Movie City Indie Archive for April, 2013

On Collaboration: Leigh Whannel & James Wan

“The writer and director of the original SAW and 2011’s INSIDIOUS talk about how they collaborate Chicago, Park Hyatt Hotel, 8 March 2011.”

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Tribeca FF’s “Film & Content Distribution Panel” (55’58”)

Joshua Topolsky of The Verge moderated Tribeca’s April 22 Future of Film Live series panel “The Big Picture: Film Distribution Today” with Richard Wellerstein (AT&T U-Verse), Mike Imbesi (Comcast), Avner Ronen (Boxee) and Kristin Jones (Vuguru).

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“State of Cinema: Steven Soderbergh” (39’35”)

After successful viral increments, Mr. Soderbergh has allowed the “archival” recording of his speech to be published on the SF Film Society blog, along with a rush transcript: “A few months ago I was on this Jet Blue coming from New York to Burbank, and I like Jet Blue not because of the prices, but they have this terminal at JFK that’s really nice. I think it may be the nicest terminal in the country although I have to say of this country, if you want to see some great airports you have to go to a major city in another part of the world—they have amazing, amazing airports, they’re incredible and they’re quiet. You’re not being assaulted by music all the time. I don’t know when it was decided that we all need a soundtrack everywhere we go. I was just in the bathroom upstairs and there was a soundtrack, accompanying me at the urinal, I don’t understand Anyways, I’m getting comfortable in my seat—I spent the extra 60 bucks for the legroom so we’re hitting altitude and I’m getting a little comfortable—and there’s this guy who is in the other side of the aisle in front of me and he pulls out his iPad; he’s about to start watching stuff. I’m curious as to what he’s going to watch. He’s a white guy in his mid-30s and what he’s done is he’s loaded in half-a-dozen, sort of, “action extravaganzas” and he’s watching each of the action sequences. He’s skipping over all the dialogue and the narrative. So this guy’s flight is just going to be five-and-a-half hours of mayhem…” [Transcript continues here.]

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Todd Wagner Talks Future Of Film At Tribeca FF (55’33”)

A conversation with Todd Wagner, co-owner of 2929 Entertainment, which owns Landmark Theaters, Magnolia Pictures, and HDNet Films. Recorded before a live audience on April 25, 2013 at the Tribeca Film Festival.

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Steven Spielberg’s “Obama” (1’57”)

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Teasing Wong Kar-wai’s THE GRANDMASTER (1’10”)

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Trailering DIRTY WARS (2’20”)

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Trailering THE BLING RING (1’24”)

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Noam Chomsky On How To Talk To Women (1’28”)

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RIP Jonathan Winters (6’02”)

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Movie City Indie

Quote Unquotesee all »

“Let me try and be as direct as I possibly can with you on this. There was no relationship to repair. I didn’t intend for Harvey to buy and release The Immigrant – I thought it was a terrible idea. And I didn’t think he would want the film, and I didn’t think he would like the film. He bought the film without me knowing! He bought it from the equity people who raised the money for me in the States. And I told them it was a terrible idea, but I had no say over the matter. So they sold it to him without my say-so, and with me thinking it was a terrible idea. I was completely correct, but I couldn’t do anything about it. It was not my preference, it was not my choice, I did not want that to happen, I have no relationship with Harvey. So, it’s not like I repaired some relationship, then he screwed me again, and I’m an idiot for trusting him twice! Like I say, you try to distance yourself as much as possible from the immediate response to a movie. With The Immigrant I had final cut. So he knew he couldn’t make me change it. But he applied all the pressure he could, including shelving the film.”
James Gray

“I’m an unusual producer because I control the destiny of a lot of the films I’ve done. Most of them are in perfect states of restoration and preservation and distribution, and I aim to keep them in distribution. HanWay Films, which is my sales company, has a 500-film catalogue, which is looked after and tended like a garden. I’m still looking after my films in the catalogue and trying to get other people to look after their films, which we represent intellectually, to try to keep them alive. A film has to be run through a projector to be alive, unfortunately, and those electric shadows are few and far between now. It’s very hard to go and see films in a movie house. I was always involved with the sales and marketing of my films, right up from The Shout onwards. I’ve had good periods, but I also had a best period because the film business was in its best period then. You couldn’t make The Last Emperor today. You couldn’t make The Sheltering Sky today. You couldn’t make those films anymore as independent films. There are neither the resources nor the vision within the studios to go to them and say, “I want to make a film about China with no stars in it.”Then, twenty years ago, I thought, “OK, I’m going to sell my own films but I don’t want to make it my own sales company.” I wanted it to be for me but I wanted to make it open for every other producer, so they don’t feel that they make a film but I get the focus. So, it’s a company that is my business and I’m involved with running it in a certain way, but I’m not seen as a competitor with other people that use it. It’s used by lots of different producers apart from me. When I want to use it, however, it’s there for me and I suppose I’m planning to continue making all my films to be sold by HanWay. I don’t have to, but I do because it’s in my building and the marketing’s here, and I can do it like that. Often, it sounds like I’m being easy about things, but it’s much more difficult than it sounds. It’s just that I’ve been at it for a long time and there’s lots of fat and security around my business. I know how to make films, but it’s not easy—it’s become a very exacting life.”
~ Producer Jeremy Thomas