Movie City Indie Archive for October, 2012

Joe Sabia Walks 3 Miles In Darkened Downtown In NYC (8’15″)


[Via Boingboing.]

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“Darth Vader… Now That You’re Part Of The Disney Family…” (1’08″)


(With no small thanks to John Williams.)

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Picturing “PIXAR Wars” (by Andrew Chesworth)

 

[Via. Click twice for largest.]

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Humor From Michael Moore: “A Message From The Greatest Generation” (NSFW, 2’20″)


As credited: “Produced by Michael Moore with Daron Murphy & David Ambrose of ART NOT WAR. Written by Michael Moore & Jonathan Schwarz. Directed by Laura Dawn.”

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Paul Thomas Anderson On Australia APP: THE MASTER, Penises And Carly Rae Jepsen (7’51″ audio)

[Via Cigarettes and Red Vines.]

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“Midtraffik: We Will Drive You” (1’28″)

Take this bus. (via @cameroncollie)

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“Lena Dunham: Your First Time” (1’03″)

A sense of aggravation and grievance has been registered on the internet.

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Run, Lana, Run: Lana Wachowski’s HRC Visibility Award Acceptance Speech (31’09″)

The complete transcript is here. About public life vs. anonymity: “Several months ago we were sitting in this Berlin club amid beer soaked haggardness in a space not intended to be inhabited by people and sunlight trying to decide if we should shoot this introduction to a trailer for our movie that was supposed to be posted online. Tom Hanks was supposed to do it but became unavailable, Andy and I have not done press or made a public appearance including premieres in over 12 years. People have mistakenly assumed that this has something to do with my gender. It does not. After The Matrix was released in ‘99, we both experienced this alarming contraction of our world and thus our lives. We became acutely aware of the preciousness of anonymity—understanding it as a form of virginity, something you only lose once. Anonymity allows you access to civic space, to a form of participation in public life, to an egalitarian invisibility that neither of us wanted to give up. We told Warner Bros. that neither one of us wanted to do press anymore. They told us, “No. Absolutely not. This is non-negotiable. Directors are essential to selling and marketing a movie.” We said, “OK, we get it. So if it’s a choice between making movies or not doing press, we decided we’re not going to not make movies.” They said, “Hang on. Maybe there’s a little room for negotiation.” So this position in that negotiation was being examined in Berlin three months ago. All of us are conscious of the fact that not only will it be Andy and my first public appearance in a long time, but it will also be the first time that I speak publicly since my transition. Parenthetically this is a word that has very complicated subject for me because of its complicity in a binary gender narrative that I am not particularly comfortable with. Yet I realize the moment I go on camera, that act will be subject to projections that are both personal and political…” [Much more from the admitted "talker" on the video and at the link.]

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Trailering Shane Black’s IRON MAN 3

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Movie City Indie

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A statement from David Chase’s representative, Leslee Dart:

A journalist for Vox misconstrued what David Chase said in their interview. To simply quote David as saying,“ Tony Soprano is not dead,” is inaccurate. There is a much larger context for that statement and as such, it is not true. As David Chase has said numerous times on the record, “Whether Tony Soprano is alive or dead is not the point.” To continue to search for this answer is fruitless. The final scene of THE SOPRANOS raises a spiritual question that has no right or wrong answer.
~ David Chase Refutes Vox Writer

“By the time the sounds of the Von Trapp children warbling ‘Silent Night’ drift through The Giver, you may find yourself wondering what fresh movie hell this is. In truth, the enervating hash of dystopian dread, vague religiosity and commercial advertising-style uplift is nothing if not stale. Adapted from Lois Lowry’s book for young readers, the story involves an isolated society that, with its cubistic dwellings, mindless smiles, monochromatic environs and nebulous communitarianism, seem modeled on a Scandinavian country or an old Mentos commercial.”
~ Manohla Dargis’ Deadly Lede For Review Of The Giver