The Hobbit: Battle of the Five Armies

MCN Curated Headlines

NY Times

The extradition request “deliberately omitted the fact that Polanski has already served the term of imprisonment imposed by the trial judge.”
Alan Dershowitz Petitions LA County To Allow Him To Represent Roman Polanski

NY Times

“A broad threat of theater violence, following a sustained attack on Sony’s digital existence, is also without precedent, and opens a new range of worry for Hollywood.”
Ciepley & Barnes On Edge Of Panic In Describing Tuesday’s Hacker Theater Threat

“Right now I’m mostly writing, I’ve got a painting going and I’m building a chair. I love to build things and this is for a monkey film. I’m working with a monkey named Jack and that’ll come out sometime. It is not a chimpanzee, the monkey came up from South America.”
Yes, Yes, It’s David Lynch

NY Times

“There was a lot of discussion. But it’s not an edgy position to take. It’s not like, ‘Well, politically, you’ve got to look at both sides.’ He is bad. It’s controversial to him. But to everyone else, it’s fine. To their credit, [Sony] let us do it.”
Dave Itzkoff Interviews Interview Subjects Rogen And Franco Before The Latest Hacks

“The film traffics in absurd cultural appropriation and brown-faced minstrel casting/makeup techniques to rewrite African history as European history, and in so doing propagates the idea that European cultural centrality is more important than historical fact and the ever-evolving self-image of African-descended people as it is influenced by popular representations of people of color in Western media distributed worldwide.”
Filmmaker Terence Nance Compares Exodus: Gods And Kings To Birth Of A Nation

“What the movie industry is about, in 2014, is creating a sense of anticipation in its target audience that is so heightened, so nurtured, and so constant that moviegoers are effectively distracted from how infrequently their expectations are actually satisfied.”
Says Mark Harris

deadline

“Bingo, I thought. Weighing moral obligation versus the public’s right to know has been lifted out of the abstract —’I would never traffic in stolen goods’—and into the very high-profile world of the culture business. It’s a debate similar to the one that has engaged the Beltway punditocracy over the revelations in Edward Snowden’s, you know, dump.”
Jeremy Gerard Masticates Sony Hack In Tin-Eared Tick-Tock

deadline

“Sifting through the material, I find myself asking this question of Amy Pascal: Some of your alleged comments and responses display clear signs of combat fatigue, Amy. You are good at what you do, but you’ve been at it for a couple of decades. You’ve begun to talk the brutish talk of the Scott Rudins of the industry and tolerate their thuggish power plays. At what point are you ready to say, ‘I’ve caused some marvelous films to happen but the sheer ‘noise’ of the business is getting to me.’
Peter Bart Banters Sony Hack, Opines As If “Satire” Was First Lingo For Him

“It’s an important story, and it needs to be told the way it was originally written, and I’ve got Chevy Chase interested in it, and you have no! —-ng!! Right!!!””
Patton Oswalt On How His Live-Read Of Jerry Lewis’ “The Day The Clown Cried” Was Finally Foiled

NY Times

“Sony’s executives now say they knew that basing a film on the assassination of a living national leader—even a ruthless dictator—had inherent risks. But the studio seems to have gotten much more than it bargained for by bankrolling what it hoped would be an edgy comedy.”
Understatement At The Times

NY Times

“Because I and two movies of mine get a little dinged up, I feel I have the credibility to say this: I don’t care. Because the minor insults that were revealed are such small potatoes compared to the fact that they were revealed. Not by the hackers, but by American journalists helping them.”
Aaron Sorkin Op-Eds That “Journalists Shouldn’t Help Criminals”

MCN Curated Headlines

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“Yes, good movies sprout up, inevitably, in the cracks and seams between the tectonic plates on which all of these franchises stay balanced, and we are reassured of their hardiness. But we don’t see what we don’t see; we don’t see the effort, or the cost of the effort, or the movies of which we’re deprived because of the cost of the effort. Paul Thomas Anderson’s Inherent Vice may have come from a studio, but it still required a substantial chunk of outside financing, and at $35 million, it’s not even that expensive. No studio could find the $8.5 million it cost Dan Gilroy to make Nightcrawler. Birdman cost a mere $18 million and still had to scrape that together at the last minute. Imagine American movie culture for the last few years without Her or Foxcatcher or American Hustle or The Master or Zero Dark Thirty and it suddenly looks markedly more frail—and those movies exist only because of the fairy godmothership of independent producer Megan Ellison. The grace of billionaires is not a great business model on which to hang the hopes of an art form.”
~ Mark Harris On The State Of The Movies

How do you make a Top Ten list? For tax and organizational purposes, I keep a log of every movie I see (Title, year, director, exhibition format, and location the film was viewed in). Anything with an asterisk to the left of its title means it’s a 2014 release (or something I saw at a festival which is somehow in play for the year). If there’s a performance, or sequence, or line of dialogue, even, that strikes me in a certain way, I’ll make a note of it. So when year end consideration time (that is, the month and change out of the year where I feel valued) rolls around, it’s a little easier to go through and pull some contenders for categories. For 2014, I’m voting in three polls: Indiewire, SEFCA (my critics’ guild), and the Muriels. Since Indiewire was first, it required the most consternation. There were lots of films that I simply never had a chance to see, so I just went with my gut. SEFCA requires a lot of hemming and hawing and trying to be strategic, even though there’s none of the in-person skullduggery that I hear of from folk whose critics’ guild is all in the same city. The Muriels is the most fun to contribute to because it’s after the meat market phase of awards season. Also, because it’s at the beginning of next year, I’ll generally have been able to see everything I wanted to by then. I love making hierarchical lists, partially because they are so subjective and mercurial. Every critical proclamation is based on who you are at that moment and what experiences you’ve had up until that point. So they change, and that’s okay. It’s all a weird game of timing and emotional waveforms, and I’m sure a scientist could do an in-depth dissection of the process that leads to the discovery of shocking trends in collective evaluation. But I love the year end awards crush, because I feel somewhat respected and because I have a wild-and-wooly work schedule that has me bouncing around the city to screenings, or power viewing the screeners I get sent.
Jason Shawhan of Nashville Scene Answers CriticWire 

The Hobbit: Battle of the Five Armies