Movie City Indie Archive for September, 2012

“How The James Bond Theme Was Born” (3’43″)

Wall Street Journal journos can be yakkers, too!

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MNSFW: THE MASTER: “Last One/Thank You” (4’33″)

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Backstage with Western Costume (2’44″)

The MPAA’s “The Creditsvisits the 100-year-old Hollywood mainstay.
Directed by Austin Saya, DP: Stewart Yost, Music: Geoffrey Yandle

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TV-Spotting THIS IS 40 (0’31″)

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Cinema Scope’s Denizens Roundtable TIFF12 (46’55″)

Avec Jason Anderson, Robert Koehler, Adam Nayman, Mark Peranson, Kiva Reardon and John Semley.

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BERGMAN’S VIDEO, A Documentary About Ingmar’s Collection (with González Iñárritu, Alfredson)

The videos start on autoplay; you should stop all three then watch one at a time.

From SVT. If you’re in Sweden, there’s hours of extracts and outtakes to be seen. Below, Alejandro González Iñárritu prowls Bergman’s video room and Faroe (“If film is religion, then this is Mecca, or the Vatican.”), then Tomas Alfredson.
Read the full article »

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Wouldn’t You Know A “West Wing” Reunion Would Be A Political Ad? (4’04″)

I”m Bridget Mary McCormack, and I approve this message…”  Here’s how it happened: “Trying to get your campaign video to go viral? How about getting the cast of the “West Wing” to reunite? It worked for Bridget Mary McCormack, a candidate for Michigan’s State Supreme Court. The four-minute video starsMartin SheenBradley WhitfordAllison Janney and six other familiar faces from the beloved, long-running series explaining the less-than-scintillating dynamics of non-partisan ballots — with a sweet plug for the first-time candidate thrown in for good measure…” [More at the link.]

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Trailering Al Maysles’ Iris Apfel Project (5’10″)

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Ed Lachman Sez You Can’t Shoot Everything And Create Story Later (1’29″)


Another outtake from Side By Side.

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Movie City Indie

Quote Unquotesee all »

Julian Schnabel: Years ago, I was down there with my cousin’s wife Corky. She was wild — she wore makeup on her legs, and she had a streak in her hair like Yvonne De Carlo in “The Munsters.” She liked to paint. I had overalls on with just a T-shirt and looked like whatever. We were trying to buy a bunch of supplies with my cousin Jesse’s credit card. They looked at the credit card, and then they looked at us and thought maybe we stole the card, so they called Jesse up. He was a doctor who became the head of trauma at St. Vincent’s. They said, “There’s somebody here with this credit card and we want to know if it belongs to you.”

He said, “Well, does the woman have dyed blonde hair and fake eyelashes and look like she stepped out of the backstage of some kind of silent movie, and is she with some guy who has wild hair and is kind of dressed like a bum?”

“Yeah, that’s them.”

“Yeah, that’s my cousin and my wife. It’s okay, they can charge it on my card.”
~ Julian Schnabel Remembers NYC’s Now-Shuttered Pearl Paint

MB Cool. I was really interested in the aerial photography from Enter the Void and how one could understand that conceptually as a POV, while in fact it’s more of an objective view of the city where the story takes place. So it’s an objective and subjective camera at the same time. I know that you’re interested in Kubrick. We’ve talked about that in the past because it’s something that you and I have in common—

GN You’re obsessed with Kubrick, too.

MB Does he still occupy your mind or was he more of an early influence?

GN He was more of an early influence. Kubrick has been my idol my whole life, my own “god.” I was six or seven years old when I saw 2001: A Space Odyssey, and I never felt such cinematic ecstasy. Maybe that’s what brought me to direct movies, to try to compete with that “wizard of Oz” behind the film. So then, years later, I tried to do something in that direction, like many other directors tried to do their own, you know, homage or remake or parody or whatever of 2001. I don’t know if you ever had that movie in mind for your own projects. But in my case, I don’t think about 2001 anymore now. That film was my first “trip” ever. And then I tried my best to reproduce on screen what some drug trips are like. But it’s very hard. For sure, moving images are a better medium than words, but it’s still very far from the real experience. I read that Kubrick said about Lynch’s Eraserhead, that he wished he had made that movie because it was the film he had seen that came closest to the language of nightmares.

Matthew Barney and Gaspar Noé