The Weekend Report Archive for April, 2006

Planes, T-r-a-i-n-s and RVsy

Better than anticipated debuts for RV and United 93 once again translated into improved box off ice results with the former comedic hijinx grossing an estimated $16.3 million to rank as the weekend’s top attraction. The frame also saw disappointing bows for the familycentric Stick It and Akeelah and the Bee and good response for…

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Silent Hill… Holy Moly

Silent Hill scared up an estimated $20.3 million to rank as the top attraction at the weekend box office. The frames other debuting fare rated good returns of $14.4 million for the thriller The Sentineland a less than euphoric $3.8 million for the satiric American Dreamz. Overall business dipped modestly from the prior weekend but…

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The Big Chill

Imitation is the sincerest form of film production if Scary Movie 4 is any yardstick of contemporary Hollywood. The horror spoof sequel arrived with an impressive estimate of $40.7 million that provided a significant boost to weekend holiday business. The frame’s other major debut – the animated family yarn The Wild – ranked a disappointing…

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Hot & Cold… and Hot

Despite a sharp 50% decline, Ice Age: The Meltdown remained the top draw in the marketplace with an estimated $34.2 million. Still there was unexpected heat from debuting fare including a potent second place finish for The Benchwarmers and a strong limited launch for Friends with Money. Overall it translated into a significant viewing increase…

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Cool Customer

There’s nothing quite like a hot movie to reinvigorate movie going and Ice Age: The Meltdown needn’t have worried about a chilly reception. The very animated sequel arrived with an estimated $69.3 million that sent revenues and attendance airborne. The film also added $43 million from international bows. The competition was pallid using the Ice…

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The Atlantic: You saw that the Academy Awards recently held up your 2001 acceptance speech as the Platonic ideal of an Oscar speech. Did you have a reaction?

Soderbergh: Shock and dismay. When that popped up and people started texting me about it, I said, “Oh, it’s too bad I’m not there to tell the story of how that took place.” Well. I was not sober at the time. And I had nothing prepared because I knew I wasn’t going to win [Best Director for Traffic]. I figured Ridley, Ang or Daldry would win. So I was hitting the bar pretty hard, having a great night, feeling super-relaxed because I don’t have to get up there. So the combination of a 0.4 blood alcohol level and lack of preparation resulted in me, in my state of drunkenness crossed with adrenaline surge. I was coherent enough to know that [if I tried to thank everyone], that way lies destruction. So I went the other way. There were some people who appreciated that, and there were some people who really wanted to hear their names said, and I had to apologize to them.
~ Steven Soderbergh

 

“I have made few films in a way. I never made action films. I never made science fiction films. I never made, really, very complicated settings, because I had modest ambitions. I knew they would never trust me to have the budget to do something different, so my mind is more focused on things I know. So they were always mental adventures I wanted to approach and share. Working for cinema with no – not only no money, but also no ambition for money. I was happy and proud [to receive the honorary Oscar] because of that, that [the Academy] could understand what kind of work I have done over 60 years. I stayed faithful to the ideal of sharing emotion, impressions, and mostly because I have so much empathy for other people that I approach people who are not really spoken about. I have 65 years of work in my bag, and when I put the bag down, what comes out? It’s really the desire of finding links and relationships with different kinds of people. I never made a film about the bourgeoisie, about rich people. about nobility. My choices have been to show people that are, in a way, more common and see that each of them has something special and interesting, rare and beautiful. It’s my natural way of looking at people. I didn’t fight my instincts. And maybe that has been appreciated in the famous circle of Hollywood.“

Agnes Varda