Movie City Indie Archive for October, 2015

Long-Awaited OUT 1 Video Release Delayed Until January 2016

Kino Lorber
Kino Lorber and Carlotta Films’ Blu-ray/DVD OUT 1 Box Set,
originally scheduled for release on November 24, 2015,
will now become available on January 12, 2016 

New Street Date: January 12, 2016  

NEW YORK, NY – OCTOBER 26, 2015 – Kino Lorber and Carlotta Films US announce that the Blu-ray/DVD release of Jacques Rivette’s OUT 1, originally set to street on November 24, 2015, will now become available on January 12, 2016. The SRP is $99.95.

As previously announced, this release of OUT 1 is presented in a new 2k restoration supervised and approved by director of photography Pierre-William Glenn, and includes both the original 8-part series (Noli Me Tangere) alongside the shorter theatrical cut (Spectre), in a 13-disc, dual format (Blu-ray/DVD) special collector’s edition box set.

Special features include a new 120-page booklet, “OUT 1 and its Double” (bilingual English/French) featuring a new essay by film scholar and Jacques Rivette specialist Jonathan Rosenbaum, illustrated by numerous archival photographs and original stills by photographer Pierre Zucca, and a new full-length documentary, The Mysteries of Paris: Jacques Rivette’s OUT 1 Revisited (2015, 105 minutes), directed by Robert Fischer and Wilfried Reichart that includes interviews with the cast and crew and revisits some of the film’s most significant locations.

 

OUT 1 (13-disc Blu-ray/DVD Box Set)
Director: Jacques Rivette
Street Date: January 12, 2016
SRP: $99.95
UPC: 7 38329 20158 6

Technical Specs
6 BD * Mastered in High Definition * 1080/23.98p * AVC French 1.0 PCM * English Subtitles 1.37:1 Original Aspect Ratio * Color + B&W Total Running Time (Noli me tangere): 760 Minutes Running Time (Spectre): 255 Minutes

7 DVD * Mastered in High Definition * NTSC * MPEG-2 French 1.0 Dolby Digital * English Subtitles 1.33:1 Original Aspect Ratio * 4:3 * Color + B&W Total Running Time (Noli me tangere): 760 Minutes Running Time (Spectre): 255 Minutes

Special Features: 
New Full-Length Documentary – The Mysteries of Paris: Jacques Rivettes’s “Out 1″ Revisited
directed by Robert Fischer and Wilfried Reichart  (2015/Color/105 minutes)
Forty-five years after Out 1 was made, documentary filmmakers Robert Fischer and Wilfried Reichart interviewed cast and crew members and revisited some of the film’s most significant locations. The Mysteries of Paris features new contributions from actors Bulle Ogier, Michael Lonsdale and Hermine Karagheuz, cinematographer Pierre-William Glenn, assistant director Jean-François Stévenin and producer Stéphane Tchal Gadjieff, rare archival interviews with actors Jacques Doniol-Valcroze and Michel Delahaye and, most prominently, illuminating statements by director Jacques Rivette himself.

An Exclusive 120-page Booklet: “OUT 1 and its Double” (Bilingual English/French)
Featuring a new essay by Jonathan Rosenbaum (film scholar and Jacques Rivette specialist)
Illustrated by numerous archives and original stills by photographer Pierre Zucca
About Carlotta Films:
As an independent company, CARLOTTA FILMS has been promoting heritage cinema in France for 18 years: re-releasing restored classic films, cult films from the 70s & 80s, and also working specifically with young audiences.

Since its creation, CARLOTTA FILMS has steadily developed and supported every technological evolution, and released or re-released heritage films, using every medium: theatrical distribution, festivals attendance, DVD and Blu-ray editions, its own VoD platform (www.carlottavod.com), VoD distribution on major platforms, and more recently also an International Sales Section specialized in Independent Heritage Film.

With its work on Cinema History, the discovery of new horizons and new audience, CARLOTTA FILMS has decided to create its own company in the US, CARLOTTA FILMS US, in order to develop, with the same spirit as in France, an active distribution, specialized in revivals, with releases in theaters, as well as on DVD, Blu-ray, VoD, and TV in North America.

CARLOTTA FILMS US wishes to position itself in a complementary way as the already-existing independent American companies, who are doing a great job on Cinema History (both in theaters and DVD/Blu-ray). To do an important work on independent revivals and more especially, but not only, French films, especially from the ’70s, ’80s and ’90s, and to work on all media, starting with theatrical releases, festivals, then DVD/Blu-ray/VoD and TV.

And to create, from one side of the Atlantic to the other, bridges — links about Cinema History between France and America, with similar, different and new audiences.
About Kino Lorber:
With a library of 1,000 titles, Kino Lorber Inc. has been a leader in independent art house distribution for over 30 years, releasing over 25 films per year theatrically under its Kino Lorber, Kino Classics, and Alive Mind Cinema banners, including five Academy Award® nominated films in the last seven years. In addition, the company brings over 70 titles each year to the home entertainment market with DVD and Blu-ray releases under its five house brands, distributes a growing number of third party labels, and is a direct digital distributor to all major platforms including iTunes, Netflix, HULU, Amazon, Vimeo, Fandor and others.

 

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