Movie City Indie Archive for August, 2011

Twin Towers Cameos On Film

[By Dan Meth.]

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David “Honeyboy” Edwards Plays “Gamblin’ Man” (3’15″)

From “Lightnin’ in a Bottle.” (2004)

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Harmony Korine And Anthony Dod Mantle For Mahindra

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yASJcveJ9rU&feature=player_embedded

Adweek does not care for the Indian conglomerate’s anthemic spot. (The Mahindra Group also has alliances with the Sundance Institute, which began in January.) [Via Filmmaker.]

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Bartonsville, VT: Goodbye To A Covered Bridge In The Hurricane

The instant the bridge disappears, a spat of rain hits the lens and blurs the absence.

Main Street, Margaretville, New York

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Taiwanese News Animators Make A Work Of Jobs

Starts strange. Gets bizarre. Gets even stranger. Star Wars gore! Why not?

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The Nouvelle Vague In 2 Minutes, 30 Seconds

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David Lynch On The iPhone

A perennial that seems timely this week…

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8-Bit ZARDOZ

Press PLAY. [Via Boing Boing and R.]

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Encoding MARTHA MARCY MAY MARLENE

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Libyan Newsreader Waves Gun In Defense Of TV Station (:45)

Not quite Anderson Cooper cracking up over pee and poo jokes, but then what is?

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The Sound of RISE/APES (11’53″ vid)

“Acting as a foundation with an origin story for a new film series, director Rupert Wyatt takes the audience on the science fiction summer hit, Rise of the Planet of the Apes. The stunning visual effects produced by Weta Digital for the apes are complimented by the wide range of sounds recorded and edited for the film. Leading the sound team is supervising sound editor and sound designer Chuck Michael and co-supervisor John Larsen with the talents of first assistant sound editor Smokey Cloud and sound re-recording mixers Doug Hemphill and Ron Bartlett.”

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When Jeremy Piven Met Robert Rodriguez

Makeup Design Oscar? Es nada.

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Movie City Indie

Quote Unquotesee all »

Julian Schnabel: Years ago, I was down there with my cousin’s wife Corky. She was wild — she wore makeup on her legs, and she had a streak in her hair like Yvonne De Carlo in “The Munsters.” She liked to paint. I had overalls on with just a T-shirt and looked like whatever. We were trying to buy a bunch of supplies with my cousin Jesse’s credit card. They looked at the credit card, and then they looked at us and thought maybe we stole the card, so they called Jesse up. He was a doctor who became the head of trauma at St. Vincent’s. They said, “There’s somebody here with this credit card and we want to know if it belongs to you.”

He said, “Well, does the woman have dyed blonde hair and fake eyelashes and look like she stepped out of the backstage of some kind of silent movie, and is she with some guy who has wild hair and is kind of dressed like a bum?”

“Yeah, that’s them.”

“Yeah, that’s my cousin and my wife. It’s okay, they can charge it on my card.”
~ Julian Schnabel Remembers NYC’s Now-Shuttered Pearl Paint

MB Cool. I was really interested in the aerial photography from Enter the Void and how one could understand that conceptually as a POV, while in fact it’s more of an objective view of the city where the story takes place. So it’s an objective and subjective camera at the same time. I know that you’re interested in Kubrick. We’ve talked about that in the past because it’s something that you and I have in common—

GN You’re obsessed with Kubrick, too.

MB Does he still occupy your mind or was he more of an early influence?

GN He was more of an early influence. Kubrick has been my idol my whole life, my own “god.” I was six or seven years old when I saw 2001: A Space Odyssey, and I never felt such cinematic ecstasy. Maybe that’s what brought me to direct movies, to try to compete with that “wizard of Oz” behind the film. So then, years later, I tried to do something in that direction, like many other directors tried to do their own, you know, homage or remake or parody or whatever of 2001. I don’t know if you ever had that movie in mind for your own projects. But in my case, I don’t think about 2001 anymore now. That film was my first “trip” ever. And then I tried my best to reproduce on screen what some drug trips are like. But it’s very hard. For sure, moving images are a better medium than words, but it’s still very far from the real experience. I read that Kubrick said about Lynch’s Eraserhead, that he wished he had made that movie because it was the film he had seen that came closest to the language of nightmares.

Matthew Barney and Gaspar Noé