Movie City Indie Archive for March, 2012

1984

[Via Annapurna Pictures.]

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1983 “HBO Feature Presentation” Intro (1’14”)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oF0Pw8tiJBA

Man, is that long. [Via @PanosCosmatos.]

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Shooting TOUCH OF EVIL’s Opening (in color)

PHOTO COURTESY AMPAS

Among 70,000 production stills from the Bison Archives, the Academy acquired eight color images of the shooting of the opening of Touch of Evil.

ADDED 3/30: A map of the locations in Venice Beach.

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“The Writer’s Job Is To Get Naked”: RIP Harry Crews (9’41”)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xPswt7HKBQ8

And: “Stories was everything and everything was stories“: Harry Crews in Searching For The Wrong-Eyed Jesus.

And: the trailer for Survival Is Triumph Enough.

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“The Sound of The Hunger Games”

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Fred Astaire: HIPSTER

“Tequila!” ‘n shit.

[Via Brechtian]

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5 Images From Woody’s TO ROME WITH LOVE





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Trailering Xavier Dolan’s LAURENCE ANYWAYS (2’58”)

So that’s what Xavier Dolan‘s been up to… Not necessarily to be expected from the director of How I Killed My Mother and Les amours imaginaires, but… “C’est especial.”

“I didn’t see you coming this morning. Is this a revolt?”
“No sir, it’s a revolution.”

Cannes-bound, per David Hudson at Daily MUBI.

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Girl Talk’s “Girl Walk//All Day” Part 1 (of 12) (8’05”)

In 12 chapters, a runaway Kickstarter success. The site, here. “A 71-minute dance music video of epic proportions, set to the tune of Girl Talk’s All Day. The idea behind Girl Walk // All Day emerged from our desire to expand the boundaries around the idea of the traditional music video, which usually spans the length of a single track. This album-length piece will feature a talented group of dancers across a range of public and private spaces around New York City, turning the city’s sidewalks and obstacles into part of an evolving improvisational dance routine.”

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RIP Tonino Guerra (videos)

A trailer for a documentary in the making. Guerra looks so… calm. Centered. Down-to-earth. Nice.

I once had a random conversation with Guerra at a film festival about his poetry, which I had discovered only a couple weeks earlier. He seemed pleased to be able to talk about that writing more than about the many directors he’d written screenplays with, including Angelopoulos, smoking a cigarette and glaring at the other end of a couch. (The poetry is written in his native dialect and much of it is scabrous.)

Below, “Cooking Up Ideas” with Tarkovsky, from Voyage In Time.

Photo of Tarkovsky, Antonioni, Guerra: Letter To Jane.

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DVD Distrib Lets Customers Know The Fake DRAGON TATTOO DVD Markings Are… Real

“We would like to address some confusion caused by the DVD version of The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo. Upon opening the case, librarians and patrons will find what looks to be a burned DVD-R with the movie’s title scrawled across it with a marker…” (Preview copies of Monte Hellman’s Road To Nowhere used the same effect last year, aping the opening shot of the movie.) [Via BoingBoing.]

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Albert Brooks’ DRIVE monologue auf Deutsch (1’08”)

The polymath is multilingual!

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Doug Trumbull on 70mm Filmmaking (1’45” vid)

Ever the romantic.

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Movie City Indie

Quote Unquotesee all »

“The worst thing that we have in today’s movie culture is Rotten Tomatoes. It’s the destruction of our business. I have such respect and admiration for film criticism. When I was growing up film criticism was a real art. And there was intellect that went into that. And you would read Pauline’s Kael’s reviews, or some others, and that doesn’t exist anymore. Now it’s about a number. A compounded number of how many positives vs. negatives. Now it’s about, ‘What’s your Rotten Tomatoes score?’ And that’s sad, because the Rotten Tomatoes score was so low on Batman v Superman I think it put a cloud over a movie that was incredibly successful. People don’t realize what goes into making a movie like that. It’s mind-blowing. It’s just insane, it’s hurting the business, it’s getting people to not see a movie. In Middle America it’s, ‘Oh, it’s a low Rotten Tomatoes score so I’m not going to go see it because it must suck.’ But that number is an aggregate and one that nobody can figure out exactly what it means, and it’s not always correct. I’ve seen some great movies with really abysmal Rotten Tomatoes scores. What’s sad is film criticism has disappeared. It’s really sad.”
~ Brett Ratner Has A Sad

“The loss of a local newspaper critic is a real loss. People who know the local audience and know the local cultural scene are very important resources. You can’t just substitute the stuff that comes in from nowhere through syndication or the wire. I think at the same time, some of the newer outlets have really beefed up and improved their coverage and made room for criticism. The real problem is in the more specialized art forms — fine arts, classical music, dance and jazz, say. There is a real slowing of critical voices, partly because those art forms have smaller audiences. Newspapers and magazines can say that doesn’t get enough traffic, so we don’t have room for that. To me, that’s especially worrisome. This is the opposite of what newspapers are supposed to do, which is not to try to figure out what people are already interested in and recite that back to them, but to hopefully guide them to something that they should be interested in, connecting potential audiences with more interesting work.

“Then again, not everyone needs a critic. People have been going to movies for more than 100 years now, and probably the vast majority of those people have not read movie reviews or cared what critics thought. But there has always been an important subset that wants to know more, that wants to think about what they’ve seen and what they’re going to see, and wants someone to think along with. I think critics are important, not just as dispensers of consumer advice — though that’s certainly part of it, too — but as trusted voices and companions for people to argue with in your head when you’re going to movies or afterwards.”
~ A. O. Scott