The Weekend Report Archive for February, 2010

Still Crazies (After All These Years)

February 28, 2010 The tremor continued in the marketplace as Shutter Island prevailed over two incoming missiles with an estimated $22.3 million weekend. Still the freshmen entries were close behind with buddy flics in Cop Out entering (but not breaking) the scene with $18.4 million and the redo of the 1972 apocalyptic thriller The Crazies…

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Shutter … the Thought

February 22, 2010 Paranoia reached new heights of popularity as Shutter Island topped weekend charts with an estimated $40.3 million. It was the sole new national release but reflecting the twisty thriller’s appeal was the exclusive bow of The Ghost Writer that rang up an impressive $43,200 from four reveals. Other niche and limited debuts…

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I Heart Presidents

February 15, 2010 It was candy and roses for Valentine’s Day as it ascended to the top of long weekend viewing with an estimated four-day box office of $66.2 million. In a bountiful frame two other freshmen entries followed. The youth targeted Percy Jackson and the Olympians bowed to $38.9 million and the revived The…

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The Weekend Report: February 14, 2010

February 14, 2010 Weekend Estimates Domestic Market Share Weekend Estimates: February 12-14, 2010 Title Distributor Gross (average) % change * Theaters Cume Valentine’s Day WB 51.8 (14,140) New 3665 51.8 Percy Jackson & the Olympians Fox 31.4 (9,370) New 3356 31.4 The Wolfman Uni 30.5 (9,460) New 3222 34.7 Avatar Fox 22.2 (8,260) -3% 2685…

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Love Letters

February 7, 2010 Romance trumped visceral thrills as the three-hanky Dear John debuted at the top of weekend viewing charts with an estimated $32.7 million. The session’s other new national premiere From Paris with Love settled into position three with $8.1 million. Regional openers saw a solid bow of $232,000 for Les Sept jours du…

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“We’ve talked about this before in the past, my obsession with the Shakespearean histories having the ideal combination of the sweet and the sour. In ‘Henry IV, Part II’ which we’ve discussed before, in the end of that story it’s very complex and haunting because Prince Hal becomes Henry the King, and he has transcended his hoodlum days and at the ceremony is Falstaff, his good friend with whom he has really fucked around and been a loser with, and Falstaff comes up to him and says, ‘Now that you’re king we can really party,’ and the king famously says, ‘I know thee not, old man.’ It becomes Henry IV’s anointment and Falstaff’s catastrophe. That’s life. I have experienced very little unfettered triumph. There are moments, such as when my children are born, but even that comes with new fears and anxieties. In a sense the better you can communicate that life is both at once, the more powerful over time something becomes. One strives for something where the threads are there because it lasts in way that is very palpable. The idea of a tragedy is powerful in literature and theater, but in cinema it doesn’t work, certainly not commercially, and less so critically. Why is that? I think it has to do with how movies are so close to us.”
~ James Gray

 

“Hollywood executives can rattle off the rules for getting a movie approved by Chinese censors: no sex (too unseemly); no ghosts (too spiritual). Among 10 prohibited plot elements are “disrupts the social order” and “jeopardizes social morality.” Time travel is frowned upon because of its premise that individuals can change history. U.S. filmmakers sometimes anticipate Chinese censors and alter movies before their release. The Oscar-winning alien-invasion drama “Arrival” was edited to make a Chinese general appear less antagonistic before the film’s debut in China this year. For “Passengers,” the space adventure starring Chris Pratt and Jennifer Lawrence, a scene showing Mr. Pratt’s bare backside was removed, and a scene of Mr. Pratt chatting in Mandarin with a robot bartender was added.”
~ “Hollywood’s New Script”