The Weekend Report Archive for August, 2007

Bean Counters

August 26, 2007 Weekend Finals Domestic Market Share Superbad continued as the top draw in North American multiplexes with an estimated $17.9 million that represented a 46% drop in its second weekend in release. In these dog days of summer there was only limited solace for a torrent of new product hoping to get a…

Read the full article »

You’ve Got That McLovin’ Feeling

August 19, 2007 Weekend Finals Domestic Market Share You can’t get me to say that Superbad was super good but the film that one critic extolled as “the Lawrence of Arabiaof teen pics” out-grossed the field with an estimated $31.4 million in another upbeat movie going session. The super total largely compensated for poor openings for The…

Read the full article »

Feel the Rush …

August 12, 2007 Weekend Finals Domestic Market Share Three was a charm for Rush Hour as it debuted at the top of the charts with an estimated $50.8 million. The heat from the Chan-Tucker action comedy got minimal assistance from a trio of other national debuts. The fantasy adventureStardust failed to sparkle with a fourth place…

Read the full article »

Bourne Again …

August 4 , 2007 Weekend Estimates Canada: Weekend Estimates Domestic Market Share The third installment of the Jason Bourne saga – The Bourne Ultimatum – reigned supreme at the box office with an estimated debuted of $70.3 million. In another expansive frame three other releases had average to poor bows including canine crusader Underdog that ranked third…

Read the full article »

The Weekend Report

movieman on: The Weekend Report

Eric N on: Weekend Report

Judi Levine on: The Weekend Report

Steph on: The Weekend Report

laura rue on: The Weekend Report

Sam on: The Weekend Report

Peter on: The Weekend Report

Isah Adomoc on: The Weekend Report

K. Bowen on: The Weekend Report

charlesmayaki on: The Weekend Report

Quote Unquotesee all »

“What Quibi trying to do is get to the next generation of film narrative. The first generation was movies, and they were principally two-hour stories that were designed to be watched in a single sitting in a movie theater [ED: After formats like the nickelodeon]. The next generation of film narrative was television, principally designed to be watched in one-hour chapters in front of a television set. I believe the third generation of film narrative will be a merging of those two ideas, which is to tell two-hour stories in chapters that are seven to ten minutes in length. We are actually doing long-form in bite-size.”
~ Jeffrey Katzenberg

“The important thing is: what makes the audience interested in it? Of course, I don’t take on any roles that don’t interest me, or where I can’t find anything for myself in it. But I don’t like talking about that. If you go into a restaurant and you have been served an exquisite meal, you don’t need to know how the chef felt, or when he chose the vegetables on the market. I always feel a little like I would pull the rug out from under myself if I were to I speak about the background of my work. My explanations would come into conflict with the reason a movie is made in the first place — for the experience of the audience — and that, I would not want.
~  Christoph Waltz