Movie City Indie Archive for October, 2013

Jamie Stuart’s NYFF51 (11’56”)

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Lou Reed Honda Scooter Ad (0’29”)

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“Street Hassle,” Lou Reed (11’00”)

“Love has gone away
and there’s no one here now
And there’s nothing left to say
but oh how I miss him, baby
Ah baby, come on and slip away
come on baby, why don’t you slip away…”

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“Satellite Of Love,” Lou Reed (4’32”)

“O Delmore how I miss you. You inspired me to write. You were the greatest man I ever met. You could capture the deepest emotions in the simplest language. Your titles were more than enough to raise the muse of fire on my neck. You were a genius. Doomed.

I loved your wit and massive knowledge.

You were and have always been the one.

You can lead a horse to water but you can’t make him think.

I wanted to write. One line as good as yours. My mountain. My inspiration.

You wrote the greatest short story ever written.
In Dreams.”

O Delmore how I miss you,” Lou Reed.

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A First Image From Mike Leigh’s JMW Turner Biopic

First Image - Mike Leigh's Untitled 13

He sees the sea.

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Bella Freud’s PUNK: GIRL BOILS EGG (3’03”)

SHOWstudio: Punk: Girls Boil Eggs – Bella Freud from SHOWstudio on Vimeo.

“Concept & Direction: Bella Freud; Cinematography: Seamus McGarvey BSC, ASC; Performance: Gala Gordon and Alice Costelloe; Styling: Bella Freud; Hair: Jose Quijano; Make-up: Ciara O’ Shea; Edit: Charlie Moreton; Fashion: Bella Freud; Soundtrack: Bodies by the Sex Pistols; Production: Black Dog Films”

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Trailering Jehane Noujaim’s THE SQUARE (2’33”)

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Previewing Cormac McCarthy’s Screenplay Of “The Counselor” (spoiler-ish)

The paperback of Cormac McCarthy’s “The Counselor” will be released a few days before the film arrives in theaters. Amazon’s “Look Inside The Book” is uncommonly generous with swatches of the early pages of the screenplay.

Screen Shot 2013-10-12 at 2.47.49 PM Read the full article »

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Trailering AMERICAN HUSTLE

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RIP Patrice Chéreau: “Dans la solitude…”

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The Value Of Bresson (So Sez Amazon)

The Value Of Bresson

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Movie City Indie

Quote Unquotesee all »

“I was 15 when I first watched Sally Hardesty escape into the back of a pickup truck, covered in blood and cackling like a goddamn witch. All of her friends were dead. She had been kidnapped, tortured and even forced to feed her own blood to her cannibalistic captors’ impossibly shriveled patriarch. Being new to the horror genre, I was sure she was going to die. It had been a few months since I survived a violent sexual assault, where I subsequently ran from my assailant, tripped, fell and fought like hell. I crawled home with bloody knees, makeup-stained cheeks and a new void in both my mind and heart. My sense of safety, my ability to trust others, my willingness to form new relationships and my love of spending time with people I cared about were all taken from me. It wasn’t until I found the original The Texas Chain Saw Massacre that something clicked. It was Sally’s strength, and her resilience. It was watching her survive blows to the head from a hammer. It was watching her break free from her bonds and burst through a glass window. It was watching her get back up after she’d been stabbed. It was watching her crawl into the back of a truck, laughing as it drove away from Leatherface. She was the last one to confront the killer, and live. I remember sitting in front of the TV and thinking, There I am. That’s me.”
~ Lauren Milici On “The Final Girl”

“‘Thriller’ enforced its own reality principle; it was there, part of the every commute, a serenade to every errand, a referent to every purchase, a fact of every life. You didn’t have to like it, you only had to acknowledge it. By July 6, 1984, when the Jacksons played the first show of their ‘Victory’ tour, in Kansas City, Missouri, Jacksonism had produced a system of commodification so complete that whatever and whoever was admitted to it instantly became a new commodity. People were no longer comsuming commodities as such things are conventionally understood (records, videos, posters, books, magazines, key rings, earrings necklaces pins buttons wigs voice-altering devices Pepsis t-shirts underwear hats scarves gloves jackets – and why were there no jeans called Bille Jeans?); they were consuming their own gestures of consumption. That is, they were consuming not a Tayloristic Michael Jackson, or any licensed facsimile, but themselves. Riding a Mobius strip of pure capitalism, that was the transubstantiation.”
~ Greil Marcus On Michael Jackson