Movie City Indie Archive for February, 2013

Trailering FINDING VIVIAN MEIER (2’39”)


Joe Carnahan on Creative Control (5’32”)

Red Band-Teasing Danny Boyle’s TRANCE (1’27”)

Teasing Kyoshi Kurosawa’s REAL (0’32”)

“American Possibility: The Cinema of Hal Hartley” (3’46” intro)

As the Canadian Film Institute’s Tom McSorley writes as a February-March retrospective is announced, “Hartley’s work combines the best of American-style exuberance and intelligence with broader artistic influences from Europe and Asia. His work has been favourably compared to the films of Hollywood comedic master, Preston Sturges, to the searching and formally inventive films of French New Wave legend, Jean-Luc Godard, to the kinetic, balletic solemnity of Buster Keaton movies.”

Trailering THE MASTER in Russia with new footage (1’05”)

See All 5 Oscar-Nominated Animated Shorts Online (At Least Until Oscar)

And the nominees arePaperman, Adam and Dog, Fresh Guacamole, Head Over Heels, Maggie Simpson In: The Longest Daycare.

Read the full article »

Teasing FRANCES HA (0’21”)

Opening May 17.
Read the full article »

David Lynch’s IDEM PARIS (7’47”)

1 Comment »

Trailering Dror Moreh’s Masterpiece, THE GATEKEEPERS (2’00”)

Picturing Von Trier’s NYMPH()MANIAC

[Nordisk.]

Quvenzhané Wallis In ΤΑ ΜΥΘΙΚΑ ΠΛΑΣΜΑΤΑ ΤΟΥ ΝΟΤΟΥ

Or, as Hushpuppy puts it in Greek, «Τα νερά θα ανέβουν, τα άγρια ζώα θα εγερθούν από τους τάφους, κι ό,τι βρίσκεται νότια της αποβάθρας θα βυθιστεί, σε αυτή την ιστορία της εξάχρονης Χάσπαπι, που ζει με το μπαμπά της στην άκρη του κόσμου.»

[Via.]

Picturing David Gordon Green’s JOE

From David Gordon Green’s “gritty” Southern drama Joe, with Nicolas Cage and Tye Sheridan (Mud, Tree of Life), selling at the Berlinale EFM. “Joe is written by Gary Hawkins based on the Larry Brown novel, and produced by Green, his longtime producer Lisa Muskat, and Worldview CEO Christopher Woodrow, alongside Derrick Tseng.

“In the dirty unruly world of smalltown Texas, ex-convict Joe Ransom (Cage) has tried to put his dark past behind him and to live a simple life. He works for a lumber company by day, drinks by night. But when 15-year-old Gary (Sheridan)—a kid trying to support his family—comes to town, desperate for work, Joe has found a way to atone for his sins—to finally be someone’s hero. As Joe tries to protect Gary, the pair will take the twisting road to redemption in the hope for a better life in this tough, hard-hitting but incredibly moving story.”

Movie City Indie

Quote Unquotesee all »

“Ten years ago at Telluride, I said on a panel that theatrical distribution was dying. It seemed obvious to me. I was surprised how many in the audience violently objected: ‘People will always want to go to the movies!’ That’s true, but it’s also true that theatrical cinema as we once knew it has died. Theatrical cinema is now Event Cinema, just as theatrical plays and musical performances are Events. No one just goes to a movie. It’s a planned occasion. Four types of Event Cinema remain.
1. Spectacle (IMAX-style blockbusters)
2. Family (cartoon like features)
3. Horror (teen-driven), and
4. Film Club (formerly arthouse but now anything serious).

There are isolated pockets like black cinema, romcom, girl’s-night-out, seniors, teen gross-outs, but it’s primarily those four. Everything else is TV. Now I have to go back to episode five of ‘Looming Tower.'”
~ Paul Schrader

“Because of my relative candor on Twitter regarding why I quit my day job, my DMs have overflowed with similar stories from colleagues around the globe. These peeks behind the curtains of film festivals, venues, distributors and funding bodies weren’t pretty. Certain dismal patterns recurred (and resonated): Boards who don’t engage with or even understand their organization’s artistic mission and are insensitive to the diverse neighborhood in which their organization’s venue is located; incompetent founders and/or presidents who create only obstacles, never solutions; unduly empowered, Trumpian bean counters who chip away at the taste and experiences that make organizations’ cultural offerings special; expensive PR teams that don’t bring to the table a bare-minimum familiarity with the rich subcultural art form they’re half-heartedly peddling as “product”; nonprofit arts organizations for whom art now ranks as a distant-second goal behind profit.”
~ Eric Allen Hatch