The Weekend Report Archive for September, 2007

Tu Tu Much …

September 30, 2007 Weekend Estimates Domestic Market Share The ground war multiplex to multiplex encounter between the family friendly The Game Plan and the Rambo-unctious The Kingdom led to a one-two finish respectively estimated at $22.9 million and $17.8 million. The solid, relatively predictable box office failed to spike business as hold over titles generally experienced…

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Good is Better ‘n Evil …

September 23, 2007 Weekend Estimates Summer Market Share Mammy Yokum used to say that “Good is better ‘n evil cause it’s nicer.” Obviously the comic book matriarch isn’t abreast with the new Hollywood that decreed Resident Evil: Extinction the weekend box office champ with an estimated $23.9 million debut to runner up Good Luck Chuck at $13.6 million….

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Death Wish XXX …

September16, 2007 Weekend Estimates Summer Market Share The distaff vigilante yarn The Brave One led all comers with a debut weekend estimated at $13.8 million. There was no lack of competition with two other films making their national bows and more than a minion opening in limited release. The comedy Mr. Woodcock ranked third overall with $8.6…

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Gunfight Corrals OK …

September 9, 2007 Weekend Estimates Summer Market Share It was high noon at the box office as 3:10 to Yuma got to the station ahead of the posse with an estimated $13.5 million. As the summer rode into the sunset, the sound of the fall came in a blazin’ … sort of. The debut of Yuma…

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Trick or Treat?

September 3, 2007 Weekend Finals Summer Market Share The calendar challenged folks at MGM sprang forward with Halloween as the Labor Day weekend’s top viewing choice with an estimated $33.4 million. It was also balls out for the ping pong madness of Balls of Fury that ranked third with $13.8 million and a strong screen average for…

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“I have a license to carry in New York. Can you believe that? Nobody knows that, [Applause] somebody attacks, somebody attacks me, oh, they’re gonna be shot. Can you imagine? Somebody says, oh, it is Trump, he’s easy pickings what do you say? Right? Oh, boy. What was the famous movie? No. Remember, no remember where he went around and he sort of after his wife was hurt so badly and kill. What?  I — Honestly, Yeah, right, it’s true, but you have many of them. Famous movie. Somebody. You have many of them. Charles Bronson right the late great Charles Bronson name of the movie come on.  , remember that? Ah, we’re gonna cut you up, sir, we’re gonna cut you up, uh-huh.

Bing!

One of the great movies. Charles Bronson, great, Charles Bronson. Great movies. Today you can’t make that movie because it’s not politically correct, right? It’s not politically correct. But could you imagine with Trump? Somebody says, oh, all these big monsters aren’t around he’s easy pickings and then shoot.”
~ Donald Trump

“The scene opens the new movie. It was something Ridley Scott told me a long time ago, when I was on my eighth draft of Blade Runner. He thinks it’s my fault, which it probably is, but it’s also his fault, because he kept coming up with new ideas. This time, he said to me, “What did Deckard do before he was doing this?” I said, “He was doing what he was doing, but not on such a high level. He was retiring androids that weren’t quite like Nexus Sixes, like Nexus Fives, kind of dumb androids.” He said, “So, why don’t we start the movie like that?” He always had a new beginning he wanted to try. Let’s start it on a train, let’s start it on a plane. Let’s start in the snow. Let’s start in the desert. I was writing all that. He said, “What if Deckard is retiring an old version of Nexus?” Right away I was feeling him, like fate, and he said, “There’s a cabin, with soup bubbling on the stove …” When he said soup boiling on the stove, I said, “Don’t say any more! Let me get home.” I wrote a scene that night. Just three or four pages. Deckard retires this not-very-bright droid, and you feel sorry for him. It’s like Steinbeck, Of Mice and Men. It’s just those two guys, with Deckard as the George character and the droid as the Lennie, and Deckard doesn’t want to do it. But then the droid gets mad, and then Deckard has to do it. The audience thinks he killed someone—he reaches into the guy’s mouth and pulls off his whole jaw and we see it says made by tyrell industries or whatever. I wrote that scene and took it to Ridley. I was proud of it. I remember standing and watching him read the whole thing. He loved it, but no. There are a lot of scenes that didn’t get in, but I never forgot that one. I wrote it as the beginning to this new short story called “The Shape of the Final Dog.” I’d always wanted to have a dog that wasn’t real, so I wrote one into the scene at the cabin. After Deckard retires the droid, he’s getting ready to take off and he wants the dog to come with him. The dog rolls over and keeps barking with his mouth closed. The dog’s an android dog. I thought, If there’s ever a new Blade Runner, we’ll have to use this scene. Three weeks go by, and I’m working on the story and it’s ready to hand in. The phone rings. Someone with a posh English accent says, “Would you be available in ten minutes for a call with Ridley Scott?” These people are so important they don’t waste their time on voicemail. I said, “I’ll be here.” Ten minutes go by and Ridley calls. “Hampton! Did you know, I think we’ve got it together to do Blade Runner a second time?” I said, “You finally got so hard up you’re calling me.” I knew they’d been looking for a year. People had been telling me, “You’ve got to call Ridley,” but I was a little chagrined or embarrassed. I thought, He’ll call me if he wants. Ridley said, “We’re interested in whether you have any ideas.” I said, “Funny you should ask that question. Let me read you a paragraph.” I walk over there with the phone and I read him the opening paragraph. And he says, “Fuck me. Can you come to London tomorrow?”
~ Hampton Fancher