Movie City Indie Archive for August, 2011

Twin Towers Cameos On Film

[By Dan Meth.]

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David “Honeyboy” Edwards Plays “Gamblin’ Man” (3’15”)

From “Lightnin’ in a Bottle.” (2004)

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Harmony Korine And Anthony Dod Mantle For Mahindra

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yASJcveJ9rU&feature=player_embedded

Adweek does not care for the Indian conglomerate’s anthemic spot. (The Mahindra Group also has alliances with the Sundance Institute, which began in January.) [Via Filmmaker.]

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Bartonsville, VT: Goodbye To A Covered Bridge In The Hurricane

The instant the bridge disappears, a spat of rain hits the lens and blurs the absence.

Main Street, Margaretville, New York

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Taiwanese News Animators Make A Work Of Jobs

Starts strange. Gets bizarre. Gets even stranger. Star Wars gore! Why not?

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The Nouvelle Vague In 2 Minutes, 30 Seconds

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David Lynch On The iPhone

A perennial that seems timely this week…

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8-Bit ZARDOZ

Press PLAY. [Via Boing Boing and R.]

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Encoding MARTHA MARCY MAY MARLENE

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Libyan Newsreader Waves Gun In Defense Of TV Station (:45)

Not quite Anderson Cooper cracking up over pee and poo jokes, but then what is?

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The Sound of RISE/APES (11’53” vid)

“Acting as a foundation with an origin story for a new film series, director Rupert Wyatt takes the audience on the science fiction summer hit, Rise of the Planet of the Apes. The stunning visual effects produced by Weta Digital for the apes are complimented by the wide range of sounds recorded and edited for the film. Leading the sound team is supervising sound editor and sound designer Chuck Michael and co-supervisor John Larsen with the talents of first assistant sound editor Smokey Cloud and sound re-recording mixers Doug Hemphill and Ron Bartlett.”

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When Jeremy Piven Met Robert Rodriguez

Makeup Design Oscar? Es nada.

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Movie City Indie

Quote Unquotesee all »

“The worst thing that we have in today’s movie culture is Rotten Tomatoes. It’s the destruction of our business. I have such respect and admiration for film criticism. When I was growing up film criticism was a real art. And there was intellect that went into that. And you would read Pauline’s Kael’s reviews, or some others, and that doesn’t exist anymore. Now it’s about a number. A compounded number of how many positives vs. negatives. Now it’s about, ‘What’s your Rotten Tomatoes score?’ And that’s sad, because the Rotten Tomatoes score was so low on Batman v Superman I think it put a cloud over a movie that was incredibly successful. People don’t realize what goes into making a movie like that. It’s mind-blowing. It’s just insane, it’s hurting the business, it’s getting people to not see a movie. In Middle America it’s, ‘Oh, it’s a low Rotten Tomatoes score so I’m not going to go see it because it must suck.’ But that number is an aggregate and one that nobody can figure out exactly what it means, and it’s not always correct. I’ve seen some great movies with really abysmal Rotten Tomatoes scores. What’s sad is film criticism has disappeared. It’s really sad.”
~ Brett Ratner Has A Sad

“The loss of a local newspaper critic is a real loss. People who know the local audience and know the local cultural scene are very important resources. You can’t just substitute the stuff that comes in from nowhere through syndication or the wire. I think at the same time, some of the newer outlets have really beefed up and improved their coverage and made room for criticism. The real problem is in the more specialized art forms — fine arts, classical music, dance and jazz, say. There is a real slowing of critical voices, partly because those art forms have smaller audiences. Newspapers and magazines can say that doesn’t get enough traffic, so we don’t have room for that. To me, that’s especially worrisome. This is the opposite of what newspapers are supposed to do, which is not to try to figure out what people are already interested in and recite that back to them, but to hopefully guide them to something that they should be interested in, connecting potential audiences with more interesting work.

“Then again, not everyone needs a critic. People have been going to movies for more than 100 years now, and probably the vast majority of those people have not read movie reviews or cared what critics thought. But there has always been an important subset that wants to know more, that wants to think about what they’ve seen and what they’re going to see, and wants someone to think along with. I think critics are important, not just as dispensers of consumer advice — though that’s certainly part of it, too — but as trusted voices and companions for people to argue with in your head when you’re going to movies or afterwards.”
~ A. O. Scott