Movie City Indie Archive for August, 2011

Twin Towers Cameos On Film

[By Dan Meth.]

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David “Honeyboy” Edwards Plays “Gamblin’ Man” (3’15”)

From “Lightnin’ in a Bottle.” (2004)

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Harmony Korine And Anthony Dod Mantle For Mahindra

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yASJcveJ9rU&feature=player_embedded

Adweek does not care for the Indian conglomerate’s anthemic spot. (The Mahindra Group also has alliances with the Sundance Institute, which began in January.) [Via Filmmaker.]

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Bartonsville, VT: Goodbye To A Covered Bridge In The Hurricane

The instant the bridge disappears, a spat of rain hits the lens and blurs the absence.

Main Street, Margaretville, New York

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Taiwanese News Animators Make A Work Of Jobs

Starts strange. Gets bizarre. Gets even stranger. Star Wars gore! Why not?

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The Nouvelle Vague In 2 Minutes, 30 Seconds

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David Lynch On The iPhone

A perennial that seems timely this week…

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8-Bit ZARDOZ

Press PLAY. [Via Boing Boing and R.]

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Encoding MARTHA MARCY MAY MARLENE

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Libyan Newsreader Waves Gun In Defense Of TV Station (:45)

Not quite Anderson Cooper cracking up over pee and poo jokes, but then what is?

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The Sound of RISE/APES (11’53” vid)

“Acting as a foundation with an origin story for a new film series, director Rupert Wyatt takes the audience on the science fiction summer hit, Rise of the Planet of the Apes. The stunning visual effects produced by Weta Digital for the apes are complimented by the wide range of sounds recorded and edited for the film. Leading the sound team is supervising sound editor and sound designer Chuck Michael and co-supervisor John Larsen with the talents of first assistant sound editor Smokey Cloud and sound re-recording mixers Doug Hemphill and Ron Bartlett.”

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When Jeremy Piven Met Robert Rodriguez

Makeup Design Oscar? Es nada.

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Movie City Indie

Quote Unquotesee all »

“When Bay keeps these absurd plot-gears spinning, he’s displaying his skill as a slick, professional entertainer. But then there are the images of motion—I hesitate to say, of things in motion, because it’s not clear how many things there are in the movie, instead of mere digital simulations of things. It doesn’t matter. What matters is that there’s a car chase through London, seen from the level of tires, that could have gone on for an hour, um, tirelessly. What matters is that the defenestrated Cade saves himself by leaping from drone to drone in midair like a frog skipping among lotus pads; that he and Vivian slide along the colossal, polished expanses of sharply tilting age-old fields of metal like luge Olympians. What matters is that, when this heroic duo find themselves thrust out into the void of inner space from a collapsing planet, it has a terrifyingly vast emptiness that Bay doesn’t dare hold for more than an instant lest he become the nightmare-master. What matters is that the enormous thing hurtling toward Earth is composed in a fanatical detail that would repay slow-motion viewing with near-geological patience. Bay has an authentic sense of the gigantic; beside the playful enormity of his Transformerized universe, the ostensibly heroic dimensions of Ridley Scott’s and Christopher Nolan’s massive visions seem like petulant vanities.”
~ Michael Bay Gives Richard Brody A Tingle

How do you see film evolving in this age of Netflix?

I thought the swing would be quicker and more violent. There have been two landmark moments in the history of French film. First in 1946, with the creation of the CNC under the aegis of Malraux. He saved French cinema by establishing the advance on receipts and support fund mechanisms. We’re all children of this political invention. Americans think that the State gives money to French films, but they’re wrong. Through this system, films fund themselves!

The other great turning point came by the hand of Jack Lang in the 1980s, after the creation of Canal+. While television was getting ready to become the nemesis of film, he created the decoder, and a specific broadcasting space between film and television, using new investments for film. That once again saved French film.

These political decisions are important. We’re once again facing big change. If our political masters don’t take control of the situation and new stakeholders like Netflix, Google and Amazon, we’re headed for disaster. We need to create obligations for Internet service providers. They can’t always be against film. They used to allow piracy, but now that they’ve become producers themselves, they’re starting to see things in a different light. This is a moment of transition, a strong political act needs to be put forward. And it can’t just be at national level, it has to happen at European level.

Filmmaker Cédric Klapisch