Movie City Indie Archive for April, 2013

On Collaboration: Leigh Whannel & James Wan

“The writer and director of the original SAW and 2011’s INSIDIOUS talk about how they collaborate Chicago, Park Hyatt Hotel, 8 March 2011.”

Tribeca FF’s “Film & Content Distribution Panel” (55’58”)

Joshua Topolsky of The Verge moderated Tribeca’s April 22 Future of Film Live series panel “The Big Picture: Film Distribution Today” with Richard Wellerstein (AT&T U-Verse), Mike Imbesi (Comcast), Avner Ronen (Boxee) and Kristin Jones (Vuguru).

“State of Cinema: Steven Soderbergh” (39’35”)

After successful viral increments, Mr. Soderbergh has allowed the “archival” recording of his speech to be published on the SF Film Society blog, along with a rush transcript: “A few months ago I was on this Jet Blue coming from New York to Burbank, and I like Jet Blue not because of the prices, but they have this terminal at JFK that’s really nice. I think it may be the nicest terminal in the country although I have to say of this country, if you want to see some great airports you have to go to a major city in another part of the world—they have amazing, amazing airports, they’re incredible and they’re quiet. You’re not being assaulted by music all the time. I don’t know when it was decided that we all need a soundtrack everywhere we go. I was just in the bathroom upstairs and there was a soundtrack, accompanying me at the urinal, I don’t understand Anyways, I’m getting comfortable in my seat—I spent the extra 60 bucks for the legroom so we’re hitting altitude and I’m getting a little comfortable—and there’s this guy who is in the other side of the aisle in front of me and he pulls out his iPad; he’s about to start watching stuff. I’m curious as to what he’s going to watch. He’s a white guy in his mid-30s and what he’s done is he’s loaded in half-a-dozen, sort of, “action extravaganzas” and he’s watching each of the action sequences. He’s skipping over all the dialogue and the narrative. So this guy’s flight is just going to be five-and-a-half hours of mayhem…” [Transcript continues here.]

Todd Wagner Talks Future Of Film At Tribeca FF (55’33”)

A conversation with Todd Wagner, co-owner of 2929 Entertainment, which owns Landmark Theaters, Magnolia Pictures, and HDNet Films. Recorded before a live audience on April 25, 2013 at the Tribeca Film Festival.

Steven Spielberg’s “Obama” (1’57”)

David Gordon Green On Getting Your Film Out There (2’38”)

Teasing Wong Kar-wai’s THE GRANDMASTER (1’10”)

Trailering DIRTY WARS (2’20”)

Trailering THE BLING RING (1’24”)

Tilda Swinton’s Ebertfest 2013 “Dance-along” (2’03”)

Noam Chomsky On How To Talk To Women (1’28”)

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RIP Jonathan Winters (6’02”)

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A. O. Scott, Herzog On Ebert On “Charlie Rose” (19’25”)

Movie City Indie

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“What Quibi trying to do is get to the next generation of film narrative. The first generation was movies, and they were principally two-hour stories that were designed to be watched in a single sitting in a movie theater [ED: After formats like the nickelodeon]. The next generation of film narrative was television, principally designed to be watched in one-hour chapters in front of a television set. I believe the third generation of film narrative will be a merging of those two ideas, which is to tell two-hour stories in chapters that are seven to ten minutes in length. We are actually doing long-form in bite-size.”
~ Jeffrey Katzenberg

“The important thing is: what makes the audience interested in it? Of course, I don’t take on any roles that don’t interest me, or where I can’t find anything for myself in it. But I don’t like talking about that. If you go into a restaurant and you have been served an exquisite meal, you don’t need to know how the chef felt, or when he chose the vegetables on the market. I always feel a little like I would pull the rug out from under myself if I were to I speak about the background of my work. My explanations would come into conflict with the reason a movie is made in the first place — for the experience of the audience — and that, I would not want.
~  Christoph Waltz