Movie City Indie Archive for October, 2014

The Late George Sluizer on THE VANISHING (2013, 1’50”)

A Compendium Of Conversations With Laura Poitras And Edward Snowden About CITIZENFOUR

Edward Snowden introduces CITIZENFOUR at Leipzig Doc.

Laura Poitras: “I began documenting something in an observational way and then got pulled into the history that I was documenting. That certainly happened when I was put on a watch list by the U.S. government and began to be detained at borders. But it wasn’t just because I was put on a watch list that I was interested in surveillance. Over the course of my films, I’ve shifted from thinking that the pendulum swung in one direction after 9/11 and would swing back, to being less naive about the choices that were made. Surveillance is one of the ways the national-security state expanded after 9/11. I always thought that, after doing the Guantanamo film, I wanted to do something to bring the story home, and surveillance is set in the U.S. But it seemed like a tough theme to approach in a documentary because it’s hidden.” Conor Friedersdorf talks to Laura Poitras

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Laura Poitras’ Post-CITIZENFOUR Columbia, MO Q&A (32’19”)

Does this matter? This matters.

WIRED On The Science Of Interstellar (3’38”)

Red-Band Trailering THE GAMBLER Remake

Trailering Laura Poitras’ CITIZENFOUR (1’27”)

Chilling. Thrilling? Debuts tonight at NYFF.

Movie City Indie

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“Don’t work with assholes. Ever. No matter what they’re offering, no matter what they bring to the table. If they’re the sort of person where the phone rings at 10 o’clock at night and you wince because you see that it’s them, then don’t do business with them. One asshole will ruin your life. I’ve managed my entire TV and filmmaking career to work with people I like and respect. If the point comes where I don’t like or respect someone, I don’t work with them anymore.”

– Anthony Bourdain

The Atlantic: You saw that the Academy Awards recently held up your 2001 acceptance speech as the Platonic ideal of an Oscar speech. Did you have a reaction?

Soderbergh: Shock and dismay. When that popped up and people started texting me about it, I said, “Oh, it’s too bad I’m not there to tell the story of how that took place.” Well. I was not sober at the time. And I had nothing prepared because I knew I wasn’t going to win [Best Director for Traffic]. I figured Ridley, Ang or Daldry would win. So I was hitting the bar pretty hard, having a great night, feeling super-relaxed because I don’t have to get up there. So the combination of a 0.4 blood alcohol level and lack of preparation resulted in me, in my state of drunkenness crossed with adrenaline surge. I was coherent enough to know that [if I tried to thank everyone], that way lies destruction. So I went the other way. There were some people who appreciated that, and there were some people who really wanted to hear their names said, and I had to apologize to them.
~ Steven Soderbergh