Movie City Indie Archive for October, 2013

Jamie Stuart’s NYFF51 (11’56”)

Lou Reed Honda Scooter Ad (0’29”)

“Street Hassle,” Lou Reed (11’00”)

“Love has gone away
and there’s no one here now
And there’s nothing left to say
but oh how I miss him, baby
Ah baby, come on and slip away
come on baby, why don’t you slip away…”

“Satellite Of Love,” Lou Reed (4’32”)

“O Delmore how I miss you. You inspired me to write. You were the greatest man I ever met. You could capture the deepest emotions in the simplest language. Your titles were more than enough to raise the muse of fire on my neck. You were a genius. Doomed.

I loved your wit and massive knowledge.

You were and have always been the one.

You can lead a horse to water but you can’t make him think.

I wanted to write. One line as good as yours. My mountain. My inspiration.

You wrote the greatest short story ever written.
In Dreams.”

O Delmore how I miss you,” Lou Reed.

A First Image From Mike Leigh’s JMW Turner Biopic

First Image - Mike Leigh's Untitled 13

He sees the sea.

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Bella Freud’s PUNK: GIRL BOILS EGG (3’03”)

SHOWstudio: Punk: Girls Boil Eggs – Bella Freud from SHOWstudio on Vimeo.

“Concept & Direction: Bella Freud; Cinematography: Seamus McGarvey BSC, ASC; Performance: Gala Gordon and Alice Costelloe; Styling: Bella Freud; Hair: Jose Quijano; Make-up: Ciara O’ Shea; Edit: Charlie Moreton; Fashion: Bella Freud; Soundtrack: Bodies by the Sex Pistols; Production: Black Dog Films”

Trailering Jehane Noujaim’s THE SQUARE (2’33”)

16 Frames From Orson Welles’ TOO MUCH JOHNSON (3’01”)

Previewing Cormac McCarthy’s Screenplay Of “The Counselor” (spoiler-ish)

The paperback of Cormac McCarthy’s “The Counselor” will be released a few days before the film arrives in theaters. Amazon’s “Look Inside The Book” is uncommonly generous with swatches of the early pages of the screenplay.

Screen Shot 2013-10-12 at 2.47.49 PM Read the full article »

Trailering AMERICAN HUSTLE

RIP Patrice Chéreau: “Dans la solitude…”

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The Value Of Bresson (So Sez Amazon)

The Value Of Bresson

Movie City Indie

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“I had this friend who was my roommate for a while. She seemed really normal in every way except that she wouldn’t buy shampoo. She would only use my shampoo. And after a year it’s like, “When are you going to buy your own shampoo?” It was her way of digging in her heels. It was a certain sense of entitlement, or a certain anger. It was so interesting to me why she wouldn’t buy her own fucking shampoo. It was like,“I’m gonna use yours.” It was coming from a place of “You have more money than me, I just know it”—whether I did or I didn’t. Or maybe she felt, “You have a better life than me,” or “You have a better room than me in the apartment.” It was hostile. And she was a really close friend! There was never any other shampoo and I knew she was washing her hair. And clearly I have a thing about shampoo, as we see in ‘Friends with Money.’ I had some nice shampoo. So I found that psychologically so interesting how a person can function normally in every way and yet have this aberrance—it’s like a skip in the record. It was a sense of entitlement, I think. I put that in Olivia’s character, too, with her stealing someone’s face cream.”
Nicole Holofcener

“When books become a thing, they can no longer be fine.

“Literary people get mad at Knausgård the same way they get mad at Jonathan Franzen, a writer who, if I’m being honest, might be fine. I’m rarely honest about Jonathan Franzen. He’s an extremely annoying manI have only read bits and pieces of his novels, and while I’ve stopped reading many novels even though they were pretty good or great, I have always stopped reading Jonathan Franzen’s novels because I thought they were aggressively boring and dumb and smug. But why do I think this? I didn’t read him when he was a new interesting writer who wrote a couple of weird books and then hit it big with ‘The Corrections,’ a moment in which I might have picked him up with curiosity and read with an open mind; I only noticed him once, after David Foster Wallace had died, he became the heir apparent for the Great American Novelist position, once he had had that thing with Oprah and started giving interviews in which he said all manner of dumb shit; I only noticed him well after I had been told he was An Important Writer.

“So I can’t and shouldn’t pretend that I am unmoved by the lazily-satisfied gentle arrogance he projects or when he is given license to project it by the has-the-whole-world-gone-crazy development of him being constantly crowned and re-crowned as Is He The Great American Writer. What I really object to is this, and if there’s anything to his writing beyond it, I can’t see it and can’t be bothered. Others read him and tell me he’s actually a good writer—people whose critical instincts I have learned to respect—so I feel sure that he’s probably a perfectly fine, that his books are fine, and that probably even his stupid goddamned bird essays are probably also fine.

“But it’s too late. He has become a thing; he can’t be fine.”
~ Aaron Bady