Movie City Indie Archive for August, 2011

Twin Towers Cameos On Film

[By Dan Meth.]

David “Honeyboy” Edwards Plays “Gamblin’ Man” (3’15”)

From “Lightnin’ in a Bottle.” (2004)

Harmony Korine And Anthony Dod Mantle For Mahindra

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yASJcveJ9rU&feature=player_embedded

Adweek does not care for the Indian conglomerate’s anthemic spot. (The Mahindra Group also has alliances with the Sundance Institute, which began in January.) [Via Filmmaker.]

Bartonsville, VT: Goodbye To A Covered Bridge In The Hurricane

The instant the bridge disappears, a spat of rain hits the lens and blurs the absence.

Main Street, Margaretville, New York

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Taiwanese News Animators Make A Work Of Jobs

Starts strange. Gets bizarre. Gets even stranger. Star Wars gore! Why not?

The Nouvelle Vague In 2 Minutes, 30 Seconds

David Lynch On The iPhone

A perennial that seems timely this week…

8-Bit ZARDOZ

Press PLAY. [Via Boing Boing and R.]

Encoding MARTHA MARCY MAY MARLENE

Libyan Newsreader Waves Gun In Defense Of TV Station (:45)

Not quite Anderson Cooper cracking up over pee and poo jokes, but then what is?

The Sound of RISE/APES (11’53” vid)

“Acting as a foundation with an origin story for a new film series, director Rupert Wyatt takes the audience on the science fiction summer hit, Rise of the Planet of the Apes. The stunning visual effects produced by Weta Digital for the apes are complimented by the wide range of sounds recorded and edited for the film. Leading the sound team is supervising sound editor and sound designer Chuck Michael and co-supervisor John Larsen with the talents of first assistant sound editor Smokey Cloud and sound re-recording mixers Doug Hemphill and Ron Bartlett.”

When Jeremy Piven Met Robert Rodriguez

Makeup Design Oscar? Es nada.

Movie City Indie

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“I always thought that once I had lived in Chicago for a while, it would be interesting to do a portrait of the city – but to do it at a significant time. Figuring out when would be the ideal time to do that was the trick. So when this election came around, coupled with the Laquan McDonald trial, it seemed like the ideal time to do the story. Having lived in Chicagoland for thirty-five-plus years and done a number of films here, I’ve always been struck by the vibrancy of the city and its toughness. Its tenderness too. I’ve always been interested in the people at the center of all the stories. This is a different film in that regard, because we’re not following a couple of individuals over the course of the project in the way that a lot of the films I’ve done have, but I still feel like people’s voices and aspirations and hopes are at the center of this series.

It wasn’t easy. We started back in July 2018, it was actually on the Fourth of July – that was our first shoot. It’s like most documentaries in that the further you go along the more involved and obsessed you get, and you just start shooting more and more and more. We threw ourselves into this crazy year in Chicago. We got up every day and tried to figure out if we should be out shooting or not, and what it is we should shoot. We were trying to balance following this massive political story of the mayor’s race and these significant moments like the Laquan McDonald trial with taking the pulse of people in the city that we encounter along the way and getting a sense of their lives and what it means to live here. By election day, Zak Piper, our producer, had something like six cameras out in the field. You could double-check that, it might have been seven. We had this organized team effort to hit all the candidates as they were voting, if they hadn’t already voted. We hit tons of polling places, were at the Board of Elections and then were at the parties for the candidates that we had been able to follow closely. Then of course, we were trying to make sure we were at the parties of the candidates who made it to the runoff. So, yeah, it was kind of a monster.”
~ Steve James On City So Real

“I really want to see The Irishman. I’ve heard it’s big brother Martin Scorsese’s masterpiece. But I really can’t find the time. The promotion schedule is so tight, there’s no opportunity to see a three and a half-hour movie. But I really want to see it. In 2017, right before Okja’s New York premiere, I had the chance to go to Scorsese’s office, which is in the DGA building. There’s a lovely screening room there, too, with film prints that he’s collected. I talked to him for about an hour. There’s no movie he hasn’t seen, even Korean films. We talked about what he’s seen and his past work. It was a glorious day. I’ve loved his work since I was in college. Who doesn’t? Anyone involved with movies must feel the same way.”
~ Bong Joon-ho