The Weekend Report Archive for November, 2006

Turkey Trot

The Thanksgiving frame was putting on a happy face as Happy Feet once again pushed ahead of Casino Royale by a beak with the film’s grossing $38.1 million and $30.1 million respectively during the three-day portion of the holiday. The table was heavy with new sides but patrons were only enthusiastic for third-ranked Déjà Vu…

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Shaken and Brrrrrrd!

They’re called estimates … but more on that later. The battle between a spy called Bond and a penguin named Mumble (aka The Battle of the Tuxedos) in, respectively, Casino Royale and Happy Feet concluded in a statistical dead heat with each film grossing an estimated $41.1 million. It was heady news for each title…

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Khazakh on Fire!

Something Borat but definitely not blue was elevated to an estimated $28.6 million to lead weekend movie options. Freshman entries however were on the soft side with the off center comedy Stranger Than Fiction proving best in show with a $14.2 million debut that ranked fourth overall. The genre entry The Return had no better…

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Jagshemash!

Records fell as Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Making Benefit Glorious of Kazakhstan posted an estimated $25.9 million to ascend to the top of the list for weekend movie going. The session also featured good openings for family fare The Santa Clause 3 and Flushed Away that ranked second and third with respective grosses…

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The Weekend Report

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“I always thought that once I had lived in Chicago for a while, it would be interesting to do a portrait of the city – but to do it at a significant time. Figuring out when would be the ideal time to do that was the trick. So when this election came around, coupled with the Laquan McDonald trial, it seemed like the ideal time to do the story. Having lived in Chicagoland for thirty-five-plus years and done a number of films here, I’ve always been struck by the vibrancy of the city and its toughness. Its tenderness too. I’ve always been interested in the people at the center of all the stories. This is a different film in that regard, because we’re not following a couple of individuals over the course of the project in the way that a lot of the films I’ve done have, but I still feel like people’s voices and aspirations and hopes are at the center of this series.

It wasn’t easy. We started back in July 2018, it was actually on the Fourth of July – that was our first shoot. It’s like most documentaries in that the further you go along the more involved and obsessed you get, and you just start shooting more and more and more. We threw ourselves into this crazy year in Chicago. We got up every day and tried to figure out if we should be out shooting or not, and what it is we should shoot. We were trying to balance following this massive political story of the mayor’s race and these significant moments like the Laquan McDonald trial with taking the pulse of people in the city that we encounter along the way and getting a sense of their lives and what it means to live here. By election day, Zak Piper, our producer, had something like six cameras out in the field. You could double-check that, it might have been seven. We had this organized team effort to hit all the candidates as they were voting, if they hadn’t already voted. We hit tons of polling places, were at the Board of Elections and then were at the parties for the candidates that we had been able to follow closely. Then of course, we were trying to make sure we were at the parties of the candidates who made it to the runoff. So, yeah, it was kind of a monster.”
~ Steve James On City So Real

“I really want to see The Irishman. I’ve heard it’s big brother Martin Scorsese’s masterpiece. But I really can’t find the time. The promotion schedule is so tight, there’s no opportunity to see a three and a half-hour movie. But I really want to see it. In 2017, right before Okja’s New York premiere, I had the chance to go to Scorsese’s office, which is in the DGA building. There’s a lovely screening room there, too, with film prints that he’s collected. I talked to him for about an hour. There’s no movie he hasn’t seen, even Korean films. We talked about what he’s seen and his past work. It was a glorious day. I’ve loved his work since I was in college. Who doesn’t? Anyone involved with movies must feel the same way.”
~ Bong Joon-ho