MCN Weekend

Weekend Report

Weekend (estimates) June 22 – 24, 2018 Title Distributor Gross (average) % change * Theaters Cume Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom Uni 149.8 (33,480) NEW 4475 149.8 Incredibles 2 BV 81.1 (18,390) -56% 4410 350.5 Ocean’s 8 WB 11.7 (3,110) -38% 3656 100.4 Tag WB 8.2 (2,420) -45% 3382 30.4 Deadpool 2 Fox 5.2 (2,150) -40%…

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Friday Box Office Estimates

Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom breaks the all-time record for most $125 million openings in the first 7 months of the year, a success which is reasonably followed by the question of whether there will be any more such openings this year. The record is 6 in one year – 2016 – which included an August and a December release. Meanwhile, the mid-week July 4 holiday is not a friend to JW2… because there is no 3-day or 4-day weekend and the holiday bump (last seen in 2012) is minor at best. It doesn’t hurt, but it doesn’t help much. Strong Friday-to-Friday hold for Incredibles 2 after its massive open last weekend. The King joins Won’t You Be My Neighbor in the 10K per-screeen doc club.

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The DVD Wrapup: Double Lover, Death of Stalin, Flower, Hooked, Alex & Me, Guilty Men, Night of Lepus, Greaser’s Palace, Man in Orange Shirt … More

Double Lover is as different François Ozon’s previous period drama, Franz, as noon is to midnight. The same could be said about most of the movies in Ozon’s credits.

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The Weekend Report

Cinelicious Truly living up to its name Incredibles 2 opened to record-breaking returns estimated at $180.1 million. The animated yarn accounted for about two-thirds of all tickets sold for the frame. Still two other new films attempted a bit of counter-programming with the droll Tag succeeding in grabbing a niche with $14.4 million in third…

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Friday Estimates

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The DVD Wrapup: Loveless, In Syria, Good Postman, Inflame, Ordinary Man, I Called Him Morgan, Jerry Lewis, Will & Grace … More

In the Oscar-nominated Loveless, Andrey Zvyagintsev and co-writer Oleg Negin have crafted a different sort of missing-child story, set among atypically middle-class Muscovites, whose concepts of family and status are far from traditional. Their previous collaborations – Elena, The Banishment and Leviathan – have also required that we look to the east through a different prism. None of Zvyagintsev’s films have been particularly easy to watch, from an emotional point of view. If they present life stripped of contrivances and narrative shortcuts, it’s still the human condition that drives the stories and is never far from their surface.

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The Weekend Report

The girls were back in town as the debut of Ocean’s 8 topped weekend moviegoing with an estimated $41.5 million. Shocker Hereditary exceeded expectations with $12.9 million to rank fourth and dystopian Hotel Artemis opened to a blah $3.1 million. All three new releases were propelled by female performers.

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The DVD Wrapup: Wrinkle in Time, Peter Pan, Hurricane Heist, Oh Lucy!, Freak Show, Great Silence, Smash Palace, Satellite Girl and more

The fact that Ava DuVernay’s highly ambitious, if too frequently inert adaptation went unseen by so many of the book’s admirers speaks volumes.

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The Weekend Report

Despite a sharp sophomore drop Solo: A Star Wars Story held the lead in weekend movie going with an estimated $29.5 million. A trio of new national releases failed to create more than a ripple with Adrift at least providing a respectable start with $11.5 million in third position. The paranoid thriller Upgrade actually exceeded expectations with a $4.4 million start while the stunt hijinx of Action Point pancaked with a grim $2.3 million debut.

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The Weekend Report

Despite a sharp sophomore drop, Solo held the lead with an estimated $29.5 million. A trio of national releases failed to create more than a ripple, with Adrift providing a respectable start with $11.5 million in third. Upgrade exceeded expectations with a $4.4 million start while the stunt hijinks of Action Point pancaked with a grim $2.3 million.

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Friday Box Office Estimates

Solo‘s second weekend is not shocking. But the rest of the media will tell you it is, because they will ride the negativity as long as they can. (Guess: two more weeks). A 77% first-Friday-to-second-Friday drop isn’t the best, but 70% is to be expected (remember, totals now include Thursday night) and 77% is not horrible. But the endless attack on Solo‘s box office absolutely creates damage. And that damage doesn’t accrue to the benefit of any other film… it just tears down Solo. Speaking to a friend who covers Europe, it seems Disney cut back on Solo screens going into the opening… so the blame doesn’t just land with a thoughtless media or a production that never overcame the firing of popular, cutting-edge directors. By far, the most shocking opening of the season is Action Point, which Paramount wanted to get off of its books like a rash. Johnny Knoxville hasn’t opened a stunt-oriented movie at Paramount to less than $29 million in the past (as recently as 2013) and this film won’t likely get to $2.9 million. If no one gets fired next week, you will know that this was intentional.

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The DVD Wrapup: Annihilation, Kaurismäki, Borzage, Sweet Sweetback, Two of Us, Cold Turkey, Weinstein, Jackass and more

Alex Garland is a terrific writer-director who challenges the imagination and rewards viewers, for whom patience a virtue. Garland received sole screenwriter credit on 28 Days Later … (2002), Sunshine (2007), Never Let Me Go (2010) and Dredd (2012), while sharing the writing credit with Tameem Antoniades on the video games and “DmC: Devil May Cry” and “Enslaved: Odyssey to the West.” He also wrote the novels from which The Beach (2000) and The Tesseract (2003), were adapted. None of them enjoyed an easy stroll to the big screen. Those difficulties were a walk in the park compared to the difficulties the London-born author and filmmaker faced getting Ex Machina (2014) and Annihilation into theaters. Together, they represent two of the finest examples of Earth-bound science fiction — or, if you prefer, speculative fiction or cutting-edge fiction – to be produced sequentially, in memory.

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The Weekend Report

Solo debuted at the top of the weekend with an estimated $83.1 million for the three-day portion of the Memorial Day holiday. (All figures reflect three-day box office). It was the sole new national opener but more than the Force contributed to the absence of a competitive counter-programmer. The long weekend was an overall improvement from 2017, but posted a double-digit decline from last weekend’s Deadpool 2 opening.

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DVD Wrapup: Vazante, Early Man, Elis, Swung, Death Smiles, Of Unknown Origin, Swamp Thing 2, Little Women, MST3K Singles and more

Because historical fidelity was vital to her vision, Thomas employed a team of historians and tribal experts to reproduce the lifestyles and clothing of the era. This included a group of non-actors who are descendants of the region’s former slaves. Thomas’ commitment to a slow-burn narrative wouldn’t have worked if it weren’t for Inti Briones’s gorgeous monochromatic cinematography, whose every frame demands to be savored. The explosive final scene anticipates Brazil’s pluralistic society to come, even as it demonstrates how difficult it might be to achieve.

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The Weekend Report

Deadpool 2 swam to the top of weekend viewing with an estimated $124.9 million. The session’s other national newcomers targeted those averse to snark. The golden girls of Book Club charted third with $12.4 million while the kiddie mix of animation and live-action in Show Dogs grossed $6 million.

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Friday Box Office Estimates

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The DVD Wrapup: Black Panther, Forgiven, Monkey King, Sweet Escape, Black Venus, It’s Alive and more

What were Stan Lee and Jack Kirby smoking when they named their new superhero after the militant organization founded by Bobby Seale and Huey P. Newton? Or… what were Seale and Newton smoking when they named the BPP after a comic-book superhero?

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The Weekend Report

Avengers: Infinity War won its third weekend with an estimated $63.2 million. The back-to-school hijinx of Life of the Party was in second spot with $18.3 million followed by the ferocious matriarch of Breaking In with $16.5 million.

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Friday Box Office Estimates

Avengers gets the third weekend with an easy win, as Disney plotted when moving the film back into April to launch the summer a week early. And next week, they will have a Star Wars at #1 and Avengers at #2. It’s good to be the Mouse. Double counterprogramming keep two films from launching to $20m+, but solid sturdy launches that could lead to decent totals if word of mouth is solid for both or either of the films. On the indie side, $10k+ weekend launches for Sony Classics’ The Seagull, Roadside’s Beast, and Magnolia’s Boom For Real.

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The DVD Wrapup: La Belle Noiseuse, 50 Shades Freed, 4K Titles, Paradox, Manifesto, Dear White People, Butterflies and more

“Take My Word for It” might be a better title for this column, especially as it applies to movies that went to straight-to-video or streaming or are made by filmmakers yet to establish reputations. Jacques Rivette’s 1991 masterpiece, La Belle Noiseuse, doesn’t fit those categories, but, with its four-hour length and ready availability of an inferior 125-minute cut, La Belle Noiseuse: Divertimento, Cohen Media’s upgraded Blu-ray may benefit from any endorsement. La Belle Noiseuse (The Beautiful Troublemaker) won the Grand Prize of the Jury at Cannes and was nominated for a Palme d’Or. Roger Ebert called it “the best film I have ever seen about the physical creation of art, and about the painful bond between an artist and his muse.” The great Japanese director Akira Kurosawa named it one of his two favorite movies of the 1990s — with Takeshi Kitano’s Fireworks – calling it the best filmed display of a struggle of an artist doing his craft, as well as a movie he would have liked to have directed.

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MCN Weekend

Quote Unquotesee all »

“Because of my relative candor on Twitter regarding why I quit my day job, my DMs have overflowed with similar stories from colleagues around the globe. These peeks behind the curtains of film festivals, venues, distributors and funding bodies weren’t pretty. Certain dismal patterns recurred (and resonated): Boards who don’t engage with or even understand their organization’s artistic mission and are insensitive to the diverse neighborhood in which their organization’s venue is located; incompetent founders and/or presidents who create only obstacles, never solutions; unduly empowered, Trumpian bean counters who chip away at the taste and experiences that make organizations’ cultural offerings special; expensive PR teams that don’t bring to the table a bare-minimum familiarity with the rich subcultural art form they’re half-heartedly peddling as “product”; nonprofit arts organizations for whom art now ranks as a distant-second goal behind profit.”
~ Eric Allen Hatch

To me, Hunter S. Thompson was a hero. His early books were great, but in many ways, his life and career post–Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail is a cautionary tale for authors. People expected him to be high and drunk all the time and play that persona, and he stuck with that to the end, and I don’t think it was good for him. I always sort of feel mixed emotions when I hear that people went and hung out with Hunter and how great it was to get high with Hunter. The fact is the guy was having difficulty doing any sustained writing at all for years probably because so many quote, unquote, “friends” wanted to get high with him … There was a badly disappointed romantic there. I mean, that great line, “This is where the wave broke, the tide rolled back … ” This was a guy that was hurt and disappointed and very bitter about things, and it made his writing beautiful, and also with that came a lot of pain.
~ Anthony Bourdain