The Weekend Report Archive for September, 2006

Jackass or No Jackass!

The American public has voted and in this cinematic deal or no deal the winner was clearly Jackass: Number Two with an estimated opening frame of $27.9 million. Debuting a distant second was the upscale Jet Li actioner Fearless at $9.8 million. The passed over included the First World War heroics of Flyboys with $5.2…

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Ssssssssummer

Invincible toughed it out to nose past a pair of new films and claim top holiday weekend attraction with an estimated $15.3 million. Debuts of the testosterone thriller Crank and the horror remake The Wicker Man were on its tail with respective grosses of $12.2 million and $11.6 million. The close of the summer season…

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Quote Unquotesee all »

“The city to me is the only possible vehicle we have to measure human achievement. We’re an urban species now. If you look at Karachi or Mexico City or Hong Kong or London or New York or Yonkers or Baltimore or any of these other places, the pastoral is now a part of human history. We’re either going to figure out how to live together in these increasingly crowded, increasingly multi-cultural population centers or we’re not. We’re either going to get great at this or we’re going to fail as a species.”
~ David Simon

“I wondered how different it would be to write a novel and it’s totally different. It’s very internal. The weird thing about it is that I found that novel-writing was much more like directing than it is like screenwriting. You’re casting it, you’re lighting it, you’re doing the costumes, you’re doing the locations, you’re doing it all yourself as a director would. In screenwriting, you don’t do that stuff. You don’t describe the face of the actor or the character when you’re writing a screenplay because Tom Cruise is going to do it and he doesn’t look like that, whereas in the novel to describe what he is is what he is. The actual act of writing, just like shooting on a set, is a slow slog. It’s going to work every day.”
~ David Cronenberg On Screenplay vs. Novel