Movie City Indie Archive for November, 2016

“Under The Influence”: Barry Jenkins on Wong Kar-wai

Trailering Richard Kelly’s DONNIE DARKO Restoration (1’35”)

Scenes From Editor Anne V. Coates’ Governor’s Award

Scenes From Frederick Wiseman’s Governors’ Award



Jon Brion On PUNCH-DRUNK LOVE And The H’wd Musical (2’40”)

Criterion Video-Tributes Raoul Coutard (4’43” vid)

Media Nonprofits Solicit In Current Moment: IDA, The Baffler

THE INDEPENDENT DOCUMENTARY ASSOCIATION

A Message from the IDA
Documentary storytelling expands our understanding of shared human experience, fostering an informed, compassionate and connected world. That’s the first sentence of our mission statement. It’s what we believe and why we do what we do.
At the moment there is a lot of uncertainty about what this election and incoming administration will mean for many of the values we hold dear and the issues we care most deeply about. But it is absolutely certain that the work of independent documentary makers is more important now than ever. And we know that makes our work supporting this community more important than ever.
The IDA has always highlighted the vital role that documentary artists, activists and journalists play in our democracy. And in the days and years ahead, we promise to support you as you tell important stories that shine a light on dark places, call out injustice and speak truth to power. As an organization, we will work hard to defend your rights and amplify your voices.
As a community, you are resourceful, scrappy, passionate and brave. Keep making movies. Keep making a difference.
We see this new reality we’re facing as an opportunity to redouble our efforts, so we want to hear from you about how we can best support our community. Reach out to us at listen@documentary.org or by responding to this letter.
In partnership,
The IDA

THE BAFFLER

Dear friend,

I’m thirty-four. I voted for the first time in 2000. Now, for the second time in my adult life, we face the prospect of a right-wing idiot in the White House, surrounded by the scum of the earth as his appointees and advisers. And, amazingly, this time around the nation’s future looks even more grim. We hope you’ll agree that the work of The Baffler is going to be crucial in the time ahead.


We have the best analyses of what’s wrong with the American political, media, and business establishment—and we will help figure out the best strategies for fighting a new breed of fascism with American characteristics. Reading The Baffler will be a source of solace, of community in the face of danger, and of constructive suggestions in the face of helplessness.


The Baffler Foundation, our parent organization that exists solely to publish the magazine, relies mostly on donations. As we enter this perilous era, please give now and help us get the intellectual fight back into gear before it’s too late.

Yours,
Noah McCormack
Publisher

Movie City Indie

Quote Unquotesee all »

“BATTLE OF THE SEXES: Politics and queerness as spectacle/spectacle as politics and queerness. Pretty delightful, lovely, erotic. A-

“Not since EASY A and CABARET have I seen Emma Stone give a real sense of her range. Here, she has pathos and interiority and desire. I love the cinematography and the ways in which the images of the tennis icons are refracted and manipulated via various surfaces/mediators. Also, wild how a haircut is one of the most erotic scenes in cinema this year. Spine tinglingly tactile that feels refreshing. Proof that *cough* you don’t need to be ~graphic/explicit~ to be erotic *cough*. Also, it made me want to get into tennis. Watching it, at least.

“There are interesting touches and intimations as to the cinematic nature of sports, & unpacking the formal approach of broadcasting sports.Also, I was here for Sarah Silverman smoking. And also, hi Mickey Sumner!! It’s a really interesting film about the ways in which public spectacle is never apolitical, and how spectacle is prone to assignation.

“There’s this one other scene from BATTLE OF THE SEXES that I love, and it’s the one in the bar. You see Billie looking after Marilyn as she dances. Through a crowd. There’s a paradoxical closeness and distance between them. In the purple light, and the kitschy decor, everything is distorted. But Billie catches a glance and you can feel the nervous swell inside.”
~ Kyle Turner

“Our business is complicated because intimacy is part and parcel of our profession; as actors we are paid to do very intimate things in public. That’s why someone can have the audacity to invite you to their home or hotel and you show up. Precisely because of this we must stay vigilant and ensure that the professional intimacy is not abused. I hope we are in a pivotal moment where a sisterhood — and brotherhood of allies — is being formed in our industry. I hope we can form a community where a woman can speak up about abuse and not suffer another abuse by not being believed and instead being ridiculed. That’s why we don’t speak up — for fear of suffering twice, and for fear of being labeled and characterized by our moment of powerlessness. Though we may have endured powerlessness at the hands of Harvey Weinstein, by speaking up, speaking out and speaking together, we regain that power. And we hopefully ensure that this kind of rampant predatory behavior as an accepted feature of our industry dies here and now. Now that we are speaking, let us never shut up about this kind of thing. I speak up to make certain that this is not the kind of misconduct that deserves a second chance. I speak up to contribute to the end of the conspiracy of silence.”
Lupita Nyong’o