Movie City Indie Archive for June, 2012

ON HER MASH-UP’S SECRET SERVICE: Michael Fassbender is Christopher Nolan’s James Bond


So that’s why Fassbender’s been wearing all those scarves.

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“I’m Oliver Stone… And I’m A Savage” (1’20”)

Another eccentric bit of transmedia promoting Oliver Stone’s Savages, as yet unscreened for most reviewers.

Postering Mike Birbiglia’s SLEEPWALK WITH ME

Sam Smyth’s 30th Anniversary BLADE RUNNER Poster

 

[More here and here.]

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Co-Director Mark Andrews Talks BRAVE At Google (56’51”)

“Andrew Sarris: Critic In Focus”: A Late Interview (11’16”)

“Directed and Edited by Casimir Nozkowski; Cinematography by Pete Fonda; Original Music by Alexander Strung; Sound Mix by Tod Chapman.”

Josh Fox’s THE SKY IS PINK (18’34”)

From Fox’s follow-up to Gasland. Just the fracks, ma’am.

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David Lynch Loves To Paint (2’27”)

Absurd and Beautiful and PRADA and Oldman and Dafoe…

Vision asserted.  Photos by Steven Meisel. From the comments: “If a man showed up to pick me up for a date in some of these, I might propose to him right then.”

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Movie City Indie

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“What Quibi trying to do is get to the next generation of film narrative. The first generation was movies, and they were principally two-hour stories that were designed to be watched in a single sitting in a movie theater [ED: After formats like the nickelodeon]. The next generation of film narrative was television, principally designed to be watched in one-hour chapters in front of a television set. I believe the third generation of film narrative will be a merging of those two ideas, which is to tell two-hour stories in chapters that are seven to ten minutes in length. We are actually doing long-form in bite-size.”
~ Jeffrey Katzenberg

“The important thing is: what makes the audience interested in it? Of course, I don’t take on any roles that don’t interest me, or where I can’t find anything for myself in it. But I don’t like talking about that. If you go into a restaurant and you have been served an exquisite meal, you don’t need to know how the chef felt, or when he chose the vegetables on the market. I always feel a little like I would pull the rug out from under myself if I were to I speak about the background of my work. My explanations would come into conflict with the reason a movie is made in the first place — for the experience of the audience — and that, I would not want.
~  Christoph Waltz