Movie City Indie Archive for February, 2013

“Bad Lip Reading” Goes Indie Spirit (2’06”)

I can imagine Tilda Swinton saying that.

Annapurna Pictures Raises A Beautiful, Declarative, Grandiloquent Middle Finger

Annapurna Pictures cuts together a brief, taut sizzle reel from its first productions, LawlessThe MasterThe GrandmasterKilling Them Softly, Zero Dark ThirtySpring Breakers, and does the litany of lines from them not sound like a bold declaration of intent? In part: “‘I’m bad news, I’m not your friend…’ ‘I knew y’all was special, it’s written on your faces…’ ‘Let’s cause some trouble now…’ ‘Don’ you ever touch me agin…’ ‘I just want to make something clear, there is nobody else, there’s just us…’  ‘Everybody’s miserable here, they just see the same things…’ ‘If we are not helping him, then it is we who have failed him…’ ‘Don’ make me laugh, I’m livin’ in America and in America you’re on your own.'” And to add one more: “Ye shall know them by their fruits.”


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Cinetic’s John Sloss On Oscar On Bloomberg (4’06”)

9 Best Drinks: RAISE ONE TO THE BEST PICTURE NOMINEES

The drinks menu at my fifth Academy Award-coinciding party (Cleo’s, 1935 W. Chicago Ave., Chicago)

A Trailer For An Issue Of A Magazine Themed To Film With “Raymondo Winstonio” (1’08”)

PORT / Issue 9 / Spring 2013 / Preview from PORT on Vimeo.

Genially, this is the equivalent of Ray Winstone binding himself in a three-piece suit and declaiming the phone book.

The Césars’ “Hommage aux disparus”: Those Who Passed In French Cinema 2012 (4’15”)

Veuillez installer Flash Player pour lire la vidéo

VICE shorts: Spencer Susser’s “I Love Sarah Jane” with Mia Wasikowski (14’39”)

“When you’re young and in love the air seems clearer, the sun seems brighter, there’s a spring in the step… But all can so easily go to shit especially with a zombie apocalypse involved.”

Bruce Willis On Oscars For Action Or Comedy

[GQ, March 2013.]

Red-Band Trailering Harmony Korine’s SPRING BREAKERS (2’04”)

The looping, fugue-style fashion of the film comes across cleanly in the compacted form of a trailer, conveniently enough. That, plus that “m” word.

Stream Shane Carruth’s UPSTREAM COLOR score

Lena Dunham: “It’s funny to me…”

[Rolling Stone Issue 1177.]

Donald Richie on AU HASARD, BALTHASAR (4’37”)

[Via Criterion.]

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Movie City Indie

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“I had this friend who was my roommate for a while. She seemed really normal in every way except that she wouldn’t buy shampoo. She would only use my shampoo. And after a year it’s like, “When are you going to buy your own shampoo?” It was her way of digging in her heels. It was a certain sense of entitlement, or a certain anger. It was so interesting to me why she wouldn’t buy her own fucking shampoo. It was like,“I’m gonna use yours.” It was coming from a place of “You have more money than me, I just know it”—whether I did or I didn’t. Or maybe she felt, “You have a better life than me,” or “You have a better room than me in the apartment.” It was hostile. And she was a really close friend! There was never any other shampoo and I knew she was washing her hair. And clearly I have a thing about shampoo, as we see in ‘Friends with Money.’ I had some nice shampoo. So I found that psychologically so interesting how a person can function normally in every way and yet have this aberrance—it’s like a skip in the record. It was a sense of entitlement, I think. I put that in Olivia’s character, too, with her stealing someone’s face cream.”
Nicole Holofcener

“When books become a thing, they can no longer be fine.

“Literary people get mad at Knausgård the same way they get mad at Jonathan Franzen, a writer who, if I’m being honest, might be fine. I’m rarely honest about Jonathan Franzen. He’s an extremely annoying manI have only read bits and pieces of his novels, and while I’ve stopped reading many novels even though they were pretty good or great, I have always stopped reading Jonathan Franzen’s novels because I thought they were aggressively boring and dumb and smug. But why do I think this? I didn’t read him when he was a new interesting writer who wrote a couple of weird books and then hit it big with ‘The Corrections,’ a moment in which I might have picked him up with curiosity and read with an open mind; I only noticed him once, after David Foster Wallace had died, he became the heir apparent for the Great American Novelist position, once he had had that thing with Oprah and started giving interviews in which he said all manner of dumb shit; I only noticed him well after I had been told he was An Important Writer.

“So I can’t and shouldn’t pretend that I am unmoved by the lazily-satisfied gentle arrogance he projects or when he is given license to project it by the has-the-whole-world-gone-crazy development of him being constantly crowned and re-crowned as Is He The Great American Writer. What I really object to is this, and if there’s anything to his writing beyond it, I can’t see it and can’t be bothered. Others read him and tell me he’s actually a good writer—people whose critical instincts I have learned to respect—so I feel sure that he’s probably a perfectly fine, that his books are fine, and that probably even his stupid goddamned bird essays are probably also fine.

“But it’s too late. He has become a thing; he can’t be fine.”
~ Aaron Bady