Z

MCN Curated Headlines

“I want to enter someone else’s life and learn something. A lot of gay men have boyfriends that look like them. Mine are never age-appropriate. Most of my men friends that are successful in the arts do not have age-appropriate boyfriends.When you’re 68, 40s are young. Things work or they don’t.”
Thelma Adams And John Waters Have A Small Sit-down

NY Times

“Everybody is too eager to forgive, forget and move on. I guess that goes for me too.”
A. O. Scott Misses Cameron Crowe, Still

NY Times

“We are now in such a phase with Russia, you never know what really can happen.”
After Release Of Doc Critical Of Putin Friend, 33-Year-Old Russian Activist In Coma

variety

“Unbalanced, unwieldy, and at times nearly unintelligible, “Aloha” is unquestionably Cameron Crowe’s worst film. Paced like a record on the wrong speed, or a Nancy Meyers movie recut by an overcaffeinated Jean-Luc Godard, the film bears all the telltale signs of a poorly-executed salvage operation disfigured in the editing bay. But as far as misfires from great American filmmakers go, it’s a fascinating one, less a simple failed Cameron Crowe film than a total deconstruction.”
Variety’s Review: 3 Hours, 20 Minutes Before Aloha Embargo Ends

“At this point, you know what you’re getting with a Cameron Crowe movie: a sad white guy trying to find himself, a series of on-the-nose music cues, and a bunch of great actors who don’t get much to do.”
The Stranger Says Aloha To An Embargo
But – The Wichita Eagle Goes 404 With Its Early Review

“There are whole generations of moviegoers for whom jetpacks don’t mean —-, whose first memories of NASA are the Challenger disaster. And you know what? Those same generations believe in driverless cars, solar energy, smart cities, AR contacts, and vat-grown meat.”
Futurist Madeline Ashby On Optimism Onscreen: “No One Cares About Your Jetpack”

MCN Curated Headlines

Z

Quote Unquotesee all »

“We don’t defy the laws of physics: There are no flying men or cars in this movie. So it made sense to do it old-school: real vehicles and real human beings in the desert. We shot the movie more or less in continuity, because the cars and the characters get really banged up along the way. The biggest benefit of digital technology for me was that the cameras were smaller and much more agile, so you could put them anywhere. We also spent a huge amount of time on spatial awareness—making sure the viewer could follow the action and understand what was happening. There has to be a strong causal connection from one shot to the next, just the same way that in music, there has to be a connection from one note to the next. Otherwise it’s just noise. Too often, if you just cram a lot of stuff into the frame, you get the illusion of a fast pace. But there’s no coherence. It doesn’t flow. It comes off as headbanging music, and it can be exhausting. We storyboarded the movie before we had a script: We had 3,500 boards, which helps the cast and crew understand how everything is going to fit together. Movies are getting faster and faster. The Road Warrior had 1,200 cuts. This one has 2,700 cuts. You have to treat it like a symphony.”
~ George Miller

“I was having issues with my script for It’s All About Love, so I called Ingmar Bergman and we ended up talking about everything but the script. He said, “Well, Festen is a masterpiece, so what are you going to do now?” At that point, I had not decided if I was going to make It’s All About Love, so I answered, “Hmmm, I don’t know. Maybe this, maybe that.” There was just a long pause, and then he said, “You’re fucked.” I said, “Well, how can you know?” “Well, Thomas, you always have to decide your next movie before the movie you’re doing presently opens.” And I said, “Why is that?” “Well, two things can happen. One thing is that you fail, and then you’ll feel scared and humiliated. It’ll get into your head. Second, and even worse, you have success, and then you’ll want more of it, or you’ll want to maintain it. But if you decide on your next film while you’re in the middle of editing, it becomes a very nonchalant choice. And then it’s shorter from the heart to the hand.”
~ Thomas Vinterberg

Z Z