Awards Archive for February, 2009

The Weekend That Was

Things have changed a lot over the years

4 Comments »

More Slumavation

ACE Awards…
BEST EDITED FEATURE FILM (DRAMATIC):
SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE
Chris Dickens
BEST EDITED FEATURE FILM (COMEDY OR MUSICAL):
WALL-E
Stephen Schaffer
BEST EDITED DOCUMENTARY:
Man on Wire
Jinx Godfrey
STUDENT EDITING COMPETITION
Junna Xiao

1 Comment »

Slumdog Wins Another Award… Shocker, Huh?

Los Angeles 14 February 2009

33 Comments »

BAFTA As Predictor

I don’t want to spend too much time on this, but…
All four acting slots that won BAFTA the last two years won Oscars.
In both of those last two years, only one of the four slots was really a surprise of any kind… Tilda last year and Alan Arkin the year before. Huzzah – even though guessing the Oscars is not really the point – for them.
Before that, they were about .500 predicting acting wins.
No other categories are reliable in any way.
Thank you for your momentary attention.

4 Comments »

Images From A Season

fincherbafta.jpg
I was really struck by a quick reaction shot of David Fincher at BAFTA yesterday… his face seemed to say it all… “how did we become an also-ran?”…
Thing is, Fincher and everyone at Paramount has been nothing but gracious as the year that was supposed to be theirs became the Year of the ‘Dog. In the end, there is nothing more (or less) that they could have done. In the end, in this year as in almost every other one, it is the movies that guide the awards’ final destination. And for all the magnificent craft of BB, it seems the awards world’s heart belongs to Danny.
Sigh…

12 Comments »

BAFTA Has Spoken…

Okay… here is a list of winners
I will comment – 100% SPOLIERS – after the jump…

Read the full article »

27 Comments »

BAFTA Rolls Along…

The Guardian is live-blogging the event from inside the theater.
Oh, how I hate live-blogging.
It’s funny… when I talk to people about Blu-ray BD-Live features, like IMing during a synced movie, they almost always get a vomitty look on their face. But for me, I consider that in that case, kids have almost invariably seen the film over and over again on the Blu-ray or regular DVD and that the interaction is, indeed, of some value. Like a director

2 Comments »

Gus van Sant Shoots Dustin Lance Black For Vogue Paris pour Hommes

milkvogue2.jpg
The awards season brings out the weird in many people.
How I came to end up with a copy of what purports to be the Fall/Winter edition of Vogue Hommes International with a photo shoot that Gus van Sant shot and Dustin Lance Black posed for in various states of dress and undress is really not the point.
But to the studio that feels slammed and endangered by the images in this profile, written by Bruce Benderson and Philippe Garnier, it is a low blow meant to derail their movie

11 Comments »

Quote Unquotesee all »

“I’m an ardent consumer of Fassbinder. Years ago, when I heard that he was a big admirer of Douglas Sirk, I went straight to the source — to the buffet Fassbinder dined out on — and found that there was plenty more. And what palettes! I love the look of Fassbinder movies. Some of them are also hideous in a way that’s really exciting. When you go to Sirk, it’s more standardized. The movies produced by Ross Hunter — those really lush, Technicolor ones. I know Sirk was a painter and considered himself a painter first for a long time. He really knew how to work his palettes and worked closely with whatever art director he had. I was a guest speaker for the Technicolor series at TIFF Bell Lightbox and we screened Magnificent Obsession. To prepare for that, I watched the movie with a pen and paper. I wroteto down the names of the palettes. Soon, I realized those general color terms weren’t good enough. I used to be a house painter and I remembered the great names of the 10,000 different colors you could get in a paint chip book. So, I started to try to name the colors. Sirk used 100 different off-whites, especially in the surgery scenes in Magnificent Obsession!”
~ Guy Maddin On Sirk And Fassbinder

“I’ve never been lumped in with other female directors. If anything, I’ve been compared way too much to male filmmakers whom I have little to nothing in common with except visual style. It’s true that women’s filmmaking is incredibly diverse, but I am personally interested in how female consciousness might shape artwork differently, especially in the way female characters are constructed. So I actually would encourage people to try to group women’s films together to see if there are any threads that connect them, and to try to create a sort of canon of women’s films that critics can talk about as women’s films. One reason I want to be thought of as a female filmmaker is that my work can only be understood in that context. So many critics want to see my work as a pastiche of films that men have created. When they do that, they deny the fact that I am creating my own world, something completely original. Women are so often thought of as being unable to make meaning. So they are allowed to copy what men make—to make a pastiche out of what men have created—but not to create original work. My work comes from a place of being female, and rewrites film genres from that place. So it’s essential for me to be placed into a history of female-feminist art-making practice, otherwise it’s taking the work completely out of context.”
~ Love Witch Writer-Designer-Director Anna Biller