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Movie City Indie Archive for September, 2012

“How The James Bond Theme Was Born” (3’43”)

Wall Street Journal journos can be yakkers, too!

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MNSFW: THE MASTER: “Last One/Thank You” (4’33”)

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Backstage with Western Costume (2’44”)

The MPAA’s “The Creditsvisits the 100-year-old Hollywood mainstay.
Directed by Austin Saya, DP: Stewart Yost, Music: Geoffrey Yandle

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TV-Spotting THIS IS 40 (0’31”)

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Cinema Scope’s Denizens Roundtable TIFF12 (46’55”)

Avec Jason Anderson, Robert Koehler, Adam Nayman, Mark Peranson, Kiva Reardon and John Semley.

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BERGMAN’S VIDEO, A Documentary About Ingmar’s Collection (with González Iñárritu, Alfredson)

The videos start on autoplay; you should stop all three then watch one at a time.

From SVT. If you’re in Sweden, there’s hours of extracts and outtakes to be seen. Below, Alejandro González Iñárritu prowls Bergman’s video room and Faroe (“If film is religion, then this is Mecca, or the Vatican.”), then Tomas Alfredson.
Read the full article »

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Wouldn’t You Know A “West Wing” Reunion Would Be A Political Ad? (4’04”)

I”m Bridget Mary McCormack, and I approve this message…”  Here’s how it happened: “Trying to get your campaign video to go viral? How about getting the cast of the “West Wing” to reunite? It worked for Bridget Mary McCormack, a candidate for Michigan’s State Supreme Court. The four-minute video starsMartin SheenBradley WhitfordAllison Janney and six other familiar faces from the beloved, long-running series explaining the less-than-scintillating dynamics of non-partisan ballots — with a sweet plug for the first-time candidate thrown in for good measure…” [More at the link.]

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Trailering Al Maysles’ Iris Apfel Project (5’10”)

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Ed Lachman Sez You Can’t Shoot Everything And Create Story Later (1’29”)


Another outtake from Side By Side.

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Movie City Indie

Quote Unquotesee all »

“People react primarily to direct experience and not to abstractions; it is very rare to find anyone who can become emotionally involved with an abstraction. The longer the bomb is around without anything happening, the better the job that people do in psychologically denying its existence. It has become as abstract as the fact that we are all going to die someday, which we usually do an excellent job of denying. For this reason, most people have very little interest in nuclear war. It has become even less interesting as a problem than, say, city government, and the longer a nuclear event is postponed, the greater becomes the illusion that we are constantly building up security, like interest at the bank. As time goes on, the danger increases, I believe, because the thing becomes more and more remote in people’s minds. No one can predict the panic that suddenly arises when all the lights go out — that indefinable something that can make a leader abandon his carefully laid plans. A lot of effort has gone into trying to imagine possible nuclear accidents and to protect against them. But whether the human imagination is really capable of encompassing all the subtle permutations and psychological variants of these possibilities, I doubt. The nuclear strategists who make up all those war scenarios are never as inventive as reality, and political and military leaders are never as sophisticated as they think they are.”
~ Stanley Kubrick

“You can’t make films about something the audience knows nothing about. The trick is getting the audience to tell their own stories in the story so that they know what will happen. And then, just before they get bored, you must surprise them and move the story in a new direction.”
~ Mogens Rukov

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