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Movie City Indie Archive for September, 2012

“How The James Bond Theme Was Born” (3’43″)

Wall Street Journal journos can be yakkers, too!

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MNSFW: THE MASTER: “Last One/Thank You” (4’33″)

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Backstage with Western Costume (2’44″)

The MPAA’s “The Creditsvisits the 100-year-old Hollywood mainstay.
Directed by Austin Saya, DP: Stewart Yost, Music: Geoffrey Yandle

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TV-Spotting THIS IS 40 (0’31″)

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Cinema Scope’s Denizens Roundtable TIFF12 (46’55″)

Avec Jason Anderson, Robert Koehler, Adam Nayman, Mark Peranson, Kiva Reardon and John Semley.

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BERGMAN’S VIDEO, A Documentary About Ingmar’s Collection (with González Iñárritu, Alfredson)

The videos start on autoplay; you should stop all three then watch one at a time.

From SVT. If you’re in Sweden, there’s hours of extracts and outtakes to be seen. Below, Alejandro González Iñárritu prowls Bergman’s video room and Faroe (“If film is religion, then this is Mecca, or the Vatican.”), then Tomas Alfredson.
Read the full article »

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Wouldn’t You Know A “West Wing” Reunion Would Be A Political Ad? (4’04″)

I”m Bridget Mary McCormack, and I approve this message…”  Here’s how it happened: “Trying to get your campaign video to go viral? How about getting the cast of the “West Wing” to reunite? It worked for Bridget Mary McCormack, a candidate for Michigan’s State Supreme Court. The four-minute video starsMartin SheenBradley WhitfordAllison Janney and six other familiar faces from the beloved, long-running series explaining the less-than-scintillating dynamics of non-partisan ballots — with a sweet plug for the first-time candidate thrown in for good measure…” [More at the link.]

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Trailering Al Maysles’ Iris Apfel Project (5’10″)

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Ed Lachman Sez You Can’t Shoot Everything And Create Story Later (1’29″)


Another outtake from Side By Side.

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Movie City Indie

Quote Unquotesee all »

“Chad Harbach spent ten years writing his novel. It was his avocation, for which he was paid nothing, with no guarantee he’d ever be paid anything, while he supported himself doing freelance work, for which I don’t think he ever made $30,000 a year. I sold his book for an advance that equated to $65,000 a year—before taxes and commission—for each of the years of work he’d put in. The law schools in this country churn out first-year associates at white-shoe firms that pay them $250,000 a year, when they’re twenty-five years of age, to sit at a desk doing meaningless bullshit to grease the wheels of the corporatocracy, and people get upset about an excellent author getting $65,000 a year? Give me a fucking break.”
~ Book Agent Chris Parris-Lamb On The State Of The Publishing Industry

INTERVIEWER
Do you think this anxiety of yours has something to do with being a woman? Do you have to work harder than a male writer, just to create work that isn’t dismissed as being “for women”? Is there a difference between male and female writing?

FERRANTE
I’ll answer with my own story. As a girl—twelve, thirteen years old—I was absolutely certain that a good book had to have a man as its hero, and that depressed me. That phase ended after a couple of years. At fifteen I began to write stories about brave girls who were in serious trouble. But the idea remained—indeed, it grew stronger—that the greatest narrators were men and that one had to learn to narrate like them. I devoured books at that age, and there’s no getting around it, my models were masculine. So even when I wrote stories about girls, I wanted to give the heroine a wealth of experiences, a freedom, a determination that I tried to imitate from the great novels written by men. I didn’t want to write like Madame de La Fayette or Jane Austen or the Brontës—at the time I knew very little about contemporary literature—but like Defoe or Fielding or Flaubert or Tolstoy or Dostoyevsky or even Hugo. While the models offered by women novelists were few and seemed to me for the most part thin, those of male novelists were numerous and almost always dazzling. That phase lasted a long time, until I was in my early twenties, and it left profound effects.
~ Elena Ferrante, Paris Review Art Of Fiction No. 228

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