Movie City Indie Archive for October, 2011

Gerhard Richter Talks Work, Life On Eve Of Tate Retrospective (22m)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P-hiBxnbjRI&feature=player_embedded

Cronenberg On Today’s Real-Life Video Nasties (cf. Gaddafi) 7’22” vid

Appropriately grisly images are shown. [From Newsnight, via “A Piece of Monologue.“]

Postering WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT KEVIN

Postering INTO THE ABYSS

Launch Vid: GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO H&M Fashions (60-sec)

Leonard Cohen’s “Prince Of Asturias Award” Speech

Goodness has everything to do with it. October 11, 2011: “It is a great honour to stand here before you tonight. Perhaps, like the great maestro, Riccardo Muti, I’m not used to standing in front of an audience without an orchestra behind me, but I will do my best as a solo artist tonight. I stayed up all night last night wondering what I might say to this assembly. After I had eaten all the chocolate bars and peanuts from the minibar, I scribbled a few words. I don’t think I have to refer to them. Obviously, I’m deeply touched to be recognized by the Foundation. But I have come here tonight to express another dimension of gratitude; I think I can do it in three or four minutes. When I was packing in Los Angeles, I had a sense of unease because I’ve always felt some ambiguity about an award for poetry. Poetry comes from a place that no one commands, that no one conquers. So I feel somewhat like a charlatan to accept an award for an activity which I do not command. In other words, if I knew where the good songs came from I would go there more often.

“I was compelled in the midst of that ordeal of packing to go and open my guitar. I have a Conde guitar, which was made in Spain in the great workshop at number 7 Gravina Street. I pick up an instrument I acquired over 40 years ago. I took it out of the case, I lifted it, and it seemed to be filled with helium it was so light. And I brought it to my face and I put my face close to the beautifully designed rosette, and I inhaled the fragrance of the living wood. We know that wood never dies. I inhaled the fragrance of the cedar as fresh as the first day that I acquired the guitar. And a voice seemed to say to me, “You are an old man and you have not said thank you, you have not brought your gratitude back to the soil from which this fragrance arose. And so I come here tonight to thank the soil and the soul of this land that has given me so much.

Because I know that just as an identity card is not a man, a credit rating is not a country.

Now, you know of my deep association and confraternity with the poet Frederico Garcia Lorca. Read the full article »

John Hawkes’ Music Video for MMMM’s “Marcy’s Song”

As written by the late Jackson C. Frank. His Wikipedia entry opens with a most bountiful paragraph: “When Jackson Frank was 11, a furnace exploded at his school, sending a ball of flames down corridors until it ended up in Frank’s music classroom in the Cleveland Hill Elementary School in Cheektowaga,  New York. The fire killed fifteen of his fellow students and burned Frank over more than half his body. It was during his time in the hospital that he was first introduced to playing music, when a teacher, Charlie Castelli, brought in an acoustic guitar to keep Frank occupied during his recovery. When he was 21, he was awarded an insurance check of $110,500 for his injuries, giving him enough to “catch a boat to England.”

2 Comments »

A Thunderstorm Gathers (10:42 timelapse)

Read the full article »

Fritz Lang and Billy Friedkin have a chat (1975) (49 min.)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rpKV1HqEdIs&feature=player_embedded

[H/t David Hudson.]

David Lynch Photographs His “Silencio” Nightclub: “Time gets funny at night.”

At Nowness, an interview with his photographs as well as an audio interview on growing up in the woods and his first cigarette. “The mood and feel that exists in the club comes from great lighting… You think of colors and shapes and the way the light plays off those things. The club has no windows, so once you’re inside, you could be anywhere, or nowhere.” Are you a nighttime person?
“No. Well, I am, but I don’t like to go out. I like to stay home. I like to work. I’m not a dancer. But I like the mood at night. Time gets funny at night.”

Framed: The Gaddafi Capture-Pistol-Whipping Video

Jarring, jagged, Ali Algadi’s iPhone footage is up in the late dictator’s face as he’s dragged to a truck to be taken away, apparently already wounded. The FPS of the footage jumps, nothing’s smooth, making distinct frames into individual, horrific compositions. GlobalPost describes: “In this exclusive footage obtained on the scene by Tracey Shelton of GlobalPost, Col. Muammar Gaddafi is caught by fighters for the new Libyan government. The shock discovery of the former dictator, found cowering in a water drain on Thursday in his hometown of Sirte, was captured by Ali Algadi, a rebel fighter, with an iPhone just seconds after Gaddafi was dragged from the drain in which he was hiding. This is the earliest footage to emerge so far. Although clearly injured, Gaddafi is still alive during the capture. His captors can be heard shouting, “Dont’ kill him! Don’t kill him! We need him alive!” throughout the footage. According to an official statement by the National Transitional Council, Gaddafi was shot before his capture and died from his wounds on route to Misrata.” Global Post’s video is here. Three frame captures are below. It looks like nothing less than a PETA video shot by Derek Jarman.

Read the full article »

3 Filmmakers, Chicago Int’l at 47: Swanberg, King, Naranjo

Joe Swa

At the just-ended 47th Chicago International Film Festival, I moderated public conversations with prolific Chicago filmmaker Joe Swanberg [above] and Braden King, director of HERE [below], as well as interviewing Gerardo Naranjo (Miss Bala), Wim Wenders and others.
Braden King
Naranjo

David Lynch’s In-Studio “Crazy Clown Time” Film (1’25”)

Mr. Lynch offers a track-by-track guide to his musical adventure.

TRACK-BY-TRACK:

“Pinky’s Dream”
“The horror and sadness of losing someone to other dimensions.”

“Good Day Today”
“About being sick of negativity.”

“So Glad”
“This kind of feeling comes up from time to time in our lives. It doesn’t always have to do with people…”

“Noah’s Ark”
“About being saved by love.”

Read the full article »

Movie City Indie

Quote Unquotesee all »

This is probably going to sound petty, but Martin Scorsese insisting that critics see his film in theaters even though it’s going straight to Netflix and then not screening it in most American cities was a watershed moment for me in this theatrical versus streaming debate.

I completely respect when a filmmaker insists that their movie is meant to be seen in the theater, but the thing is, you got to actually make it possible to see it in the theater. Some movies may be too small for that, and that’s totally OK.

When your movie is largely financed by a streaming service and is going to appear on that streaming service instantly, I don’t really see the point of pretending that it’s a theatrical film. It just seems like we are needlessly indulging some kind of personal fantasy.

I don’t think that making a feature film length production that is going to go straight to a video platform is some sort of “step down.“ I really don’t. Theatrical exhibition as we know it is dying off anyway, for a variety of reasons.

I should clarify myself because this thread is already being misconstrued — I’m talking about how the movie is screened in advance. If it’s going straight to Netflix, why the ritual of demanding people see it in the theater?

There used to be a category that everyone recognized called “TV movie” or “made for television movie” and even though a lot of filmmakers considered that déclassé, it seems to me that probably 90% of feature films fit that description now.

Atlantis has mostly sunk into the ocean, only a few tower spires remain above the waterline, and I’m increasingly at peace with that, because it seems to be what the industry and much of the audience wants. We live in an age of convenience and information control.

Only a very elite group of filmmakers is still allowed to make movies “for theaters“ and actually have them seen and judged that way on a wide scale. Even platform releasing seems to be somewhat endangered. It can’t be fought. It has to be accepted.

9. Addendum: I’ve been informed that it wasn’t Scorsese who requested that the Bob Dylan documentary only be screened for critics in theaters, but a Netflix representative indicated the opposite to me, so I just don’t know what to believe.

It’s actually OK if your film is not eligible for an Oscar — we have a thing called the Emmys. A lot of this anxiety is just a holdover from the days when television was considered culturally inferior to theatrical feature films. Everybody needs to just get over it.

In another 10 to 20 years they’re probably going to merge the Emmys in the Oscars into one program anyway, maybe they’ll call it the Contentys.

“One of the fun things about seeing the new Quentin Tarantino film three months early in Cannes (did I mention this?) is that I know exactly why it’s going to make some people furious, and thus I have time to steel myself for the takes.

Back in July 2017, when it was revealed that Tarantino’s next project was connected to the Manson Family murders, it was condemned in some quarters as an insulting and exploitative stunt. We usually require at least a fig-leaf of compassion for the victims in true-crime adaptations, and even Tarantino partisans like myself – I don’t think he’s made a bad film yet – found ourselves wondering how he might square his more outré stylistic impulses with the depiction of a real mass murder in which five people and one unborn child lost their lives.

After all, it’s one thing to slice off with gusto a fictional policeman’s ear; it’s quite another to linger over the gory details of a massacre that took place within living memory, and which still carries a dread historical significance.

In her essay The White Album, Joan Didion wrote: “Many people I know in Los Angeles believe that the Sixties ended abruptly on August 9, 1969, ended at the exact moment when word of the murders on Cielo Drive traveled like brushfire through the community, and in a sense this is true.”

Early in Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, as Leonardo DiCaprio and Brad Pitt’s characters drive up the hill towards Leo’s bachelor pad, the camera cranes up gently to reveal a street sign: Cielo Drive. Tarantino understands how charged that name is; he can hear the Molotov cocktails clinking as he shoulders the crate.

As you may have read in the reviews from Cannes, much of the film is taken up with following DiCaprio and Pitt’s characters – a fading TV actor and his long-serving stunt double – as they amusingly go about their lives in Los Angeles, while Margot Robbie’s Sharon Tate is a relatively minor presence. But the spectre of the murders is just over the horizon, and when the night of the 9th finally arrives, you feel the mood in the cinema shift.

No spoilers whatsoever about what transpires on screen. But in the audience, as it became clear how Tarantino was going to handle this extraordinarily loaded moment, the room soured and split, like a pan of cream left too long on the hob. I craned in, amazed, but felt the person beside me recoil in either dismay or disgust.

Two weeks on, I’m convinced that the scene is the boldest and most graphically violent of Tarantino’s career – I had to shield my eyes at one point, found myself involuntarily groaning “oh no” at another – and a dead cert for the most controversial. People will be outraged by it, and with good reason. But in a strange and brilliant way, it takes Didion’s death-of-the-Sixties observation and pushes it through a hellfire-hot catharsis.

Hollywood summoned up this horror, the film seems to be saying, and now it’s Hollywood’s turn to exorcise it. I can’t wait until the release in August, when we can finally talk about why.

~ Robbie Collin