Movie City Indie Archive for April, 2012

George Lucas Expands At The Milken Institute (43’03”)

Michael Milken and George Lucas do the celebrity panel thing together. Body language is not everything, but it’s a damn bonus.

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This makes me cry. RIP Amos Vogel

Tender, true.

[Via Nellie Killian.]

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“All Your Light (Times Like These)” by Portugal The Man (NSFW) (5’24”)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZonfGts68Y4

Shot by Michael Ragen, also cinematographer on Jack White’s “Sixteen Saltines” and Spiritualized’s “Hey Jane.” That’s one way to tell a story.

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Postering IFC Midnight’s ROOM 237

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YOU AIN’T SEEN NOTHING YET: Postering Resnais at 89

Cannes-bound.

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SPIKE LEE: THE DOLLY SHOT (2’54”)

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Wes Anderson for Clark’s Wallabees

[Via @KeithCalder.]

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Trailering COSMOPOLIS

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Postering Neil Jordan’s BYZANTIUM

[Via WestEnd Films’ Facebook.]

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Welles On CITIZEN KANE and Gregg Toland DELETED

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Trailering “Dogme 40: Donald Duck”

Crazy Icelanders.

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David Lynch’s Amusingly Skeptical Interview With VICE (13’46”)

Click twice for largest image of the Sage Of Missoula.

[Below the fold, the “Crazy Clown Time” video.]

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Movie City Indie

Quote Unquotesee all »

“There are critics who see their job as to be on the side of the artist, or in a state of imaginative sympathy or alliance with the artist. I think it’s important for a critic to be populist in the sense that we’re on the side of the public. I think one of the reasons is, frankly, capitalism. Whether you’re talking about restaurants or you’re talking about movies, you’re talking about large-scale commercial enterprises that are trying to sell themselves and market themselves and publicize themselves. A critic is, in a way, offering consumer advice. I think it’s very, very important in a time where everything is commercialized, commodified, and branded, where advertising is constantly bleeding into other forms of discourse, for there to be an independent voice kind of speaking to—and to some extent on behalf of—the public.”
~ A. O. Scott On One Role Of The Critic

“Every night, we’d sit and talk for a long, long time and talk about the process and I knew he was very, very intrigued about what could be happening. Then of course, one of the fascinating things he told me about was how he had readers who were reading for him that never knew it was Stanley Kubrick. So if he heard of a novel, he would send it out to people. I think he did it through newspaper ads at the time. And he would send it out to people and ask for a kind of synopsis or a critique of the novel. And he would read those. And it was done anonymously. But he said there were housewives and there were barristers and all sorts of people doing that. And I thought, yeah, that’s a really good way to open up the possibilities. Because otherwise, you’re randomly looking, walking through a bookstore or an airport. I said, “How many people are doing this?” It was about 30 people.”
~ George Miller’s Conversations With Kubrick