Movie City Indie Archive for October, 2012

Joe Sabia Walks 3 Miles In Darkened Downtown In NYC (8’15”)


[Via Boingboing.]

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“Darth Vader… Now That You’re Part Of The Disney Family…” (1’08”)


(With no small thanks to John Williams.)

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Picturing “PIXAR Wars” (by Andrew Chesworth)

 

[Via. Click twice for largest.]

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Humor From Michael Moore: “A Message From The Greatest Generation” (NSFW, 2’20”)


As credited: “Produced by Michael Moore with Daron Murphy & David Ambrose of ART NOT WAR. Written by Michael Moore & Jonathan Schwarz. Directed by Laura Dawn.”

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Paul Thomas Anderson On Australia APP: THE MASTER, Penises And Carly Rae Jepsen (7’51” audio)

[Via Cigarettes and Red Vines.]

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“Midtraffik: We Will Drive You” (1’28”)

Take this bus. (via @cameroncollie)

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“Lena Dunham: Your First Time” (1’03”)

A sense of aggravation and grievance has been registered on the internet.

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Run, Lana, Run: Lana Wachowski’s HRC Visibility Award Acceptance Speech (31’09”)

The complete transcript is here. About public life vs. anonymity: “Several months ago we were sitting in this Berlin club amid beer soaked haggardness in a space not intended to be inhabited by people and sunlight trying to decide if we should shoot this introduction to a trailer for our movie that was supposed to be posted online. Tom Hanks was supposed to do it but became unavailable, Andy and I have not done press or made a public appearance including premieres in over 12 years. People have mistakenly assumed that this has something to do with my gender. It does not. After The Matrix was released in ‘99, we both experienced this alarming contraction of our world and thus our lives. We became acutely aware of the preciousness of anonymity—understanding it as a form of virginity, something you only lose once. Anonymity allows you access to civic space, to a form of participation in public life, to an egalitarian invisibility that neither of us wanted to give up. We told Warner Bros. that neither one of us wanted to do press anymore. They told us, “No. Absolutely not. This is non-negotiable. Directors are essential to selling and marketing a movie.” We said, “OK, we get it. So if it’s a choice between making movies or not doing press, we decided we’re not going to not make movies.” They said, “Hang on. Maybe there’s a little room for negotiation.” So this position in that negotiation was being examined in Berlin three months ago. All of us are conscious of the fact that not only will it be Andy and my first public appearance in a long time, but it will also be the first time that I speak publicly since my transition. Parenthetically this is a word that has very complicated subject for me because of its complicity in a binary gender narrative that I am not particularly comfortable with. Yet I realize the moment I go on camera, that act will be subject to projections that are both personal and political…” [Much more from the admitted “talker” on the video and at the link.]

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Trailering Shane Black’s IRON MAN 3

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Movie City Indie

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“I’m an ardent consumer of Fassbinder. Years ago, when I heard that he was a big admirer of Douglas Sirk, I went straight to the source — to the buffet Fassbinder dined out on — and found that there was plenty more. And what palettes! I love the look of Fassbinder movies. Some of them are also hideous in a way that’s really exciting. When you go to Sirk, it’s more standardized. The movies produced by Ross Hunter — those really lush, Technicolor ones. I know Sirk was a painter and considered himself a painter first for a long time. He really knew how to work his palettes and worked closely with whatever art director he had. I was a guest speaker for the Technicolor series at TIFF Bell Lightbox and we screened Magnificent Obsession. To prepare for that, I watched the movie with a pen and paper. I wroteto down the names of the palettes. Soon, I realized those general color terms weren’t good enough. I used to be a house painter and I remembered the great names of the 10,000 different colors you could get in a paint chip book. So, I started to try to name the colors. Sirk used 100 different off-whites, especially in the surgery scenes in Magnificent Obsession!”
~ Guy Maddin On Sirk And Fassbinder

“I’ve never been lumped in with other female directors. If anything, I’ve been compared way too much to male filmmakers whom I have little to nothing in common with except visual style. It’s true that women’s filmmaking is incredibly diverse, but I am personally interested in how female consciousness might shape artwork differently, especially in the way female characters are constructed. So I actually would encourage people to try to group women’s films together to see if there are any threads that connect them, and to try to create a sort of canon of women’s films that critics can talk about as women’s films. One reason I want to be thought of as a female filmmaker is that my work can only be understood in that context. So many critics want to see my work as a pastiche of films that men have created. When they do that, they deny the fact that I am creating my own world, something completely original. Women are so often thought of as being unable to make meaning. So they are allowed to copy what men make—to make a pastiche out of what men have created—but not to create original work. My work comes from a place of being female, and rewrites film genres from that place. So it’s essential for me to be placed into a history of female-feminist art-making practice, otherwise it’s taking the work completely out of context.”
~ Love Witch Writer-Designer-Director Anna Biller