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Movie City Indie Archive for March, 2012

1984

[Via Annapurna Pictures.]

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1983 “HBO Feature Presentation” Intro (1’14″)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oF0Pw8tiJBA

Man, is that long. [Via @PanosCosmatos.]

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Shooting TOUCH OF EVIL’s Opening (in color)

PHOTO COURTESY AMPAS

Among 70,000 production stills from the Bison Archives, the Academy acquired eight color images of the shooting of the opening of Touch of Evil.

ADDED 3/30: A map of the locations in Venice Beach.

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“The Writer’s Job Is To Get Naked”: RIP Harry Crews (9’41″)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xPswt7HKBQ8

And: “Stories was everything and everything was stories“: Harry Crews in Searching For The Wrong-Eyed Jesus.

And: the trailer for Survival Is Triumph Enough.

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“The Sound of The Hunger Games”

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Fred Astaire: HIPSTER

“Tequila!” ‘n shit.

[Via Brechtian]

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5 Images From Woody’s TO ROME WITH LOVE





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Trailering Xavier Dolan’s LAURENCE ANYWAYS (2’58″)

So that’s what Xavier Dolan‘s been up to… Not necessarily to be expected from the director of How I Killed My Mother and Les amours imaginaires, but… “C’est especial.”

“I didn’t see you coming this morning. Is this a revolt?”
“No sir, it’s a revolution.”

Cannes-bound, per David Hudson at Daily MUBI.

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Girl Talk’s “Girl Walk//All Day” Part 1 (of 12) (8’05″)

In 12 chapters, a runaway Kickstarter success. The site, here. “A 71-minute dance music video of epic proportions, set to the tune of Girl Talk’s All Day. The idea behind Girl Walk // All Day emerged from our desire to expand the boundaries around the idea of the traditional music video, which usually spans the length of a single track. This album-length piece will feature a talented group of dancers across a range of public and private spaces around New York City, turning the city’s sidewalks and obstacles into part of an evolving improvisational dance routine.”

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RIP Tonino Guerra (videos)

A trailer for a documentary in the making. Guerra looks so… calm. Centered. Down-to-earth. Nice.

I once had a random conversation with Guerra at a film festival about his poetry, which I had discovered only a couple weeks earlier. He seemed pleased to be able to talk about that writing more than about the many directors he’d written screenplays with, including Angelopoulos, smoking a cigarette and glaring at the other end of a couch. (The poetry is written in his native dialect and much of it is scabrous.)

Below, “Cooking Up Ideas” with Tarkovsky, from Voyage In Time.

Photo of Tarkovsky, Antonioni, Guerra: Letter To Jane.

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DVD Distrib Lets Customers Know The Fake DRAGON TATTOO DVD Markings Are… Real

“We would like to address some confusion caused by the DVD version of The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo. Upon opening the case, librarians and patrons will find what looks to be a burned DVD-R with the movie’s title scrawled across it with a marker…” (Preview copies of Monte Hellman’s Road To Nowhere used the same effect last year, aping the opening shot of the movie.) [Via BoingBoing.]

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Albert Brooks’ DRIVE monologue auf Deutsch (1’08″)

The polymath is multilingual!

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Doug Trumbull on 70mm Filmmaking (1’45″ vid)

Ever the romantic.

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Movie City Indie

Quote Unquotesee all »

“Chad Harbach spent ten years writing his novel. It was his avocation, for which he was paid nothing, with no guarantee he’d ever be paid anything, while he supported himself doing freelance work, for which I don’t think he ever made $30,000 a year. I sold his book for an advance that equated to $65,000 a year—before taxes and commission—for each of the years of work he’d put in. The law schools in this country churn out first-year associates at white-shoe firms that pay them $250,000 a year, when they’re twenty-five years of age, to sit at a desk doing meaningless bullshit to grease the wheels of the corporatocracy, and people get upset about an excellent author getting $65,000 a year? Give me a fucking break.”
~ Book Agent Chris Parris-Lamb On The State Of The Publishing Industry

INTERVIEWER
Do you think this anxiety of yours has something to do with being a woman? Do you have to work harder than a male writer, just to create work that isn’t dismissed as being “for women”? Is there a difference between male and female writing?

FERRANTE
I’ll answer with my own story. As a girl—twelve, thirteen years old—I was absolutely certain that a good book had to have a man as its hero, and that depressed me. That phase ended after a couple of years. At fifteen I began to write stories about brave girls who were in serious trouble. But the idea remained—indeed, it grew stronger—that the greatest narrators were men and that one had to learn to narrate like them. I devoured books at that age, and there’s no getting around it, my models were masculine. So even when I wrote stories about girls, I wanted to give the heroine a wealth of experiences, a freedom, a determination that I tried to imitate from the great novels written by men. I didn’t want to write like Madame de La Fayette or Jane Austen or the Brontës—at the time I knew very little about contemporary literature—but like Defoe or Fielding or Flaubert or Tolstoy or Dostoyevsky or even Hugo. While the models offered by women novelists were few and seemed to me for the most part thin, those of male novelists were numerous and almost always dazzling. That phase lasted a long time, until I was in my early twenties, and it left profound effects.
~ Elena Ferrante, Paris Review Art Of Fiction No. 228

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