Movie City Indie Archive for November, 2016

“Under The Influence”: Barry Jenkins on Wong Kar-wai

Trailering Richard Kelly’s DONNIE DARKO Restoration (1’35”)

Scenes From Editor Anne V. Coates’ Governor’s Award

Scenes From Frederick Wiseman’s Governors’ Award



Jon Brion On PUNCH-DRUNK LOVE And The H’wd Musical (2’40”)

Criterion Video-Tributes Raoul Coutard (4’43” vid)

Media Nonprofits Solicit In Current Moment: IDA, The Baffler

THE INDEPENDENT DOCUMENTARY ASSOCIATION

A Message from the IDA
Documentary storytelling expands our understanding of shared human experience, fostering an informed, compassionate and connected world. That’s the first sentence of our mission statement. It’s what we believe and why we do what we do.
At the moment there is a lot of uncertainty about what this election and incoming administration will mean for many of the values we hold dear and the issues we care most deeply about. But it is absolutely certain that the work of independent documentary makers is more important now than ever. And we know that makes our work supporting this community more important than ever.
The IDA has always highlighted the vital role that documentary artists, activists and journalists play in our democracy. And in the days and years ahead, we promise to support you as you tell important stories that shine a light on dark places, call out injustice and speak truth to power. As an organization, we will work hard to defend your rights and amplify your voices.
As a community, you are resourceful, scrappy, passionate and brave. Keep making movies. Keep making a difference.
We see this new reality we’re facing as an opportunity to redouble our efforts, so we want to hear from you about how we can best support our community. Reach out to us at listen@documentary.org or by responding to this letter.
In partnership,
The IDA

THE BAFFLER

Dear friend,

I’m thirty-four. I voted for the first time in 2000. Now, for the second time in my adult life, we face the prospect of a right-wing idiot in the White House, surrounded by the scum of the earth as his appointees and advisers. And, amazingly, this time around the nation’s future looks even more grim. We hope you’ll agree that the work of The Baffler is going to be crucial in the time ahead.


We have the best analyses of what’s wrong with the American political, media, and business establishment—and we will help figure out the best strategies for fighting a new breed of fascism with American characteristics. Reading The Baffler will be a source of solace, of community in the face of danger, and of constructive suggestions in the face of helplessness.


The Baffler Foundation, our parent organization that exists solely to publish the magazine, relies mostly on donations. As we enter this perilous era, please give now and help us get the intellectual fight back into gear before it’s too late.

Yours,
Noah McCormack
Publisher

Movie City Indie

Quote Unquotesee all »

“Ten years ago at Telluride, I said on a panel that theatrical distribution was dying. It seemed obvious to me. I was surprised how many in the audience violently objected: ‘People will always want to go to the movies!’ That’s true, but it’s also true that theatrical cinema as we once knew it has died. Theatrical cinema is now Event Cinema, just as theatrical plays and musical performances are Events. No one just goes to a movie. It’s a planned occasion. Four types of Event Cinema remain.
1. Spectacle (IMAX-style blockbusters)
2. Family (cartoon like features)
3. Horror (teen-driven), and
4. Film Club (formerly arthouse but now anything serious).

There are isolated pockets like black cinema, romcom, girl’s-night-out, seniors, teen gross-outs, but it’s primarily those four. Everything else is TV. Now I have to go back to episode five of ‘Looming Tower.'”
~ Paul Schrader

“Because of my relative candor on Twitter regarding why I quit my day job, my DMs have overflowed with similar stories from colleagues around the globe. These peeks behind the curtains of film festivals, venues, distributors and funding bodies weren’t pretty. Certain dismal patterns recurred (and resonated): Boards who don’t engage with or even understand their organization’s artistic mission and are insensitive to the diverse neighborhood in which their organization’s venue is located; incompetent founders and/or presidents who create only obstacles, never solutions; unduly empowered, Trumpian bean counters who chip away at the taste and experiences that make organizations’ cultural offerings special; expensive PR teams that don’t bring to the table a bare-minimum familiarity with the rich subcultural art form they’re half-heartedly peddling as “product”; nonprofit arts organizations for whom art now ranks as a distant-second goal behind profit.”
~ Eric Allen Hatch