Movie City Indie Archive for February, 2013

“Bad Lip Reading” Goes Indie Spirit (2’06”)

I can imagine Tilda Swinton saying that.

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Annapurna Pictures Raises A Beautiful, Declarative, Grandiloquent Middle Finger

Annapurna Pictures cuts together a brief, taut sizzle reel from its first productions, LawlessThe MasterThe GrandmasterKilling Them Softly, Zero Dark ThirtySpring Breakers, and does the litany of lines from them not sound like a bold declaration of intent? In part: “‘I’m bad news, I’m not your friend…’ ‘I knew y’all was special, it’s written on your faces…’ ‘Let’s cause some trouble now…’ ‘Don’ you ever touch me agin…’ ‘I just want to make something clear, there is nobody else, there’s just us…’  ‘Everybody’s miserable here, they just see the same things…’ ‘If we are not helping him, then it is we who have failed him…’ ‘Don’ make me laugh, I’m livin’ in America and in America you’re on your own.'” And to add one more: “Ye shall know them by their fruits.”


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Cinetic’s John Sloss On Oscar On Bloomberg (4’06”)

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9 Best Drinks: RAISE ONE TO THE BEST PICTURE NOMINEES

The drinks menu at my fifth Academy Award-coinciding party (Cleo’s, 1935 W. Chicago Ave., Chicago)

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A Trailer For An Issue Of A Magazine Themed To Film With “Raymondo Winstonio” (1’08”)

PORT / Issue 9 / Spring 2013 / Preview from PORT on Vimeo.

Genially, this is the equivalent of Ray Winstone binding himself in a three-piece suit and declaiming the phone book.

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The Césars’ “Hommage aux disparus”: Those Who Passed In French Cinema 2012 (4’15”)

Veuillez installer Flash Player pour lire la vidéo
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VICE shorts: Spencer Susser’s “I Love Sarah Jane” with Mia Wasikowski (14’39”)

“When you’re young and in love the air seems clearer, the sun seems brighter, there’s a spring in the step… But all can so easily go to shit especially with a zombie apocalypse involved.”

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Bruce Willis On Oscars For Action Or Comedy

[GQ, March 2013.]

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Red-Band Trailering Harmony Korine’s SPRING BREAKERS (2’04”)

The looping, fugue-style fashion of the film comes across cleanly in the compacted form of a trailer, conveniently enough. That, plus that “m” word.

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Stream Shane Carruth’s UPSTREAM COLOR score

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Lena Dunham: “It’s funny to me…”

[Rolling Stone Issue 1177.]

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Donald Richie on AU HASARD, BALTHASAR (4’37”)

[Via Criterion.]

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Movie City Indie

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“I was 15 when I first watched Sally Hardesty escape into the back of a pickup truck, covered in blood and cackling like a goddamn witch. All of her friends were dead. She had been kidnapped, tortured and even forced to feed her own blood to her cannibalistic captors’ impossibly shriveled patriarch. Being new to the horror genre, I was sure she was going to die. It had been a few months since I survived a violent sexual assault, where I subsequently ran from my assailant, tripped, fell and fought like hell. I crawled home with bloody knees, makeup-stained cheeks and a new void in both my mind and heart. My sense of safety, my ability to trust others, my willingness to form new relationships and my love of spending time with people I cared about were all taken from me. It wasn’t until I found the original The Texas Chain Saw Massacre that something clicked. It was Sally’s strength, and her resilience. It was watching her survive blows to the head from a hammer. It was watching her break free from her bonds and burst through a glass window. It was watching her get back up after she’d been stabbed. It was watching her crawl into the back of a truck, laughing as it drove away from Leatherface. She was the last one to confront the killer, and live. I remember sitting in front of the TV and thinking, There I am. That’s me.”
~ Lauren Milici On “The Final Girl”

“‘Thriller’ enforced its own reality principle; it was there, part of the every commute, a serenade to every errand, a referent to every purchase, a fact of every life. You didn’t have to like it, you only had to acknowledge it. By July 6, 1984, when the Jacksons played the first show of their ‘Victory’ tour, in Kansas City, Missouri, Jacksonism had produced a system of commodification so complete that whatever and whoever was admitted to it instantly became a new commodity. People were no longer comsuming commodities as such things are conventionally understood (records, videos, posters, books, magazines, key rings, earrings necklaces pins buttons wigs voice-altering devices Pepsis t-shirts underwear hats scarves gloves jackets – and why were there no jeans called Bille Jeans?); they were consuming their own gestures of consumption. That is, they were consuming not a Tayloristic Michael Jackson, or any licensed facsimile, but themselves. Riding a Mobius strip of pure capitalism, that was the transubstantiation.”
~ Greil Marcus On Michael Jackson