The Weekend Report Archive for January, 2010

HE-dge of Darkness

January 31, 2010 Avatar continued to steam along with a sixth weekend estimated gross of $30.1 million. Its incoming competition (combined) grossed roughly the same amount. The Mel Gibson thriller (his first screen role in seven years) Edge of Darkness struggled to $17 million while the programmer romantic comedy When in Rome did a passable…

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You Can’t Take the Na’vi

In its sixth weekend in release Avatar slipped a modest 15% and left the competition in the distance with an estimated $36.2 million. Three films bowed nationally during the frame with the sci-fi adventure Legion the best grosser with $17.9 million that ranked it second. The other wide debuts included the family fantasy The Tooth…

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King of the Box Office

Avatar continued to fend off all contenders as b.o. champ with an estimated $54.1 million over the four-day Martin Luther King holiday stanza. Its closest rival was the incoming science-fiction allegory Book of Eli that racked up an impressive $38.3 million. The session’s other national debut was the Jackie Chan action comedy The Spy Next…

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On a Tar

Avatar continued to dominate domestic sales with a fourth weekend estimated gross of $46.5 million that most films would envy as an opening stat. The film’s $427 million now ranks it second only to Titanic as all-time domestic box office grosser. With the holidays consummated a new spate of films debuted with the chiller Daybreakers…

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Boffo!

The opening shot of 2010 began with the biggest first weekend of any year ever with box office expansion of 46% from last year alone. And with audiences in a spirited holiday mood the last few weeks of 2009 provided a tremendous closing surge. Initial estimates peg domestic revenues at just shy of $10.7 billion…

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Quote Unquotesee all »

The Atlantic: You saw that the Academy Awards recently held up your 2001 acceptance speech as the Platonic ideal of an Oscar speech. Did you have a reaction?

Soderbergh: Shock and dismay. When that popped up and people started texting me about it, I said, “Oh, it’s too bad I’m not there to tell the story of how that took place.” Well. I was not sober at the time. And I had nothing prepared because I knew I wasn’t going to win [Best Director for Traffic]. I figured Ridley, Ang or Daldry would win. So I was hitting the bar pretty hard, having a great night, feeling super-relaxed because I don’t have to get up there. So the combination of a 0.4 blood alcohol level and lack of preparation resulted in me, in my state of drunkenness crossed with adrenaline surge. I was coherent enough to know that [if I tried to thank everyone], that way lies destruction. So I went the other way. There were some people who appreciated that, and there were some people who really wanted to hear their names said, and I had to apologize to them.
~ Steven Soderbergh

 

“I have made few films in a way. I never made action films. I never made science fiction films. I never made, really, very complicated settings, because I had modest ambitions. I knew they would never trust me to have the budget to do something different, so my mind is more focused on things I know. So they were always mental adventures I wanted to approach and share. Working for cinema with no – not only no money, but also no ambition for money. I was happy and proud [to receive the honorary Oscar] because of that, that [the Academy] could understand what kind of work I have done over 60 years. I stayed faithful to the ideal of sharing emotion, impressions, and mostly because I have so much empathy for other people that I approach people who are not really spoken about. I have 65 years of work in my bag, and when I put the bag down, what comes out? It’s really the desire of finding links and relationships with different kinds of people. I never made a film about the bourgeoisie, about rich people. about nobility. My choices have been to show people that are, in a way, more common and see that each of them has something special and interesting, rare and beautiful. It’s my natural way of looking at people. I didn’t fight my instincts. And maybe that has been appreciated in the famous circle of Hollywood.“

Agnes Varda