The Weekend Report Archive for December, 2009

The Game’s Afoot

T.S. Elliott be damned, the movie going world is finishing the year not with a whimper but a bang. The fortuitous Friday positioning of Christmas proved to be a nice asset with the weekend generating close to $275 million in ticket sales that establishes a new three-day weekend record. Avatar once again took bragging rights…

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Eyktan Kifkeyä (King of the World Na’vi-Style)

Inclement weather aside in the American Northeast, Avatarsoared to an estimated $72.5 million domestically and added an additional $232 million from international markets in its debut round. The frame’s other national newcomer was the comedy Did You Hear About the Morgans? that ranked fourth with an uninspired $6.7 million. The session was also rife with…

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Old Croaks at Home

Following two weeks of exclusive engagements The Princess and the Frog migrated to the big pond and led weekend ticket sales with an estimated $24.8 million. The session’s sole national newcomer was the upscale Invictus that ranked third overall with an OK $9 million. In limited wide release Larger Than Life 3D failed to live…

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The Weekend Report: December 6, 2009

Weekend Estimates: December 4-6, 2009 Title Distributor Gross (avg) % change Theaters Cume The Blind Side WB 20.3 (6,110) -49% 3326 129.2 Twilight: New Moon Summit 15.5 (3,760) -64% 4124 254.4 Brothers Lionsgate 9.7 (4,660) New 2088 9.7 A Christmas Carol BV 7.6 (2,970) -52% 2546 115.1 2012 Sony 6.8 (2,110) -61% 3220 149 Old…

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The Atlantic: You saw that the Academy Awards recently held up your 2001 acceptance speech as the Platonic ideal of an Oscar speech. Did you have a reaction?

Soderbergh: Shock and dismay. When that popped up and people started texting me about it, I said, “Oh, it’s too bad I’m not there to tell the story of how that took place.” Well. I was not sober at the time. And I had nothing prepared because I knew I wasn’t going to win [Best Director for Traffic]. I figured Ridley, Ang or Daldry would win. So I was hitting the bar pretty hard, having a great night, feeling super-relaxed because I don’t have to get up there. So the combination of a 0.4 blood alcohol level and lack of preparation resulted in me, in my state of drunkenness crossed with adrenaline surge. I was coherent enough to know that [if I tried to thank everyone], that way lies destruction. So I went the other way. There were some people who appreciated that, and there were some people who really wanted to hear their names said, and I had to apologize to them.
~ Steven Soderbergh

 

“I have made few films in a way. I never made action films. I never made science fiction films. I never made, really, very complicated settings, because I had modest ambitions. I knew they would never trust me to have the budget to do something different, so my mind is more focused on things I know. So they were always mental adventures I wanted to approach and share. Working for cinema with no – not only no money, but also no ambition for money. I was happy and proud [to receive the honorary Oscar] because of that, that [the Academy] could understand what kind of work I have done over 60 years. I stayed faithful to the ideal of sharing emotion, impressions, and mostly because I have so much empathy for other people that I approach people who are not really spoken about. I have 65 years of work in my bag, and when I put the bag down, what comes out? It’s really the desire of finding links and relationships with different kinds of people. I never made a film about the bourgeoisie, about rich people. about nobility. My choices have been to show people that are, in a way, more common and see that each of them has something special and interesting, rare and beautiful. It’s my natural way of looking at people. I didn’t fight my instincts. And maybe that has been appreciated in the famous circle of Hollywood.“

Agnes Varda