Movie City Indie Archive for September, 2012

“How The James Bond Theme Was Born” (3’43”)

Wall Street Journal journos can be yakkers, too!

MNSFW: THE MASTER: “Last One/Thank You” (4’33”)

MediaBistro: “Spike Lee’s First Big Break” (5’58”)

Backstage with Western Costume (2’44”)

The MPAA’s “The Creditsvisits the 100-year-old Hollywood mainstay.
Directed by Austin Saya, DP: Stewart Yost, Music: Geoffrey Yandle

Billie Joe Armstrong Is Not “F—ing Justin Bieber, You Mother—-ers” (2’04”)

Nice meltdown.

TV-Spotting THIS IS 40 (0’31”)

Cinema Scope’s Denizens Roundtable TIFF12 (46’55”)

Avec Jason Anderson, Robert Koehler, Adam Nayman, Mark Peranson, Kiva Reardon and John Semley.

BERGMAN’S VIDEO, A Documentary About Ingmar’s Collection (with González Iñárritu, Alfredson)

The videos start on autoplay; you should stop all three then watch one at a time.

From SVT. If you’re in Sweden, there’s hours of extracts and outtakes to be seen. Below, Alejandro González Iñárritu prowls Bergman’s video room and Faroe (“If film is religion, then this is Mecca, or the Vatican.”), then Tomas Alfredson.
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Wouldn’t You Know A “West Wing” Reunion Would Be A Political Ad? (4’04”)

I”m Bridget Mary McCormack, and I approve this message…”  Here’s how it happened: “Trying to get your campaign video to go viral? How about getting the cast of the “West Wing” to reunite? It worked for Bridget Mary McCormack, a candidate for Michigan’s State Supreme Court. The four-minute video starsMartin SheenBradley WhitfordAllison Janney and six other familiar faces from the beloved, long-running series explaining the less-than-scintillating dynamics of non-partisan ballots — with a sweet plug for the first-time candidate thrown in for good measure…” [More at the link.]

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New MOONRISE KINGDOM Short: Bob Balaban Explains Bill Murray (1’39”)

Trailering Al Maysles’ Iris Apfel Project (5’10”)

Ed Lachman Sez You Can’t Shoot Everything And Create Story Later (1’29”)


Another outtake from Side By Side.

Movie City Indie

Quote Unquotesee all »

“BATTLE OF THE SEXES: Politics and queerness as spectacle/spectacle as politics and queerness. Pretty delightful, lovely, erotic. A-

“Not since EASY A and CABARET have I seen Emma Stone give a real sense of her range. Here, she has pathos and interiority and desire. I love the cinematography and the ways in which the images of the tennis icons are refracted and manipulated via various surfaces/mediators. Also, wild how a haircut is one of the most erotic scenes in cinema this year. Spine tinglingly tactile that feels refreshing. Proof that *cough* you don’t need to be ~graphic/explicit~ to be erotic *cough*. Also, it made me want to get into tennis. Watching it, at least.

“There are interesting touches and intimations as to the cinematic nature of sports, & unpacking the formal approach of broadcasting sports.Also, I was here for Sarah Silverman smoking. And also, hi Mickey Sumner!! It’s a really interesting film about the ways in which public spectacle is never apolitical, and how spectacle is prone to assignation.

“There’s this one other scene from BATTLE OF THE SEXES that I love, and it’s the one in the bar. You see Billie looking after Marilyn as she dances. Through a crowd. There’s a paradoxical closeness and distance between them. In the purple light, and the kitschy decor, everything is distorted. But Billie catches a glance and you can feel the nervous swell inside.”
~ Kyle Turner

“Our business is complicated because intimacy is part and parcel of our profession; as actors we are paid to do very intimate things in public. That’s why someone can have the audacity to invite you to their home or hotel and you show up. Precisely because of this we must stay vigilant and ensure that the professional intimacy is not abused. I hope we are in a pivotal moment where a sisterhood — and brotherhood of allies — is being formed in our industry. I hope we can form a community where a woman can speak up about abuse and not suffer another abuse by not being believed and instead being ridiculed. That’s why we don’t speak up — for fear of suffering twice, and for fear of being labeled and characterized by our moment of powerlessness. Though we may have endured powerlessness at the hands of Harvey Weinstein, by speaking up, speaking out and speaking together, we regain that power. And we hopefully ensure that this kind of rampant predatory behavior as an accepted feature of our industry dies here and now. Now that we are speaking, let us never shut up about this kind of thing. I speak up to make certain that this is not the kind of misconduct that deserves a second chance. I speak up to contribute to the end of the conspiracy of silence.”
Lupita Nyong’o