The Weekend Report Archive for June, 2007

Sequels Aren’t Equals …

June 24, 2007 Weekend Estimates Domestic Market Share The Evan Almighty wave crested at an estimated $32.3 million to lead all titles in the domestic marketplace. The session also featured the national bow of the Stephen King chiller 1408 in second place with a sturdy $20.4 million and a disappointing $3.9 million bow for the highly lauded saga…

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June 17, 2007

June 17, 2007 Weekend Estimates Domestic Market Share Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer glided to an estimated $57.7 million to take command of weekend movie going. In a slightly depressed marketplace the box office gods dismissed a revivedNancy Drew that ranked seventh overall with a meager $7.2 million. Similarly specialty newcomers were largely…

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Thirteen … The Hard Way

June 10, 2007 Weekend Estimates Domestic Market Share Ocean’s Thirteen walked away from the table with an estimated $36.2 million to take top spot in the weekend movie derby. Commercially it out stayed its welcome and audiences didn’t appear to be waddling with happy feet to Surf’s Up’s celluloid penguins that grossed $17.9 million to…

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Shiver Me Trimester ..

June 3 , 2007 Weekend Estimates Domestic Market Share The scurvy crew of Pirates of the Caribbean: At World’s End once again plundered heartiest with an estimated weekend booty of $43.7 million. However, its fiercest competition came not from a tent pole but the bawdy high concept comedy Knocked Up that grossed $29.3 million. The frame…

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The Atlantic: You saw that the Academy Awards recently held up your 2001 acceptance speech as the Platonic ideal of an Oscar speech. Did you have a reaction?

Soderbergh: Shock and dismay. When that popped up and people started texting me about it, I said, “Oh, it’s too bad I’m not there to tell the story of how that took place.” Well. I was not sober at the time. And I had nothing prepared because I knew I wasn’t going to win [Best Director for Traffic]. I figured Ridley, Ang or Daldry would win. So I was hitting the bar pretty hard, having a great night, feeling super-relaxed because I don’t have to get up there. So the combination of a 0.4 blood alcohol level and lack of preparation resulted in me, in my state of drunkenness crossed with adrenaline surge. I was coherent enough to know that [if I tried to thank everyone], that way lies destruction. So I went the other way. There were some people who appreciated that, and there were some people who really wanted to hear their names said, and I had to apologize to them.
~ Steven Soderbergh

 

“I have made few films in a way. I never made action films. I never made science fiction films. I never made, really, very complicated settings, because I had modest ambitions. I knew they would never trust me to have the budget to do something different, so my mind is more focused on things I know. So they were always mental adventures I wanted to approach and share. Working for cinema with no – not only no money, but also no ambition for money. I was happy and proud [to receive the honorary Oscar] because of that, that [the Academy] could understand what kind of work I have done over 60 years. I stayed faithful to the ideal of sharing emotion, impressions, and mostly because I have so much empathy for other people that I approach people who are not really spoken about. I have 65 years of work in my bag, and when I put the bag down, what comes out? It’s really the desire of finding links and relationships with different kinds of people. I never made a film about the bourgeoisie, about rich people. about nobility. My choices have been to show people that are, in a way, more common and see that each of them has something special and interesting, rare and beautiful. It’s my natural way of looking at people. I didn’t fight my instincts. And maybe that has been appreciated in the famous circle of Hollywood.“

Agnes Varda