The Weekend Report Archive for October, 2006

Booooooooo!

More treat than trick commercially speaking, Saw III sliced through the marketplace with an estimated $34.2 million to take command as weekend movie favorite. The frame had only one other national debut with the political thriller Catch a Fire at a low spark of $2.1 million. Activity was torrid in limited and platform bows with…

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Presto … Chango

The Prestige apparently had the magic to ascend to the top of the box office chart with an estimated $14.8 million. In a session that had anticipated Flags of Our Fathers would take the weekend, the saga of the “greatest generation” struggled to $10.2 and ranked third overall. A glut of new product contributed to…

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Very Scarrrrrry

The Grudge 2 chilled an estimated $22.5 million to take top honors in the weekend movie going derby. In a status quo frame, freshmen entries ranged from a disappointing $12.5 million ballot for Man of the Year to a fair $7 million pin for The Marine and a rather upbeat $4.2 million encounter with One…

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More Bang For The Bucks

The Departed left the station with an estimated $26.5 million to claim weekend bragging rights as the session’s top attraction. There were also upbeat returns for freshmen entries The Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Beginning that ranked second with $19.1 million and a fourth place finish for Employee of the Month of $11.7 million. Additionally Trailer…

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Seasons Greetings!

Open Season animated an estimated $23.3 million to lead weekend movie biz with the watery actioner The Guardian not far behind with $17.6 million. The combo registered sufficient muscle to provide a double-digit boost from 2005. The session also featured an OK $8.1 million bow for the comic School for Scoundrels. Additionally limited bows for…

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“There are critics who see their job as to be on the side of the artist, or in a state of imaginative sympathy or alliance with the artist. I think it’s important for a critic to be populist in the sense that we’re on the side of the public. I think one of the reasons is, frankly, capitalism. Whether you’re talking about restaurants or you’re talking about movies, you’re talking about large-scale commercial enterprises that are trying to sell themselves and market themselves and publicize themselves. A critic is, in a way, offering consumer advice. I think it’s very, very important in a time where everything is commercialized, commodified, and branded, where advertising is constantly bleeding into other forms of discourse, for there to be an independent voice kind of speaking to—and to some extent on behalf of—the public.”
~ A. O. Scott On One Role Of The Critic

“Every night, we’d sit and talk for a long, long time and talk about the process and I knew he was very, very intrigued about what could be happening. Then of course, one of the fascinating things he told me about was how he had readers who were reading for him that never knew it was Stanley Kubrick. So if he heard of a novel, he would send it out to people. I think he did it through newspaper ads at the time. And he would send it out to people and ask for a kind of synopsis or a critique of the novel. And he would read those. And it was done anonymously. But he said there were housewives and there were barristers and all sorts of people doing that. And I thought, yeah, that’s a really good way to open up the possibilities. Because otherwise, you’re randomly looking, walking through a bookstore or an airport. I said, “How many people are doing this?” It was about 30 people.”
~ George Miller’s Conversations With Kubrick