The Weekend Report Archive for November, 2007

Some Enchanted Turkey …

November 25, 2007 Weekend Estimates Domestic Market Share The Thanksgiving holiday frame was definitely rich on stuffing with the time travel princess ofEnchanted emerging most magical with an estimated $34.8 million during the weekend and $49.5 million from its Wednesday launch. The table was overflowing with new entrees and scant on sides. The Afrocentric This…

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Wulf at the Door

November 18, 2007 Weekend Estimates Domestic Market Share The venerable Nordic saga Beowulf handily led the frame with a debut estimated at $27.5 million. However, other premieres proved less fulsome including just fair results of $9.9 million for the family friendly Mr. Magorium’s Wonder Emporium and a dull $1.9 million for the long gestating adaptation of Love in…

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Sting Like a Lion, Float Like a Santa

November 11, 2007 Weekend Estimates Domestic Market Share Last weekend’s leaders switched positions with the animated yellow jacket Bee Movie edging out the crime saga American Gangster with respective estimates of $25.7 million and $24.5 million. That left weekend freshmen scrambling for patrons with holiday family entry Fred Claus corralling a solid $18.5 million while political thriller Lions for…

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Honey in the Bank …

November 4 , 2007 Weekend Estimates Domestic Market Share The multiplexes were abuzz with American Gangster leading the frame on an estimated $46.5 million tally and the animated Bee Movie adding a stinging $38.9 million to a turnaround session at the box office. The leaders didn’t leave much more for the national debut of Martian Child that ranked…

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Quote Unquotesee all »

DEADLINE: How does a visualist feel about people watching your films on a phone or VOD?
REFN: It depends on what kind of movie you make. We had great success with Only God Forgives on multiple platforms in the U.S. Young people will decide how they see it, when they want to see it. Don’t try to fight it. Embrace it. That’s a wonderful opportunity. We’re at the most exciting time since the invention of the wheel, in terms of creativity because distribution and accessibility have changed everything. A camera is still a camera whether it’s digital or not; there’s still sound; an actor is an actor. Ninety-nine percent of what you do is going to be seen on a smart phone – I know this is the greatest thing ever made because it allows people to choose, watching what you do on this format or go into a theater and see it on a screen. That means more people than ever will see what I do, which is personally satisfying in terms of vanity. But you have to be able to adapt, to accept things in different order and length than we’re used to. We are in a very, very exciting time.
~ Nic Refn to Jen Yamato

DEADLINE: You mention Tarantino, who with Christopher Nolan and a few other giants, saved film stock from extinction. To him, showing a digital film in a theater is the equivalent of watching TV in public. Make an argument for why digital is a good film making canvas.
REFN: Costwise, it’s a very effective way for young people to start making movies. You can make your movie on an iPhone. It’s wonderful seeing how my own children use technology to enhance creativity. For me it’s a wonderful canvas. Sure, I love grain in film. I love celluloid. But I also like creativity. I like crayons, I like pencils, I like paint. It’s all relative. Technology is more inclusive. A hundred years ago when film was invented, it was an elitist club. Very few people got to make it, very few people controlled it and very few people owned it. A hundred years later, storytelling through images is everyone’s domain. It’s ultimate capitalism. There are no rules, and no barriers and no Hays Code. Where does this go in another hundred years? I don’t know but I would love to see it.
~ Nic Refn To Jen Yamato