Movie City Indie Archive for November, 2016

“Under The Influence”: Barry Jenkins on Wong Kar-wai

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Scenes From Editor Anne V. Coates’ Governor’s Award

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Scenes From Frederick Wiseman’s Governors’ Award



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Criterion Video-Tributes Raoul Coutard (4’43” vid)

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Media Nonprofits Solicit In Current Moment: IDA, The Baffler

THE INDEPENDENT DOCUMENTARY ASSOCIATION

A Message from the IDA
Documentary storytelling expands our understanding of shared human experience, fostering an informed, compassionate and connected world. That’s the first sentence of our mission statement. It’s what we believe and why we do what we do.
At the moment there is a lot of uncertainty about what this election and incoming administration will mean for many of the values we hold dear and the issues we care most deeply about. But it is absolutely certain that the work of independent documentary makers is more important now than ever. And we know that makes our work supporting this community more important than ever.
The IDA has always highlighted the vital role that documentary artists, activists and journalists play in our democracy. And in the days and years ahead, we promise to support you as you tell important stories that shine a light on dark places, call out injustice and speak truth to power. As an organization, we will work hard to defend your rights and amplify your voices.
As a community, you are resourceful, scrappy, passionate and brave. Keep making movies. Keep making a difference.
We see this new reality we’re facing as an opportunity to redouble our efforts, so we want to hear from you about how we can best support our community. Reach out to us at listen@documentary.org or by responding to this letter.
In partnership,
The IDA

THE BAFFLER

Dear friend,

I’m thirty-four. I voted for the first time in 2000. Now, for the second time in my adult life, we face the prospect of a right-wing idiot in the White House, surrounded by the scum of the earth as his appointees and advisers. And, amazingly, this time around the nation’s future looks even more grim. We hope you’ll agree that the work of The Baffler is going to be crucial in the time ahead.


We have the best analyses of what’s wrong with the American political, media, and business establishment—and we will help figure out the best strategies for fighting a new breed of fascism with American characteristics. Reading The Baffler will be a source of solace, of community in the face of danger, and of constructive suggestions in the face of helplessness.


The Baffler Foundation, our parent organization that exists solely to publish the magazine, relies mostly on donations. As we enter this perilous era, please give now and help us get the intellectual fight back into gear before it’s too late.

Yours,
Noah McCormack
Publisher

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Movie City Indie

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“I was 15 when I first watched Sally Hardesty escape into the back of a pickup truck, covered in blood and cackling like a goddamn witch. All of her friends were dead. She had been kidnapped, tortured and even forced to feed her own blood to her cannibalistic captors’ impossibly shriveled patriarch. Being new to the horror genre, I was sure she was going to die. It had been a few months since I survived a violent sexual assault, where I subsequently ran from my assailant, tripped, fell and fought like hell. I crawled home with bloody knees, makeup-stained cheeks and a new void in both my mind and heart. My sense of safety, my ability to trust others, my willingness to form new relationships and my love of spending time with people I cared about were all taken from me. It wasn’t until I found the original The Texas Chain Saw Massacre that something clicked. It was Sally’s strength, and her resilience. It was watching her survive blows to the head from a hammer. It was watching her break free from her bonds and burst through a glass window. It was watching her get back up after she’d been stabbed. It was watching her crawl into the back of a truck, laughing as it drove away from Leatherface. She was the last one to confront the killer, and live. I remember sitting in front of the TV and thinking, There I am. That’s me.”
~ Lauren Milici On “The Final Girl”

“‘Thriller’ enforced its own reality principle; it was there, part of the every commute, a serenade to every errand, a referent to every purchase, a fact of every life. You didn’t have to like it, you only had to acknowledge it. By July 6, 1984, when the Jacksons played the first show of their ‘Victory’ tour, in Kansas City, Missouri, Jacksonism had produced a system of commodification so complete that whatever and whoever was admitted to it instantly became a new commodity. People were no longer comsuming commodities as such things are conventionally understood (records, videos, posters, books, magazines, key rings, earrings necklaces pins buttons wigs voice-altering devices Pepsis t-shirts underwear hats scarves gloves jackets – and why were there no jeans called Bille Jeans?); they were consuming their own gestures of consumption. That is, they were consuming not a Tayloristic Michael Jackson, or any licensed facsimile, but themselves. Riding a Mobius strip of pure capitalism, that was the transubstantiation.”
~ Greil Marcus On Michael Jackson