Movie City Indie Archive for November, 2012

Trailering “Girls: Season 2″ (1’51”)

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Deep Inside James Lipton (3’08”)


[Via VF.]

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THR’s “The Directors: Full Uncensored Interview” With Lee, Russell, Hooper, Van Sant, Affleck, QT (1″01’02”)

Let’s just sample some Quen-teen: “When I’m writing, it’s about the page. It’s not about the movie. It’s about the literature of me putting my pen to paper and writing a good page, and making it work completely. Now it’s mine to fuck up if I go forward with it I always go forward with it. But I want to love that script so much that I’m tempted to stop. There’s stuff that’s in the script that I know will never ever make the movie, but it just makes the book—the piece of literature—better. It’s a better read. It’s more emotionally satisfying. Then just like you do with an adaptation, you peel a lot of that stuff away.”

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Sundance13: Teasing Shane Carruth’s UPSTREAM COLOR

[Via.]

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In Italy, LOOPER Takes Place In Torronah

[Click twice for largest.]

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“Durch die Nacht”: James Ellroy And Bruce Wagner Prowl L. A. (52’04”)

[Via Edward Champion.]

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Slanging With James Ellroy (13’52”)

LA Review Of Books’ Tom Lutz talks to James Ellroy in Victor’s Deli about his new e-novella, “Shakedown,” and the true-life character of Fred Otash, scandal monger and shakedown artist.

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Trailering Wong Kar-wai’s THE GRANDMASTERS (2’45”, subs)

<iframe width=”651″ height=”366″ src=”http://www.youtube.com/embed/XKWXnNfAXfM?rel=0″ frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen></iframe>

[Translated by Andrew Chan for Film Comment.]

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Movie City Indie

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“We’ve talked about this before in the past, my obsession with the Shakespearean histories having the ideal combination of the sweet and the sour. In ‘Henry IV, Part II’ which we’ve discussed before, in the end of that story it’s very complex and haunting because Prince Hal becomes Henry the King, and he has transcended his hoodlum days and at the ceremony is Falstaff, his good friend with whom he has really fucked around and been a loser with, and Falstaff comes up to him and says, ‘Now that you’re king we can really party,’ and the king famously says, ‘I know thee not, old man.’ It becomes Henry IV’s anointment and Falstaff’s catastrophe. That’s life. I have experienced very little unfettered triumph. There are moments, such as when my children are born, but even that comes with new fears and anxieties. In a sense the better you can communicate that life is both at once, the more powerful over time something becomes. One strives for something where the threads are there because it lasts in way that is very palpable. The idea of a tragedy is powerful in literature and theater, but in cinema it doesn’t work, certainly not commercially, and less so critically. Why is that? I think it has to do with how movies are so close to us.”
~ James Gray

 

“Hollywood executives can rattle off the rules for getting a movie approved by Chinese censors: no sex (too unseemly); no ghosts (too spiritual). Among 10 prohibited plot elements are “disrupts the social order” and “jeopardizes social morality.” Time travel is frowned upon because of its premise that individuals can change history. U.S. filmmakers sometimes anticipate Chinese censors and alter movies before their release. The Oscar-winning alien-invasion drama “Arrival” was edited to make a Chinese general appear less antagonistic before the film’s debut in China this year. For “Passengers,” the space adventure starring Chris Pratt and Jennifer Lawrence, a scene showing Mr. Pratt’s bare backside was removed, and a scene of Mr. Pratt chatting in Mandarin with a robot bartender was added.”
~ “Hollywood’s New Script”