The Hot Blog Archive for August, 2006

Embargoing Too Far?

In the course of his regular schtick of calling out quote whores, UGO’s Erik Childress does a much more interesting piece on the status of The Embargo in Hollywood these days.
His perspective, from Chicago, causes him to make a few missteps in his opinion sifting. And that

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DOAP

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
PRESIDENT BUSH ASSASSINATION FILM MAKES ITS WORLD PREMIERE AT THE 2006 TORONTO INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL
New York, NY (August 31, 2006) – The Toronto International Film Festival released new details today regarding a film in their line-up. Previously referred to as D.O.A.P., the film’s actual title is DEATH OF A PRESIDENT. This fictional drama, which mixes archival footage with narrative elements, focuses on the assassination of President George W. Bush in the style of a retrospective documentary. DEATH OF A PRESIDENT makes its world premiere in the festival’s Visions section on September 10th at 8:30 p.m. at the Paramount 3 Theatre in Toronto.
“We

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Filler? I Hardly Know Her!

I’m sure there is something worth discussing here on the blog today…. but damned if I know what it is!

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Monday Monday…

I don’t know when I will be back at at he computer today… so here is a free-for-all page… have at it…
Here’s Monday’s Hot Button to chew on…

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Another Case Of Idiotic Non-News Hype

The opening of the Emmy Awards on Sunday night was a 5-minute sketch that ran across six different Emmy winning shows at a cost of no less than half a million dollars.
And there was a tragic plane accident in Kentucky that killed 49 people after the plane failed to take off at 6am this morning.
The first show that was part of the Emmy package was Lost, which started its run with a mid-air plane crash.
And now, a Kentucky TV station general manager, Matt Drudge and others seem to think that the sketch, which involves the air mishap joke for all of 22 seconds, is a national embarrassment. (You can see the 22 seconds and not the whole 5 minute segment, which also makes light of Tom Cruise’s sexuality and the child molester-catching episodes of Dateline here.) Ultimately, the joke of the Lost bit was that it was invited to the Emmys last year and not this year.
Are we really that sensitive that a joke about a TV show gets couched into some sort of condemnable insensitivity to a real life tragedy? And will we in the media ever see anything with clear eyes instead of as a self-promotional opportunity again?

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More Toronto Trailers

La Tourneuse de pages
The Wind That Shakes The Barley
Quelques jours en Septembre
Shortbus
One To Another (via Twitch)
Severance (via Twitch)
And last week’s list, with links that do work if you click through.
PLUS – A non-fest trailer for a sexy Spanish female hitwoman flick owned by Sony International

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Weekend Estimates by Klady – 8/27/06

Another weekend without much worth discussing.
The Devil Wears Prada finally cracked $120 million.
Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man

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Friday Estimates by Klady – 8/26/06

A fairly ugly weekend heating up

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Box Office Hell – 8/25/06

bohell825.jpg

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And What Did You Think?

And so, with the summer at an end, what were your favorite moments, worst moments, and most memorable moments… on or off screen…

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Lunch With David VII – Cruise Control

“Have you picked a side yet?”
Here it is…

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20 Weeks Of Summer Are Over

We started with Tom Cruise and we end with Tom Cruise

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Flies On Shit

Been out all day… just back in time to be disgusted by the ongoing pile-on of Traditional and Online Media over the decidedly minor Tom Cruise story.
We have crossed over into tabloid hell.
At least Mel Gibson actually drove drunk, he was actually arrested, and he actually said anti-semetic things.
Yes, I was a monkey in the monkey tree yesterday. But this story has overstayed its welcome. And like Gibson, will be a non-story in all of two weeks.
And really, shouldn’t we all be embarrassed to be trying to capture attention by leveraging Tom Cruise’s business relationship?

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The Hot Blog

Quote Unquotesee all »

What do you make of the criticism directed at the film that the biopic genre or format is intrinsically bourgeois? That’s the most crazy criticism. That’s an excuse for not engaging with the content of the movie. Film critics sometimes, you know, can be very lazy.

Come on, formal criticism is valuable too. But I’m amazed when this is the thing they put in front of the discourse. My situation is that I’m dealing with a highly explosive subject, a taboo subject that nobody wants to deal with.

Karl Marx? Yes, this is the first film ever in the Western world about Marx. And I managed to make an almost mainstream film out of it. You want me at the same time to play the artist and do a risky film about the way my camera moves and the way I edit? No, it’s complicated enough! The artistic challenge — and it took me ten years with Pascal to write this story — was the writing. That was the most difficult part. We were making a film about the evolution of an idea, which is impossible. To be able to have political discourse in a scene, and you can follow it, and it’s not simplified, and it’s historically true. This is the accomplishment. So when someone criticizes the formal aspects without seeing that first, for me, it’s laziness or ignorance. There’s an incapacity to deal with what’s on the table. I make political films about today, I’m not making a biopic to make a biopic. I don’t believe in being an artist just to be an artist. And by the way, this film cost $9 million. I dare anyone in the United States to make this film for $9 million.
Raoul Peck on The Young Karl Marx

“The Motion Picture Academy, at considerable expense and with great efficiency, runs all the nominated pictures at its own theater, showing each picture twice, once in the afternoon, once in the evening. A nominated picture is one in connection with which any kind of work is nominated for an award, not necessarily acting, directing, or writing; it may be a purely technical matter such as set-dressing or sound work. This running of pictures has the object of permitting the voters to look at films which they may happen to have missed or to have partly forgotten. It is an attempt to make them realize that pictures released early in the year, and since overlaid with several thicknesses of battered celluloid, are still in the running and that consideration of only those released a short time before the end of the year is not quite just.

“The effort is largely a waste. The people with votes don’t go to these showings. They send their relatives, friends, or servants. They have had enough of looking at pictures, and the voices of destiny are by no means inaudible in the Hollywood air. They have a brassy tone, but they are more than distinct.”All this is good democracy of a sort. We elect Congressmen and Presidents in much the same way, so why not actors, cameramen, writers, and all rest of the people who have to do with the making of pictures? If we permit noise, ballyhoo, and theater to influence us in the selection of the people who are to run the country, why should we object to the same methods in the selection of meritorious achievements in the film business? If we can huckster a President into the White House, why cannot we huckster the agonized Miss Joan Crawford or the hard and beautiful Miss Olivia de Havilland into possession of one of those golden statuettes which express the motion picture industry’s frantic desire to kiss itself on the back of its neck? The only answer I can think of is that the motion picture is an art. I say this with a very small voice. It is an inconsiderable statement and has a hard time not sounding a little ludicrous. Nevertheless it is a fact, not in the least diminished by the further facts that its ethos is so far pretty low and that its techniques are dominated by some pretty awful people.

“If you think most motion pictures are bad, which they are (including the foreign), find out from some initiate how they are made, and you will be astonished that any of them could be good. Making a fine motion picture is like painting “The Laughing Cavalier” in Macy’s basement, with a floorwalker to mix your colors for you. Of course most motion pictures are bad. Why wouldn’t they be?”
~ Raymond Chandler, “Oscar Night In Hollywood,” 1948