Movie City Indie Archive for August, 2011

Twin Towers Cameos On Film

[By Dan Meth.]

David “Honeyboy” Edwards Plays “Gamblin’ Man” (3’15”)

From “Lightnin’ in a Bottle.” (2004)

Harmony Korine And Anthony Dod Mantle For Mahindra

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yASJcveJ9rU&feature=player_embedded

Adweek does not care for the Indian conglomerate’s anthemic spot. (The Mahindra Group also has alliances with the Sundance Institute, which began in January.) [Via Filmmaker.]

Bartonsville, VT: Goodbye To A Covered Bridge In The Hurricane

The instant the bridge disappears, a spat of rain hits the lens and blurs the absence.

Main Street, Margaretville, New York

1 Comment »

Taiwanese News Animators Make A Work Of Jobs

Starts strange. Gets bizarre. Gets even stranger. Star Wars gore! Why not?

The Nouvelle Vague In 2 Minutes, 30 Seconds

David Lynch On The iPhone

A perennial that seems timely this week…

8-Bit ZARDOZ

Press PLAY. [Via Boing Boing and R.]

Encoding MARTHA MARCY MAY MARLENE

Libyan Newsreader Waves Gun In Defense Of TV Station (:45)

Not quite Anderson Cooper cracking up over pee and poo jokes, but then what is?

The Sound of RISE/APES (11’53” vid)

“Acting as a foundation with an origin story for a new film series, director Rupert Wyatt takes the audience on the science fiction summer hit, Rise of the Planet of the Apes. The stunning visual effects produced by Weta Digital for the apes are complimented by the wide range of sounds recorded and edited for the film. Leading the sound team is supervising sound editor and sound designer Chuck Michael and co-supervisor John Larsen with the talents of first assistant sound editor Smokey Cloud and sound re-recording mixers Doug Hemphill and Ron Bartlett.”

When Jeremy Piven Met Robert Rodriguez

Makeup Design Oscar? Es nada.

Movie City Indie

Quote Unquotesee all »

“Because of my relative candor on Twitter regarding why I quit my day job, my DMs have overflowed with similar stories from colleagues around the globe. These peeks behind the curtains of film festivals, venues, distributors and funding bodies weren’t pretty. Certain dismal patterns recurred (and resonated): Boards who don’t engage with or even understand their organization’s artistic mission and are insensitive to the diverse neighborhood in which their organization’s venue is located; incompetent founders and/or presidents who create only obstacles, never solutions; unduly empowered, Trumpian bean counters who chip away at the taste and experiences that make organizations’ cultural offerings special; expensive PR teams that don’t bring to the table a bare-minimum familiarity with the rich subcultural art form they’re half-heartedly peddling as “product”; nonprofit arts organizations for whom art now ranks as a distant-second goal behind profit.”
~ Eric Allen Hatch

To me, Hunter S. Thompson was a hero. His early books were great, but in many ways, his life and career post–Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail is a cautionary tale for authors. People expected him to be high and drunk all the time and play that persona, and he stuck with that to the end, and I don’t think it was good for him. I always sort of feel mixed emotions when I hear that people went and hung out with Hunter and how great it was to get high with Hunter. The fact is the guy was having difficulty doing any sustained writing at all for years probably because so many quote, unquote, “friends” wanted to get high with him … There was a badly disappointed romantic there. I mean, that great line, “This is where the wave broke, the tide rolled back … ” This was a guy that was hurt and disappointed and very bitter about things, and it made his writing beautiful, and also with that came a lot of pain.
~ Anthony Bourdain