Movie City Indie Archive for September, 2013

Godard Featured in Trailer For “LA ROCHE SUR YON 2013″ Festival (1’04”)

[Via David Hudson.]

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Spielberg interviewed on Japanese TV (1982) (1″57’32”)

[Via @thesheik1976.]

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Shirin Neshat’s Viennale Trailer, With Natalie Portman (2’11”)

And shot by Darius Khondji.

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RIP Michel Brault: LA LUTTE (24″01″) Wrestling Doc

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Trailering BLUE IS THE WARMEST COLOR (1’44”)

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Pride’s Friday 5, 20 September 2013

1. Prisoners

PRISONERS

2. After Tiller
(NYC)

“As shot in a monochrome palette by the great Roger Deakins (Skyfall, so many Coen brothers films), the rain brings its own grey-blue gloom to the pallid faces fearful for the fate of the two children. It’s doomy and luscious, and a wondrous example of what a gifted director of photography can do with today’s digital capture instead of shooting on film. Menacing, heavy rain. A world of overcast, a world of pain. The images say more than words. A world with no escape. “There was a gas station in the background, with mercury vapor lights,” Deakins says in the press kit of the technical means. “The police cars have blue flashing lights, and you don’t want to overpower them, so you tend to work wide and open. We were basically shooting the action with the high-powered flashlights in the hands of the actors so we could get a decent beam and a good, hot image out of them.” This kind of immediacy, and low-light luminosity, suffuses Prisoners.” [More here.]

 2. After Tiller
(NYC)

Read the full article »

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Red-Band Trailering CONCUSSION (2’03”)

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AIN’T THEM BODIES SAINTS Making-Of By The Ross Brothers (13’29”)

Still sturdy stuff.

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TIFF13’s 12 YEARS A SLAVE Press Conference (43’54”)

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Miyazaki Retirement Press Conference (6’26”)

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TIFF’s Opening Night Tribute To Roger Ebert (3’56”)

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Movie City Indie

Quote Unquotesee all »

What are we doing wrong?
“Well, first of all, by “we” I assume you mean the public, the public approach or the public discourse, which means the discourse that takes place in the media. And for the purposes of this discussion, let us imagine that the media is white and thus approaches the topic of race as if they (the white people) were the answer and them (the black people) were the question. And so, in the interest of fairness, they take their turn (having first, of course, given it to themselves) and then invite comment by some different white people and some similar black people. They give what purports to be simply their point of view and then everyone else gives their beside-the-point of view.

“The customary way for white people to think about the topic of race—and it is only a topic to white people—is to ask, How would it be if I were black? But you can’t separate the “I” from being white. The “I” is so informed by the experience of being white that it is its very creation—it is this “I” in this context that is, in fact, the white man’s burden. People who think of themselves as well intentioned—which is, let’s face it, how people think of themselves—believe that the best, most compassionate, most American way to understand another person is to walk a mile in their shoes. And I think that’s conventionally the way this thing is approached. And that’s why the conversation never gets anywhere and that’s why the answers always come back wrong and the situation stays static—and worse than static.”
~ Fran Lebowitz, 1997

“If one could examine his DNA, it would read ACTOR. He embraced every role with fire and fierce dedication. Playing Bela Lugosi in Tim Burton’s Ed Wood was his loving tribute to all actors and garnered him a well-deserved Academy Award. His work was his joy and his legacy.”
~ Barbara Bain On Martin Landau