Movie City Indie Archive for November, 2011

Steve Jobs, On The World, In 45 Seconds

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Ken Russell’s Teenage Wasteland

PDF of a review of Mr. Russell’s 1950s teenpix here.

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KEN RUSSELL WAS 84

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Miley Cyrus Lavishes Up Some “Riot Porn”

Dubbed as such by @WilbotOsterman. Cyrus posted the video on her 19th birthday, according to the description here: “The video begins starkly with a message in white font on a black screen: ‘This is dedicated to the thousands of people who are standing up for what they believe in,’ and for the next three minutes comes a rapid-fire montage of scenes of sign-waving protesters and pepper-spraying police as Miley sings, ‘It’s a liberty walk, walk. Say goodbye to the people who tied you up… Free yourself, slam the door, not a prisoner anymore.'”

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Joan Didion: The White Album to Blue Nights (72m vid)

“In conversation with David L. Ulin, book critic, Los Angeles Times. A literary icon for Los Angeles and a cultural visionary for the rest of America, the acclaimed author of The White Album, The Year of Magical Thinking, and most recently, Blue Nights, discusses her current work and life in Los Angeles in the 60s. Part of ‘Pacific Standard Time: Art in LA 1945-1980′.”

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Hitler Disapproves Of A New Meme In Town: Pepper-Spray Cop

Hitler measures appropriate response and USES ALL-CAPS like a practiced commenter.

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Steve Jobs Brainstorms, In Classic LP VHS (21’17”)

An episode of “Entrpreneurs,” a portentously-written but useful glimpse of Jobs at work in the NeXT computer era. Below, Jobs demonstrates how “interpersonal computing” works. [Via TNW, where there are three more videos from that time.]

Read the full article »

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Andrea True Was 68: “More, More, More” (3’01”)

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“The Sound of The Muppets (9’02”)

“In this SoundWorks Collection exclusive we talk with Director James Bobin, Film Editor James Thomas, Supervising Sound Editors Kami Asgar and Sean McCormack, and Sound Re-recording Mixer Kevin O’Connell.”

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W.e.instein Trailering W.E. Anew

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Trailering RAMPART

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Time Code: UC Davis Pepper Spray Footage From 4 Perspectives

Brian DePalma, do you know Mike Figgis? Good. Meet Andy Baio.

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NYFF 49’s Béla Tarr Forum, in full (37’54”)

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Vid: “Raw Meat” for Black Lips with Leo Fitzpatrick

Cop imagery on the black-and-white streets of New York City?

“Directed by Phil Pinto, produced by Rachelyn Remz-Porter. Featuring Leo Fitzpatrick, Janell Shirtcliff, and Tennessee Thomas. ‘Raw Meat’ is from the album Arabia Mountain [Vice Records].”

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Movie City Indie

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“The worst thing that we have in today’s movie culture is Rotten Tomatoes. It’s the destruction of our business. I have such respect and admiration for film criticism. When I was growing up film criticism was a real art. And there was intellect that went into that. And you would read Pauline’s Kael’s reviews, or some others, and that doesn’t exist anymore. Now it’s about a number. A compounded number of how many positives vs. negatives. Now it’s about, ‘What’s your Rotten Tomatoes score?’ And that’s sad, because the Rotten Tomatoes score was so low on Batman v Superman I think it put a cloud over a movie that was incredibly successful. People don’t realize what goes into making a movie like that. It’s mind-blowing. It’s just insane, it’s hurting the business, it’s getting people to not see a movie. In Middle America it’s, ‘Oh, it’s a low Rotten Tomatoes score so I’m not going to go see it because it must suck.’ But that number is an aggregate and one that nobody can figure out exactly what it means, and it’s not always correct. I’ve seen some great movies with really abysmal Rotten Tomatoes scores. What’s sad is film criticism has disappeared. It’s really sad.”
~ Brett Ratner Has A Sad

“The loss of a local newspaper critic is a real loss. People who know the local audience and know the local cultural scene are very important resources. You can’t just substitute the stuff that comes in from nowhere through syndication or the wire. I think at the same time, some of the newer outlets have really beefed up and improved their coverage and made room for criticism. The real problem is in the more specialized art forms — fine arts, classical music, dance and jazz, say. There is a real slowing of critical voices, partly because those art forms have smaller audiences. Newspapers and magazines can say that doesn’t get enough traffic, so we don’t have room for that. To me, that’s especially worrisome. This is the opposite of what newspapers are supposed to do, which is not to try to figure out what people are already interested in and recite that back to them, but to hopefully guide them to something that they should be interested in, connecting potential audiences with more interesting work.

“Then again, not everyone needs a critic. People have been going to movies for more than 100 years now, and probably the vast majority of those people have not read movie reviews or cared what critics thought. But there has always been an important subset that wants to know more, that wants to think about what they’ve seen and what they’re going to see, and wants someone to think along with. I think critics are important, not just as dispensers of consumer advice — though that’s certainly part of it, too — but as trusted voices and companions for people to argue with in your head when you’re going to movies or afterwards.”
~ A. O. Scott