The Weekend Report Archive for January, 2007

Epic .. In Name Only

January 28, 2007 Weekend Estimates Domestic Market Share Epic Movie spoofed its way to the top of weekend movie going charts with an estimated $18.9 million in yet another pokey frame at cinemas. The session saw additional debuts of $14.2 for the gangster yarn Smokin’ Aces in second spot and the romantic-comedy Catch and Release ranked fourth…

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Guided Tour …

January 21, 2007 Weekend Estimates Domestic Market Share Night at the Museum and Stomp the Yard fought it out for weekend bragging rights with the films finishing the frame with respective estimated grosses of $12.9 million and $12.7 million. In another fiercely competitive frame The Hitcher had a relatively clear field as the sole new national release…

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Stomp, Rattle & Roll…

January 15, 2007 Weekend Estimates Domestic Market Share Stomp the Yard led the Martin Luther King holiday frame with an estimated $26.2 million in a crowded marketplace that proved fiercely competitive. With a number of strong holdover titles most freshmen entries wound up underperforming, particularly the horror outing Primeval that grossed $6.9 million and family entry…

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Ring In The New …

January 7, 2007 Weekend Estimates Domestic Market Share Night at the Museum exacted a cinematic hat trick, remaining the weekend top grosser with an estimated $24.1 million. The New Year arrived with a trio of freshmen releases that scored good to fair openings while holdover titles generally withstood the transition well. Overall it added up…

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January 1, 2007

Weekend Estimates Top Domestic Releases Domestic Market Share Night at the Museum remained the top draw for the New Year’s weekend with an estimated four-day gross of $46.6 million. The year ended with a surge, abetted by the holiday’s Sunday placement. It marked about a 7% hike from revenues on the last weekend of 2005…

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The Atlantic: You saw that the Academy Awards recently held up your 2001 acceptance speech as the Platonic ideal of an Oscar speech. Did you have a reaction?

Soderbergh: Shock and dismay. When that popped up and people started texting me about it, I said, “Oh, it’s too bad I’m not there to tell the story of how that took place.” Well. I was not sober at the time. And I had nothing prepared because I knew I wasn’t going to win [Best Director for Traffic]. I figured Ridley, Ang or Daldry would win. So I was hitting the bar pretty hard, having a great night, feeling super-relaxed because I don’t have to get up there. So the combination of a 0.4 blood alcohol level and lack of preparation resulted in me, in my state of drunkenness crossed with adrenaline surge. I was coherent enough to know that [if I tried to thank everyone], that way lies destruction. So I went the other way. There were some people who appreciated that, and there were some people who really wanted to hear their names said, and I had to apologize to them.
~ Steven Soderbergh

 

“I have made few films in a way. I never made action films. I never made science fiction films. I never made, really, very complicated settings, because I had modest ambitions. I knew they would never trust me to have the budget to do something different, so my mind is more focused on things I know. So they were always mental adventures I wanted to approach and share. Working for cinema with no – not only no money, but also no ambition for money. I was happy and proud [to receive the honorary Oscar] because of that, that [the Academy] could understand what kind of work I have done over 60 years. I stayed faithful to the ideal of sharing emotion, impressions, and mostly because I have so much empathy for other people that I approach people who are not really spoken about. I have 65 years of work in my bag, and when I put the bag down, what comes out? It’s really the desire of finding links and relationships with different kinds of people. I never made a film about the bourgeoisie, about rich people. about nobility. My choices have been to show people that are, in a way, more common and see that each of them has something special and interesting, rare and beautiful. It’s my natural way of looking at people. I didn’t fight my instincts. And maybe that has been appreciated in the famous circle of Hollywood.“

Agnes Varda