Movie City Indie Archive for November, 2011

Steve Jobs, On The World, In 45 Seconds

No Comments »

Ken Russell’s Teenage Wasteland

PDF of a review of Mr. Russell’s 1950s teenpix here.

No Comments »

KEN RUSSELL WAS 84

No Comments »

Miley Cyrus Lavishes Up Some “Riot Porn”

Dubbed as such by @WilbotOsterman. Cyrus posted the video on her 19th birthday, according to the description here: “The video begins starkly with a message in white font on a black screen: ‘This is dedicated to the thousands of people who are standing up for what they believe in,’ and for the next three minutes comes a rapid-fire montage of scenes of sign-waving protesters and pepper-spraying police as Miley sings, ‘It’s a liberty walk, walk. Say goodbye to the people who tied you up… Free yourself, slam the door, not a prisoner anymore.’”

1 Comment »

Joan Didion: The White Album to Blue Nights (72m vid)

“In conversation with David L. Ulin, book critic, Los Angeles Times. A literary icon for Los Angeles and a cultural visionary for the rest of America, the acclaimed author of The White Album, The Year of Magical Thinking, and most recently, Blue Nights, discusses her current work and life in Los Angeles in the 60s. Part of ‘Pacific Standard Time: Art in LA 1945-1980′.”

No Comments »

Hitler Disapproves Of A New Meme In Town: Pepper-Spray Cop

Hitler measures appropriate response and USES ALL-CAPS like a practiced commenter.

No Comments »

Steve Jobs Brainstorms, In Classic LP VHS (21’17″)

An episode of “Entrpreneurs,” a portentously-written but useful glimpse of Jobs at work in the NeXT computer era. Below, Jobs demonstrates how “interpersonal computing” works. [Via TNW, where there are three more videos from that time.]

Read the full article »

No Comments »

Andrea True Was 68: “More, More, More” (3’01″)

No Comments »

“The Sound of The Muppets (9’02″)

“In this SoundWorks Collection exclusive we talk with Director James Bobin, Film Editor James Thomas, Supervising Sound Editors Kami Asgar and Sean McCormack, and Sound Re-recording Mixer Kevin O’Connell.”

No Comments »

W.e.instein Trailering W.E. Anew

No Comments »

Trailering RAMPART

No Comments »

Time Code: UC Davis Pepper Spray Footage From 4 Perspectives

Brian DePalma, do you know Mike Figgis? Good. Meet Andy Baio.

No Comments »

NYFF 49′s Béla Tarr Forum, in full (37’54″)

No Comments »

Vid: “Raw Meat” for Black Lips with Leo Fitzpatrick

Cop imagery on the black-and-white streets of New York City?

“Directed by Phil Pinto, produced by Rachelyn Remz-Porter. Featuring Leo Fitzpatrick, Janell Shirtcliff, and Tennessee Thomas. ‘Raw Meat’ is from the album Arabia Mountain [Vice Records].”

No Comments »

Movie City Indie

Quote Unquotesee all »

“Yes, good movies sprout up, inevitably, in the cracks and seams between the tectonic plates on which all of these franchises stay balanced, and we are reassured of their hardiness. But we don’t see what we don’t see; we don’t see the effort, or the cost of the effort, or the movies of which we’re deprived because of the cost of the effort. Paul Thomas Anderson’s Inherent Vice may have come from a studio, but it still required a substantial chunk of outside financing, and at $35 million, it’s not even that expensive. No studio could find the $8.5 million it cost Dan Gilroy to make Nightcrawler. Birdman cost a mere $18 million and still had to scrape that together at the last minute. Imagine American movie culture for the last few years without Her or Foxcatcher or American Hustle or The Master or Zero Dark Thirty and it suddenly looks markedly more frail—and those movies exist only because of the fairy godmothership of independent producer Megan Ellison. The grace of billionaires is not a great business model on which to hang the hopes of an art form.”
~ Mark Harris On The State Of The Movies

How do you make a Top Ten list? For tax and organizational purposes, I keep a log of every movie I see (Title, year, director, exhibition format, and location the film was viewed in). Anything with an asterisk to the left of its title means it’s a 2014 release (or something I saw at a festival which is somehow in play for the year). If there’s a performance, or sequence, or line of dialogue, even, that strikes me in a certain way, I’ll make a note of it. So when year end consideration time (that is, the month and change out of the year where I feel valued) rolls around, it’s a little easier to go through and pull some contenders for categories. For 2014, I’m voting in three polls: Indiewire, SEFCA (my critics’ guild), and the Muriels. Since Indiewire was first, it required the most consternation. There were lots of films that I simply never had a chance to see, so I just went with my gut. SEFCA requires a lot of hemming and hawing and trying to be strategic, even though there’s none of the in-person skullduggery that I hear of from folk whose critics’ guild is all in the same city. The Muriels is the most fun to contribute to because it’s after the meat market phase of awards season. Also, because it’s at the beginning of next year, I’ll generally have been able to see everything I wanted to by then. I love making hierarchical lists, partially because they are so subjective and mercurial. Every critical proclamation is based on who you are at that moment and what experiences you’ve had up until that point. So they change, and that’s okay. It’s all a weird game of timing and emotional waveforms, and I’m sure a scientist could do an in-depth dissection of the process that leads to the discovery of shocking trends in collective evaluation. But I love the year end awards crush, because I feel somewhat respected and because I have a wild-and-wooly work schedule that has me bouncing around the city to screenings, or power viewing the screeners I get sent.
Jason Shawhan of Nashville Scene Answers CriticWire