The Weekend Report Archive for October, 2008

Slice and Nice

Weekend box office ballooned as two iconic vehicles found avid fan bases lining up in force. High School Musical 3 led the frame with an estimated $42.3 million and the runner-up slot fell to Saw Vwith a not too shabby $30.6 million. The third national launch was the cop meller Pride and Glory, which opened…

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Feel the Payne … George

While the press beat the Bushes, audiences marched to the multiplex to see the neo-noir Max Payne and the Mark Wahlberg vehicle led the frame with an estimated $18.1 million. W. — Oliver Stone’s rumination on the sitting U.S. president — ranked third overall with $10.5 million; just a heartbeat away from another new release,…

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Body Bags

Beverly Hills Chihuahua continued to bark up the right tree as it claimed the top weekend viewing choice with an estimated $17.4 million. However unless you were a high concept horror movie, the news was grim to disappointing for new movies. The bright light was Quarantine, which ranked second with $14.1 million. The anticipated weekend…

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Oy Chihuahua!

Nick and Norah’s Infinite Playlist displayed some promise with an $11.9 million debut that ranked third overall and Bill Maher’s holy screed Religulous was resolute with $3.5 million in limited wide release. However, there weren’t sufficient laughs in the $3.6 million gross of the political satire An American Carol, which marked the first wide opener…

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“Because of my relative candor on Twitter regarding why I quit my day job, my DMs have overflowed with similar stories from colleagues around the globe. These peeks behind the curtains of film festivals, venues, distributors and funding bodies weren’t pretty. Certain dismal patterns recurred (and resonated): Boards who don’t engage with or even understand their organization’s artistic mission and are insensitive to the diverse neighborhood in which their organization’s venue is located; incompetent founders and/or presidents who create only obstacles, never solutions; unduly empowered, Trumpian bean counters who chip away at the taste and experiences that make organizations’ cultural offerings special; expensive PR teams that don’t bring to the table a bare-minimum familiarity with the rich subcultural art form they’re half-heartedly peddling as “product”; nonprofit arts organizations for whom art now ranks as a distant-second goal behind profit.”
~ Eric Allen Hatch

To me, Hunter S. Thompson was a hero. His early books were great, but in many ways, his life and career post–Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail is a cautionary tale for authors. People expected him to be high and drunk all the time and play that persona, and he stuck with that to the end, and I don’t think it was good for him. I always sort of feel mixed emotions when I hear that people went and hung out with Hunter and how great it was to get high with Hunter. The fact is the guy was having difficulty doing any sustained writing at all for years probably because so many quote, unquote, “friends” wanted to get high with him … There was a badly disappointed romantic there. I mean, that great line, “This is where the wave broke, the tide rolled back … ” This was a guy that was hurt and disappointed and very bitter about things, and it made his writing beautiful, and also with that came a lot of pain.
~ Anthony Bourdain