesn’t find weird at all,” he says.
~ Hideo Kojima