Movie City Indie Archive for April, 2012

George Lucas Expands At The Milken Institute (43’03”)

Michael Milken and George Lucas do the celebrity panel thing together. Body language is not everything, but it’s a damn bonus.

This makes me cry. RIP Amos Vogel

Tender, true.

[Via Nellie Killian.]

“All Your Light (Times Like These)” by Portugal The Man (NSFW) (5’24”)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZonfGts68Y4

Shot by Michael Ragen, also cinematographer on Jack White’s “Sixteen Saltines” and Spiritualized’s “Hey Jane.” That’s one way to tell a story.

Postering IFC Midnight’s ROOM 237

YOU AIN’T SEEN NOTHING YET: Postering Resnais at 89

Cannes-bound.

SPIKE LEE: THE DOLLY SHOT (2’54”)

Wes Anderson for Clark’s Wallabees

[Via @KeithCalder.]

Trailering COSMOPOLIS

Postering Neil Jordan’s BYZANTIUM

[Via WestEnd Films’ Facebook.]

Welles On CITIZEN KANE and Gregg Toland DELETED

Trailering “Dogme 40: Donald Duck”

Crazy Icelanders.

David Lynch’s Amusingly Skeptical Interview With VICE (13’46”)

Click twice for largest image of the Sage Of Missoula.

[Below the fold, the “Crazy Clown Time” video.]

Movie City Indie

Quote Unquotesee all »

“What Quibi trying to do is get to the next generation of film narrative. The first generation was movies, and they were principally two-hour stories that were designed to be watched in a single sitting in a movie theater [ED: After formats like the nickelodeon]. The next generation of film narrative was television, principally designed to be watched in one-hour chapters in front of a television set. I believe the third generation of film narrative will be a merging of those two ideas, which is to tell two-hour stories in chapters that are seven to ten minutes in length. We are actually doing long-form in bite-size.”
~ Jeffrey Katzenberg

“The important thing is: what makes the audience interested in it? Of course, I don’t take on any roles that don’t interest me, or where I can’t find anything for myself in it. But I don’t like talking about that. If you go into a restaurant and you have been served an exquisite meal, you don’t need to know how the chef felt, or when he chose the vegetables on the market. I always feel a little like I would pull the rug out from under myself if I were to I speak about the background of my work. My explanations would come into conflict with the reason a movie is made in the first place — for the experience of the audience — and that, I would not want.
~  Christoph Waltz